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February 15, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In a bohemian stretch of Sunset Boulevard that winds through Silver Lake, there's a stereo repair shop with an exterior that seems, for some, oddly familiar: The coiling red and blue lines on its external wall served as the cover for an album by a battered troubadour named Elliott Smith, a Los Angeles musician who at the time of the record's release, in 2000, was one of pop's bright lights -- someone who combined dark, sometimes self-lacerating lyrics...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Jim Rash and Nat Faxon
It all started with a phone call. At the time, we were at a movie theater. On the phone, our "team" of managers and agents. We ran out into the hallway to answer. (Our apologies to whatever movie we were seeing at the time. This was a call we had been anticipating.) "Congrats, guys. Fox Searchlight has greenlit the movie. It's a go!" said the voice on the other end. Cheers and congratulations followed. That was in 2005. Before it all fell apart ... the first time. What followed was an eight-year journey, traversing different studios, directors and producers, all trying to make our first screenplay a reality.
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OPINION
August 31, 2009
The first barrier to Californians calling a convention to draft a new state Constitution: Doing so may be unconstitutional. The current document, adopted in 1879 and amended hundreds of times since, protects itself by outlining the single way it can be scrapped. Voters can call a convention, but only after two-thirds of the members of each house of the Legislature put the question on the ballot. Two lawmakers introduced bills late last year to call for a convention, but they are unlikely to get anywhere because many members of the Legislature correctly see in the move a wrenching change in the way they currently do business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc and Laura J. Nelson
The around-the-clock rumble and hum of big rigs and cars funneling in and out of one of the world's busiest port complexes have for years defined daily life in west Long Beach. Streets of tidy homes, schools and playgrounds are boxed in by refineries, rail yards and truck routes to the harbor, including the gritty, four-mile Terminal Island Freeway. Children are hospitalized for asthma at three times the rate of other Long Beach neighborhoods, and there are far fewer parks here.
SPORTS
January 31, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
A point out of a playoff berth entering the NHL's four-day All-Star break, the Kings return to the ice Tuesday night against the Minnesota Wild to begin a 10-game stretch that could make or break their season. Problem is all 10 of those games will be on the road, where the Kings have one of the worst records in the league. It has been a remarkable slide for a team that led the NHL with 24 road victories last season. And Coach Terry Murray said the Kings, who are on a three-game winning streak, will have to recapture that magic or risk falling out of playoff contention by the end of the month.
OPINION
September 13, 2009 | Doyle McManus
President Obama set out a long list of worthy goals in his healthcare speech to Congress last week, but at least one of them was utterly unrealistic. "I am not the first president to take up this cause," he said, "but I am determined to be the last." If Obama succeeds in winning a comprehensive healthcare bill, he will have established, for the first time, a federal government obligation to make some kind of health insurance available to every citizen and require him or her to be insured.
SPORTS
June 7, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
One swing of the bat and more than 44,000 fans in Dodger Stadium erupted. As the ball sailed over the right-field fence - with the bases loaded - even Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully was at a loss. "I don't believe it!" he exclaimed to television viewers. "A grand-slam home run!" On the Dodgers radio broadcast, veteran announcer Charley Steiner shouted, "This doesn't happen even in Hollywood!" As the stadium shook with emotion and Dodgers in the dugout exchanged high-fives and hugs, a chiseled 6-foot-3, 245-pound ballplayer circled the bases.
SPORTS
June 23, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
The longest night dragged on and on at the NHL's entry draft in Pittsburgh. Then again, a few more hours hardly mattered for left wing Tanner Pearson. The 19-year-old could have been drafted twice before but was not selected. Finally, in his third year of draft eligibility, the Stanley Cup champion Kings took Pearson with the last pick (No. 30) in the first round on Friday night. His immediate family was on hand for the big moment. "If I was a betting man, I'd probably say tears were shed by my dad more than my mom," he said in a telephone interview Friday night.
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Todd Martin
On Nov. 12, 1993, when the first UFC went live on pay-per-view, a young fourth grader named Johny Hendricks was a sports obsessed busybody at Will Rogers Elementary in Edmond, Okla. Hendricks has grown up with the sport and now 20 years later he has the opportunity to score the crowning achievement of his MMA career as the UFC celebrates its 20th anniversary. Standing in Hendricks' way is no minor obstacle: the great UFC welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre, he of an 11-fight win streak against the best welterweights in the world and no unavenged career losses.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani, David Zucchino and Scott Gold
WEST BEACH HAVEN, N.J. -- Sandy's departure from the Northeast on Tuesday brought no hint of relief, revealing instead a tableau of splintered trees, severed beaches, shuttered businesses and the harsh reality that the storm will test even the most hardened resolve in weeks to come. The U.S. death toll rose to 50, including three children, and estimates of the property damage soared to $20 billion, which would make Sandy among the nation's costliest natural disasters. More than 8 million homes and businesses in 17 states were without power, half of them in New York and New Jersey.
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Todd Martin
On Nov. 12, 1993, when the first UFC went live on pay-per-view, a young fourth grader named Johny Hendricks was a sports obsessed busybody at Will Rogers Elementary in Edmond, Okla. Hendricks has grown up with the sport and now 20 years later he has the opportunity to score the crowning achievement of his MMA career as the UFC celebrates its 20th anniversary. Standing in Hendricks' way is no minor obstacle: the great UFC welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre, he of an 11-fight win streak against the best welterweights in the world and no unavenged career losses.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
On-screen, Vin Diesel's default setting can be described as coiled rage and brutal efficiency. In the films that put him on Hollywood's star map, the buff and bald actor hefts big guns: from artillery to his own softball-sized biceps. He punches the accelerator on the fastest hot rods and pummels enemies into submission without hesitation or fear. So it's surprising to discover that in 2011, just weeks before cameras rolled on "Riddick" - this weekend's sequel to 2000's "Pitch Black" and 2004's "The Chronicles of Riddick" - Diesel found himself facing existential dread.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | Thomas Curwen
Huddled in the soot-blackened tunnel that burned in the aftermath of last Saturday's freeway crash in Elysian Valley, a team of fluorescently dressed, hard-hatted engineers peered at the mottled ceiling. One shined a penlight into a far-away corner. Another took pictures. A drilling machine nearly drowned out their voices as they discussed the fire-eroded surface, a roughened texture of stones and concrete that looked like a neo-Expressionist art installation. They had just come from a conference room where they spoke in the easy shorthand of the trade, words passing among them like "carbonation," "incipient spalls" and "surface delamination.
SPORTS
June 7, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
One swing of the bat and more than 44,000 fans in Dodger Stadium erupted. As the ball sailed over the right-field fence - with the bases loaded - even Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully was at a loss. "I don't believe it!" he exclaimed to television viewers. "A grand-slam home run!" On the Dodgers radio broadcast, veteran announcer Charley Steiner shouted, "This doesn't happen even in Hollywood!" As the stadium shook with emotion and Dodgers in the dugout exchanged high-fives and hugs, a chiseled 6-foot-3, 245-pound ballplayer circled the bases.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Broderick Turner, Los Angeles Times
It's slightly more than halfway through the season and already there have been some defining moments and games for the Clippers. There was the NBA-best 17-game winning streak, and victories over such teams as the Miami Heat, Boston Celtics, San Antonio Spurs, Chicago Bulls and the Lakers. And now the Clippers are about to enter another defining period, a season-high eight-game, 13-day trip that could determine the course of their season. This will be the longest trip for the Clippers since an 11-game excursion during the 2010-11 season.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani, David Zucchino and Scott Gold
WEST BEACH HAVEN, N.J. -- Sandy's departure from the Northeast on Tuesday brought no hint of relief, revealing instead a tableau of splintered trees, severed beaches, shuttered businesses and the harsh reality that the storm will test even the most hardened resolve in weeks to come. The U.S. death toll rose to 50, including three children, and estimates of the property damage soared to $20 billion, which would make Sandy among the nation's costliest natural disasters. More than 8 million homes and businesses in 17 states were without power, half of them in New York and New Jersey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1988
Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp's assessment that California street gangs are becoming full-fledged national crime networks is not, at first glance, the raw material of hope. But it does rivet the mind on the dangers of ignoring gang violence. And it coincides with a building number of proposals for dealing with the gang problem.
WORLD
March 29, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
The man and woman who came to the 5-year-old boy's house in October were friendly and smiled a lot. They carried a bag of dried beans and asked where his mother was. Alan Mutemagawu was thrilled -- his mother would be happy to get the beans. Proudly, he led them the hour's walk to the village where she was in hiding from Zimbabwean security agents. The smiling couple didn't say much. But his mother didn't look pleased when Alan turned up with the visitors. "She looked sad.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Beyonce won't be hitting the stratosphere for Clint Eastwood, as the singer announced Wednesday she was no longer available to star in his adaptation of "A Star Is Born. " "For months we tried to coordinate our schedules to bring this remake to life but it was just not possible. Hopefully in the future we will get a chance to work together," Mrs. Jay-Z said in a statement.  It's been a long road for the film, which has had previous incarnations starring the likes of Barbra Streisand and Judy Garland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2012 | Phil Willon and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Cash was so tight in San Bernardino that potholes went unfilled, burned-out streetlights were left untouched and ball fields languished unmowed. That was two years ago, when the City Council learned that San Bernardino's $22-million budget shortfall would jump to $38 million by 2012, sending the city into financial ruin. City leaders slashed the workforce, extracted temporary concessions from labor unions and auctioned off public land. But they failed to heed warnings that those steps weren't nearly enough to address endemic problems in the Inland Empire city.
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