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Long Range Missiles

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WORLD
May 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
NATO countries face a growing threat of attack by long-range missiles, a senior alliance official said as he presented a study on options for a missile shield system to protect Europe. Marshall Billingslea, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's assistant secretary-general for defense investment, spoke in Belgium about a four-year study. He declined to say who might pose such a threat or to assess the level of danger.
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WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe that North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures -- including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons -- after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
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NEWS
December 8, 1987 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev arrived here Monday for the summit and, immediately upon setting foot on American soil, challenged President Reagan to discuss new proposals for slashing long-range nuclear missiles. Alighting from his blue-and-white Ilyushin 62 jetliner under clear but chilly skies, Gorbachev declared: "We have something to say to the American leaders, to the President of the United States, and we are hoping that we will hear some new words on their side."
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures - including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons - after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
OPINION
May 18, 2002
For those who only cursorily read The Times, the headline "U.S., Russia to Cut Nuclear Arms" (May 14) appears to report a diplomatic breakthrough. It does not. The same weapons were declared cut in 1993 when the START II treaty was signed. And the new treaty fails in what the START and SALT treaties realized--the permanent destruction of these thermonuclear nightmares. The prospect of thousands of ill-secured nukes in Russia doesn't make me feel any safer. But here's the main question: If Russia is now a friend, an ally and a trading partner, why still train 1,700 long-range missiles on it?
OPINION
May 2, 2006
Re "War clouds," Opinion, April 28 How does Rosa Brooks believe that Israel and Iran would fight each other? It's not as if they are neighbors. Tel Aviv is almost 1,000 miles from Tehran almost twice as far as Baghdad, which was barely in range for the Israeli fighter jets that carried out the attack on Iraq's nuclear reactor. Israel has the same aircraft today, with the same range and no real aerial tanker capacity. If Israeli planes can't get to Iran, what difference does Iran's air defense make?
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | United Press International
Syria's massive arms purchases from the Soviet Union have made Damascus a "formidable fighting machine" but have driven it deeply into debt, Jane's Defense Weekly said Wednesday. The authoritative magazine on military matters said that Syria, with long-range missiles, is nearing strategic parity with Israel but would not be able to defeat the Israelis in a war because of Syria's inferior commanders.
OPINION
January 5, 2003
Re "Bush Defends Stand on N. Korea," Jan. 1: George W. Bush is currently serving us as president. My early civics classes taught me that the process of electing a president was a participatory exercise and that the winner was responsible both for and to the electorate that he or she serves. Yet, rebuking a reporter who had the impudence to suggest that a war with Iraq may be looming, Bush said at a press conference in Crawford, Texas: "I don't know why you say that. I hope we're not headed to war in Iraq."
WORLD
September 18, 2009 | Michael Muskal
President Obama announced Thursday that he would scrap plans to build a missile shield in Eastern Europe, a keystone of President George W. Bush's defense policy. Here is a primer on the issue. What was the missile shield? Under Bush, the United States was to build military installations to house 10 interceptor rockets in Poland and a radar system in the Czech Republic. Together they would form a missile shield designed to protect Eastern Europe from long-range missiles, with Iran usually cited as the possible aggressor.
OPINION
April 2, 2000
Rep. Ellen Tauscher's March 27 commentary, "Delay Decision on Nuclear Missile Shield," is fundamentally on the mark--the U.S. is neither technically nor politically ready to consider deploying a national missile defense. But she misconstrues at least one key issue. Tauscher argues that the planned NMD system would be "relatively useless if we were to face an all-out attack from . . . China." China currently has an estimated 20 long-range missiles capable of reaching the U.S. Even if it were only marginally effective, the planned system would still have a very good chance of defending against a Chinese attack.
WORLD
September 18, 2009 | Michael Muskal
President Obama announced Thursday that he would scrap plans to build a missile shield in Eastern Europe, a keystone of President George W. Bush's defense policy. Here is a primer on the issue. What was the missile shield? Under Bush, the United States was to build military installations to house 10 interceptor rockets in Poland and a radar system in the Czech Republic. Together they would form a missile shield designed to protect Eastern Europe from long-range missiles, with Iran usually cited as the possible aggressor.
WORLD
June 2, 2009 | John M. Glionna
North Korea has positioned its most sophisticated long-range ballistic missile at a launch site for a test that could come within weeks, a newspaper here reported Monday. The regime, which conducted a nuclear test in May, raising tensions worldwide, could fire its missile June 16, when South Korean President Lee Myung-bak is to meet with President Obama in Washington, according to the report.
WORLD
March 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Neighbors of North Korea reacted angrily Friday to its announcement that it plans to launch a satellite into orbit, and say they suspect the effort masks plans for a long-range missile test. Officials in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, informed international aviation and maritime agencies that the first stage of the rocket would splash down in the Sea of Japan and the second in the Pacific Ocean, which they identified as "danger zones" for shipping and aircraft.
WORLD
March 10, 2009 | John M. Glionna and Ju-min Park
The U.S. and South Korea on Monday began annual war games involving tens of thousands of troops, prompting North Korea to call its military into "full combat readiness," saying it views the joint land and sea exercises as a prelude to an invasion. The hostilities raised tensions on the Korean peninsula to their highest point in weeks as the U.S. and its allies anxiously awaited North Korea's test launch of its most advanced long-range missile.
WORLD
April 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
India said it successfully test-fired a missile capable of carrying nuclear warheads across much of Asia and the Mideast. A test firing of the missile, the Agni III, had failed in July when the rocket plunged into the Bay of Bengal short of its target. India's current crop of missiles is mostly intended for confronting neighboring Pakistan. The Agni III, by contrast, is designed to reach 1,900 miles, putting China's major cities within range, as well as targets deep in the Middle East.
WORLD
May 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
NATO countries face a growing threat of attack by long-range missiles, a senior alliance official said as he presented a study on options for a missile shield system to protect Europe. Marshall Billingslea, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's assistant secretary-general for defense investment, spoke in Belgium about a four-year study. He declined to say who might pose such a threat or to assess the level of danger.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Israeli officer expressed deep concern Friday over new long-range missiles that Iraq has recently deployed near the Jordanian border. "They could use those missiles against civilian targets in Israel," warned the officer, who spoke on condition that he not be identified. "This means that Iraq could hit targets in Israel without engaging our forces on the ground. What particularly concerns us is they have a 'non-conventional' capability for those surface-to-surface missiles."
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Iranian Prime Minister Hussein Moussavi said Sunday that his country is producing "sophisticated offensive chemical weapons" and has deployed long-range missiles along its war front with Iraq. Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency quoted Moussavi as saying that Iran will also soon begin manufacturing fighter aircraft. He was addressing Parliament in Tehran, presenting the government's new annual budget.
OPINION
May 2, 2006
Re "War clouds," Opinion, April 28 How does Rosa Brooks believe that Israel and Iran would fight each other? It's not as if they are neighbors. Tel Aviv is almost 1,000 miles from Tehran almost twice as far as Baghdad, which was barely in range for the Israeli fighter jets that carried out the attack on Iraq's nuclear reactor. Israel has the same aircraft today, with the same range and no real aerial tanker capacity. If Israeli planes can't get to Iran, what difference does Iran's air defense make?
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