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NEWS
October 10, 1986 | Associated Press
Pickets lined up along the New Orleans waterfront today after contract talks with shippers broke down and about 2,100 longshoremen abruptly walked off the job.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Big, round numbers always get people's attention. Numbers such as $1 billion, which has been bandied about as the economic loss per day nationally from the eight-day strike that shut down most of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. That figure makes it sound as if several hundred port workers, members of Local 63 Office Clerical Unit of the Longshoremen's union, jeopardized the entire economy of Southern California, if not the entire nation. The corollary is How dare they? So let's put that figure in some context.
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NATIONAL
November 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A government lawsuit against the International Longshoremen's Union, aimed at wresting control of the nation's docks from alleged organized crime, was dismissed by a federal judge who called the effort well-intentioned but overreaching. The civil racketeering lawsuit targeted union officials and mobsters. It had dragged for two years through pretrial meetings and motions until U.S. District Judge I. Leo Glasser granted the union's request to dismiss.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of angry longshoremen walked off the job at ports in the Pacific Northwest on Thursday, effectively shutting down loading and unloading operations in a wildcat labor action that turned into a raucous confrontation — with union members storming a grain export terminal and holding security guards at bay for hours. Shipping terminals in Seattle, Tacoma and Everett were idled as workers joined the protest in the town of Longview, where police said union members rushed into a contested loading area in the pre-dawn hours, cutting brake lines on a train full of grain, pushing a security vehicle into a ditch and dumping part of the grain cargo off the train.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of angry longshoremen walked off the job at ports in the Pacific Northwest on Thursday, effectively shutting down loading and unloading operations in a wildcat labor action that turned into a raucous confrontation — with union members storming a grain export terminal and holding security guards at bay for hours. Shipping terminals in Seattle, Tacoma and Everett were idled as workers joined the protest in the town of Longview, where police said union members rushed into a contested loading area in the pre-dawn hours, cutting brake lines on a train full of grain, pushing a security vehicle into a ditch and dumping part of the grain cargo off the train.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN
As a show of support for striking teachers, the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union is offering temporary work cards to United Teachers-Los Angeles members. Evidently, the notion of pushing pallets is palatable. Richard Lomeli, ILWU Local 13 secretary-treasurer, said Thursday that 30 teachers had already completed applications and that he expects to receive 170 more by this afternoon. Lomeli conceded, however, that picketers need harbor no illusions of permanently trading their textbooks for forklifts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994
Los Angeles longshoremen will hold a rally at a San Pedro Ralphs supermarket at noon Friday in memory of the two Japanese students who died after being shot in the store's parking lot last week. The rally at Western Avenue and Park Western Drive will be open to the public. The International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union plans to lay a wreath in the students' honor and to announce a program aimed at stemming violent crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1989 | H. G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
Joe Vinole likes to use newsprint--those giant rolls that end up on doorsteps as folded newspapers--to explain why longshoremen's jobs are going the way of the ebbing tide on the San Diego waterfront. Thirty-five years ago, longshoremen were required to go into a ship's hold and send individual rolls of newsprint up to the dock on a winch. The big cylinders were then rolled one-at-a-time down a ramp and loaded onto two-wheeled carts. One longshoreman then wheeled a 1,700-pound newsprint roll into a dockside warehouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1990 | GREG KRIKORIAN and IAN M. ROSE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 400 would-be female dockworkers gathered Friday at the longshoremen's union hall in Wilmington, a place where Lady Luck traditionally has not been much of a sister to women. It's a place where the brawniest men will tell you, in whispers, that your best chance at landing a job is to have a father or brother or uncle already working the docks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL
On Harry Bridges Boulevard in the Port of Los Angeles is a historic landmark that is notable for its obscurity. It gets no visitors. Nor does it even mention the names of the slain longshoremen it is supposed to honor. The little-known monument, which was built by the port, anonymously commemorates Dickie Parker of San Pedro and John Knudson of Lomita. Armed guards hired by shipping lines shot them to death during the 1934 strike that led to the unionization of West Coast dockworkers.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Ronald D. White
Several times, the small boy at the union toy giveaway looked over his shoulder at Steve Roldan and then back at the Hot Wheels V-Drop Super Velocity Track Set. "Am I going to be able to keep this?" the boy asked. "Is this really mine?" The longshoreman knew how the child felt. The 51-year-old had handed back his own prized possession, the first new car he'd ever bought, after work at the San Pedro docks dwindled and the car payments became too much to handle. "If I had a Christmas wish, it would be to see more ships in this harbor," Roldan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Ever since the 1930s, when Harry Bridges founded the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the legendary labor leader's name has conjured images of dockworker walkouts and bloody clashes with police on the picket lines in the hardworking port communities of Wilmington and San Pedro.
OPINION
December 29, 2008
Re "Glug, glug," Opinion, Dec. 22 The waterfront has always been a telling economic indicator. For years, longshoremen have been able to describe the state of the economy because they see what comes into the country and what goes out. Over the years, we have understood that imported cargo created good jobs here in the United States and that exports provided farmers, miners, ranchers and refinery workers with overseas markets for their products....
BUSINESS
July 2, 2008 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
As a West Coast contract covering 26,000 dockworkers ran out Tuesday evening, concern rippled among U.S. retailers about a possible strike -- even though talks are continuing. "From our perspective, it's critical that these negotiations get resolved peacefully and that a new contract gets put in place as quickly as possible," said Jonathan Gold, who focuses on supply-chain and customs issues as a vice president of the National Retail Federation, a trade group.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A government lawsuit against the International Longshoremen's Union, aimed at wresting control of the nation's docks from alleged organized crime, was dismissed by a federal judge who called the effort well-intentioned but overreaching. The civil racketeering lawsuit targeted union officials and mobsters. It had dragged for two years through pretrial meetings and motions until U.S. District Judge I. Leo Glasser granted the union's request to dismiss.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2004 | Ronald D. White and Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writers
Efforts to unclog Southern California's jammed ports are foundering. Labor officials said Wednesday that a highly publicized plan to hire and train 3,000 nonunion dockworkers -- touted as a relatively quick way to ease record traffic at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach -- has been a disappointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Peter Bentovoja received the biggest pay raise of his life--$200 a month--three days before his 100th birthday. The San Pedro centenarian's "pay raise" was actually an increase in his longshoremen's union pension that took effect New Year's Day. The increase alone, he says, is more than what he was earning when he retired 35 years ago. "First thing you should buy a new chair for yourself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles longshoremen gathered at noon Friday at the spot where two Japanese students were gunned down last week to mourn the deaths and to hear their union's promises to fight crime by creating jobs and promoting tolerance. To applause, David Arian, president of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, outlined a union-backed program intended to stem violence in the Los Angeles Harbor area where many union members live and work.
NEWS
April 8, 2003 | Carol Pogash and Chris O'Connell, Special to The Times
Police opened fire with nonlethal weapons on antiwar protesters and some longshoremen Monday morning outside the Port of Oakland while several demonstrators hurled rocks, steel bolts and concrete at officers in riot gear. Police arrested 30 people for allegedly blocking strategic gates and failing to disperse. Several hundred demonstrators left peacefully, authorities said.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2002 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Delegates representing West Coast dockworkers are gathering this week in San Francisco to debate a contract proposal hammered out last month between union leaders and major shippers and terminal operators. The delegates' caucus is crucial because its outcome will help sway how the 10,500 members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union will vote in January. At least 60% of the ILWU membership must ratify the pact for it to pass.
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