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Long Range Missile

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WORLD
April 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
India said it successfully test-fired a missile capable of carrying nuclear warheads across much of Asia and the Mideast. A test firing of the missile, the Agni III, had failed in July when the rocket plunged into the Bay of Bengal short of its target. India's current crop of missiles is mostly intended for confronting neighboring Pakistan. The Agni III, by contrast, is designed to reach 1,900 miles, putting China's major cities within range, as well as targets deep in the Middle East.
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WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe that North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures -- including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons -- after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
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WORLD
March 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
South Korea, the United States and Japan warned that North Korea's planned rocket launch would violate a U.N. resolution, a news report said. North Korea says it will send a communications satellite into orbit between April 4 and 8 as part of a peaceful bid to develop its space program. Choson Sinbo, a pro-North Korean newspaper in Tokyo, said the planned launch is part of an economic development project. But some governments suspect that North Korea will test technology for a long-range missile capable of striking Alaska.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures - including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons - after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
OPINION
July 7, 2006
Re "A Big, Booming Cry for More Attention?" July 6 It is now becoming painfully clear to North Korean leader Kim Jong Il that the long-range missile test conducted on July 4 was a failure. The United States and its allies should behave toward the failed saber-rattling with the respect due: silence. It should be well known to all parties involved that the missile test was a ploy intended to force the nations involved into negotiations. Its failure should prove that none are required.
NEWS
March 29, 1985 | United Press International
The State Department today charged Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new Soviet leader, with perpetuating "an old, disingenuous Soviet argument" by accusing the United States of trying to hide a military buildup. "So who is covering up what?" asked department spokesman Edward Djerejian.
WORLD
July 4, 2009 | Associated Press
North Korea fired three missiles off its eastern coast today, South Korea said, another in a series of launches since U.N. sanctions were imposed on the regime for its May nuclear test. Two missiles were fired between 8 and 8:30 a.m. local time, South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement. It did not give the range of the missiles. Another was fired later in the morning.
OPINION
April 22, 2012
North Korea is threatening "retaliatory measures" for a decision by the United States to withhold 240,000 metric tons of food promised as part of an agreement announced less than two months ago. Never mind that the cancellation followed Pyongyang's failed launching of a missile designed to put a satellite into space, an operation the U.S. considered a violation of that same agreement, not to mention U.N. Security Council resolutions. The regime's chutzpah and hypocrisy know no bounds.
WORLD
June 19, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Reacting to reports that North Korea may be preparing to test-fire a missile toward Hawaii, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that he had ordered additional assets deployed to shore up defense of the islands. Gates ordered the deployment of a powerful sea-based radar system that can help closely track the path of intercontinental ballistic missiles and also sent terminal-phase missile interceptors to Hawaii. The comments may be intended to deter North Korea from attempting another long-range missile launch and to reassure allies that the United States is willing to act to prevent a successful test by the government in Pyongyang.
OPINION
March 21, 2012 | By Michael J. Mazarr
Well, that didn't take long. Not even a month after the much-heralded accord in which North Korea agreed, among other things, to halt long-range missile testing, Pyongyang announced its intention to launch a satellite - with a long-range missile. This is, if nothing else, clever. The United States has put a lot of eggs into the basket of a denuclearization process and of improved relations supposedly inaugurated by the February nuclear deal. But if Washington stands by its position that this proposed satellite launch - a transparent ploy to test powerful rocket technology - would be a deal breaker, we'll be right back at square one. Pyongyang has us right where it wants us, in a sense, which shows again the bankruptcy of a policy designed to bargain for nuclear and missile concessions that the North is never going to provide.
OPINION
April 22, 2012
North Korea is threatening "retaliatory measures" for a decision by the United States to withhold 240,000 metric tons of food promised as part of an agreement announced less than two months ago. Never mind that the cancellation followed Pyongyang's failed launching of a missile designed to put a satellite into space, an operation the U.S. considered a violation of that same agreement, not to mention U.N. Security Council resolutions. The regime's chutzpah and hypocrisy know no bounds.
OPINION
March 21, 2012 | By Michael J. Mazarr
Well, that didn't take long. Not even a month after the much-heralded accord in which North Korea agreed, among other things, to halt long-range missile testing, Pyongyang announced its intention to launch a satellite - with a long-range missile. This is, if nothing else, clever. The United States has put a lot of eggs into the basket of a denuclearization process and of improved relations supposedly inaugurated by the February nuclear deal. But if Washington stands by its position that this proposed satellite launch - a transparent ploy to test powerful rocket technology - would be a deal breaker, we'll be right back at square one. Pyongyang has us right where it wants us, in a sense, which shows again the bankruptcy of a policy designed to bargain for nuclear and missile concessions that the North is never going to provide.
WORLD
July 4, 2009 | Associated Press
North Korea fired three missiles off its eastern coast today, South Korea said, another in a series of launches since U.N. sanctions were imposed on the regime for its May nuclear test. Two missiles were fired between 8 and 8:30 a.m. local time, South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement. It did not give the range of the missiles. Another was fired later in the morning.
WORLD
June 19, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Reacting to reports that North Korea may be preparing to test-fire a missile toward Hawaii, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that he had ordered additional assets deployed to shore up defense of the islands. Gates ordered the deployment of a powerful sea-based radar system that can help closely track the path of intercontinental ballistic missiles and also sent terminal-phase missile interceptors to Hawaii. The comments may be intended to deter North Korea from attempting another long-range missile launch and to reassure allies that the United States is willing to act to prevent a successful test by the government in Pyongyang.
WORLD
March 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
South Korea, the United States and Japan warned that North Korea's planned rocket launch would violate a U.N. resolution, a news report said. North Korea says it will send a communications satellite into orbit between April 4 and 8 as part of a peaceful bid to develop its space program. Choson Sinbo, a pro-North Korean newspaper in Tokyo, said the planned launch is part of an economic development project. But some governments suspect that North Korea will test technology for a long-range missile capable of striking Alaska.
WORLD
March 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Neighbors of North Korea reacted angrily Friday to its announcement that it plans to launch a satellite into orbit, and say they suspect the effort masks plans for a long-range missile test. Officials in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, informed international aviation and maritime agencies that the first stage of the rocket would splash down in the Sea of Japan and the second in the Pacific Ocean, which they identified as "danger zones" for shipping and aircraft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, WASHINGTON POST
On the morning after their wedding on the family ranch back in 1983, when any newlywed couple might be expected to dawdle, Russell and Hazel Cain wrenched themselves from sleep early. Along with their wedding guests, they were forced to drive into this thinly peopled desert community, park in the church lot and wait--until the regularly scheduled missile test over their house and land was completed. "We had lots of company, lots of out-of-town people," said Hazel Cain, 48.
WORLD
March 10, 2009 | John M. Glionna and Ju-min Park
The U.S. and South Korea on Monday began annual war games involving tens of thousands of troops, prompting North Korea to call its military into "full combat readiness," saying it views the joint land and sea exercises as a prelude to an invasion. The hostilities raised tensions on the Korean peninsula to their highest point in weeks as the U.S. and its allies anxiously awaited North Korea's test launch of its most advanced long-range missile.
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