Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLongshoremen Labor Relations
IN THE NEWS

Longshoremen Labor Relations

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Los Angeles was paralyzed Saturday by an unexpected strike of the tiny, 11-member union of pilots who steer huge oil tankers, freighters and passenger vessels through the narrow channels of the nation's second-busiest harbor. Although management personnel were available to navigate the eight ships that arrived Saturday, the walkout halted port operations because longshoremen, who load and unload the massive vessels, refused to cross the pilots' picket line.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County strikers idled the Port of Hueneme for several hours Tuesday, stranding four cargo-laden ships at the docks until a longshoremen's union official arrived and halted the action. About 30 Service Employee International Union picketers marched outside the port until midmorning as members of the Teamsters and longshoremen's unions waited alongside, unwilling to cross the picket line. About 10 a.m.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"An injury to one is an injury to all." For years that classic expression of worker solidarity was well-known to the rank and file at Local 13 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. It was emblazoned on the hats and jackets members wore to work in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. It topped the letterhead of their union bulletins and was inscribed on a plaque at Local 13's business hall in Wilmington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government sued the longshore workers union and the largest shipping association on the West Coast on Friday in a discrimination case that could force them to pay $2.75 million in damages and hire hundreds of minorities as apprentice dockworkers in the county's harbor. Attorneys for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission brought the lawsuit against the Pacific Maritime Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
More than 100 longshoremen protested outside a Terminal Island scrap-metal export business Tuesday, the sixth day of a bitter labor dispute marked by competing accusations of violence. An officer from the Los Angeles Police Department's labor relations division said police were investigating an incident early Friday in which management officials from Hugo Neu-Proler Co. allegedly turned a water cannon on picketers from the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997
Longshore workers at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles joined other West Coast dockworkers Monday in an eight-hour work stoppage to show solidarity with dockworkers in Liverpool, England. Members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, Locals 13 and 63, refused to work between 6 p.m. Monday and 2 a.m. today, demanding the reinstatement of Liverpool dockworkers who were fired during a work dispute two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by more than 135 illegal union actions that have repeatedly idled West Coast ports since 1996, a powerful organization of shipping companies is seeking a court order to prevent dock workers from violating contract provisions designed to prohibit strikes and work slowdowns. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal administrative law judge ruled Tuesday that one of the nation's major seafaring unions violated federal labor law by coercing employees of a Redondo Beach oil tanker service into joining the union without an election. Judge Frederick C. Herzog of the National Labor Relations Board concluded that the Seafarers International Union engaged in unfair labor practices in March when it tried to recruit employees of Gulf Caribe Maritime Inc.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The next week is critical for the highest job-generating "industry" in Southern California, international trade. Negotiations for a new contract between 90 shipping companies that use the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union will go down to the wire. It's almost certain there won't be a strike--a shipper participant in the negotiations says privately that "there is nothing on the table that can't be worked out."
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of workers went on strike at Virginia's Newport News Shipbuilding. "We haven't heard a word" from shipyard management, Arnold Outlaw, president of Local 8888 of the United Steelworkers of America, said before workers struck. The union, which represents many of the yard's 9,200 hourly workers, had said it would strike over what it says are insufficient raises in a proposed new contract.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal administrative law judge ruled Tuesday that one of the nation's major seafaring unions violated federal labor law by coercing employees of a Redondo Beach oil tanker service into joining the union without an election. Judge Frederick C. Herzog of the National Labor Relations Board concluded that the Seafarers International Union engaged in unfair labor practices in March when it tried to recruit employees of Gulf Caribe Maritime Inc.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Representatives from labor, management and the shipping industry are scheduled today to discuss the impact on local ports of the recently ratified labor agreement between longshore workers and the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents steamship lines and terminal operators along the West Coast. The three-year contract, approved Aug. 25 by the International Longshore & Warehouse Union, increases pay, health insurance and pension benefits.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Longshore workers and shipping companies agreed to a new labor contract late Thursday, clearing the way for the resumption of normal cargo operations at West Coast ports that have been plagued by work stoppages and slowdowns for the last 10 days. After almost two months of bargaining in San Francisco, the powerful International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Assn.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With contract negotiations heading into their eighth week, slowdowns by dock workers have spread to all major West Coast ports, where the movement of cargo at many terminals is taking at least twice as long as usual, according to shipping company estimates. The persistent slowdowns have become a concern for many of the nation's largest retailers, who fear that the pace of work will trigger delays and transportation bottlenecks as the country heads into the busiest shipping season of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They combine the role of boss and worker, administrator and laborer. Together, the three longshoremen who form a majority on the Port of Hueneme's harbor commission are unique: At none of the other 108 ports in 28 states and five U.S. territories do the laborers who work the docks also run the port. "It's the only one now," said Rex Sherman, chief researcher at the American Assn. of Port Authorities in Virginia. "And I think that it may be the first ever."
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a work slowdown continued in the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, longshore workers returned to their jobs in Oakland on Thursday, ending a two-day shutdown of the nation's fourth-largest harbor. "We are up and running. Things are a bit slow around here, but it's nothing we can't handle," said Debbie Girard, a representative for the Bay Area port.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997
At the behest of about 250 longshore workers who crowded a City Hall meeting room, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to postpone the opening of a coal storage and shipping facility at Terminal Island until concerns about dust and emissions are addressed. A local union of longshore workers protested on the steps of City Hall, saying the dust from the coal storage and shipping operation is expected to create health problems for harbor workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1996
The nation's busiest seaport complex was idle Thursday as thousands of union dockworkers took the day off to weigh a proposed new contract. Cranes and terminals at the twin harbors of Los Angeles and Long Beach were silent while rank-and-file members of the International Warehousemen's and Longshoremen's Union gathered to review a three-year contract negotiated with the steamship lines that employ them. They are expected back to work today.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After almost seven weeks of contract negotiations, longshore workers shut down the Port of Oakland for the second straight day Wednesday and continued work slowdowns in Los Angeles and Long Beach, actions that may portend more serious labor-management tensions at West Coast ports in the days ahead. The job actions by members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union coincide with a break in contract talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1999 | Associated Press
Longshore workers shut down the Port of Oakland and slowed work in Los Angeles and Long Beach on Tuesday as negotiators studied a proposed wage and benefits offer from steamship companies and port operators, management officials said. The action, apparently originating with Local 10 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, stopped most activity at the port, which includes 12 cargo terminals serving 33 shipping lines.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|