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Lonnie Burr

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1995
Your two pieces on the Mouseketeers (Oct. 7 and 9) contain the same error. The Mouseketeers last appeared at Disneyland performing in a live variety show in 1985, one decade--not two decades--ago. In 1980, I wrote and co-directed/co-choreographed with Barbara Epstein a show that ran at the now-defunct Tomorrowland Stage with six original "mice": Sharon, Sherry, Ronnie, Tommy, Cubby and myself. The show reran in 1981 and was the biggest attraction at the park during our October/November time frame.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1995
Your two pieces on the Mouseketeers (Oct. 7 and 9) contain the same error. The Mouseketeers last appeared at Disneyland performing in a live variety show in 1985, one decade--not two decades--ago. In 1980, I wrote and co-directed/co-choreographed with Barbara Epstein a show that ran at the now-defunct Tomorrowland Stage with six original "mice": Sharon, Sherry, Ronnie, Tommy, Cubby and myself. The show reran in 1981 and was the biggest attraction at the park during our October/November time frame.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1990 | LONNIE BURR
When Disneyland opened on July 17, 1955, President Eisenhower was serving his first term, a Cadillac cost less than $3,000 and a new word entered the language: Mouseketeers. "The Mickey Mouse Club" premiered Oct. 3, 1955, and immediately enthralled millions of children. The ABC hit children's series ran until 1959, was re-ran from 1961 to 1965, and gave birth to a second version of "The New Mickey Mouse Club" from 1975 to 1977 and from 1983 to 1989 on the Disney Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1990 | LONNIE BURR
The nine of us who survived for the entire show are all now in our 40s, with careers and families. The original Mouseketeers had a lot of social and professional reunions in the '80s. We starred in an hourlong 1980 NBC special celebrating our 25th anniversary and performed live at Disneyland for two months each year from 1980 through 1985. We also appeared on a number of talk shows and at charity benefits. We get together frequently at parties, weddings, even christenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006
APPARENTLY Ken Bloom has never heard of playwright Luigi Pirandello, who, post Aeschylus and pre-O'Neill, wrote the 1921 hit "Six Characters in Search of an Author," in which addressing the audience is most prominent ["Are You Talkin' to Me?" May 14]. It is the first substantive use of this anti-convention in modern theater. LONNIE BURR San Clemente
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997
I must make a succinct comment on your somewhat naive piece on TV producer Steven Bochco and casting director Junie Lowry-Johnson and their "family" of actors ("Say, Isn't That . . . ?," by Susan King, Sept. 14). Having a paid repertory company, while good for a few actors, discriminates against many, perhaps most, actors. My manager has for years found it impossible to get me an audition for Ms. Lowry-Johnson even though I have appeared in hundreds of films, TV series (including "Hill Street Blues"--different casting director)
MAGAZINE
February 10, 1991
I read in horrified amazement "Impresario of the Avant-Garde" (by Richard Stayton, Dec. 23/30), about hauteur auteur Reza Abdoh's puerile, indulgent and relentless rehashings of Antonin Artaudisms. Egad, if Abdoh learns of Gordon Craig's uber -marionettes, there will be absolutely no one to question the new emperor's solipsistic rampages, which his networking coterie of unschooled mentors have thrust upon theater as new ( sic ) and revolutionary ( sick-sic )
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1993
There is an error in "New Prestige for Old Theater" in The Times Valley Edition, Feb. 10. For the second time, the Actors Alley Troupe has been characterized as producing plays in North Hollywood for 21 years. This is not correct. Actors Alley was founded and produced plays in Van Nuys for many years and did not move to North Hollywood until the mid- to late 1980s. I directed Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano" in the late '70s at the theater rented by Actors Alley on the southeast corner of Van Nuys Boulevard, one block south of Ventura Boulevard.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1990 | LONNIE BURR
When Disneyland opened on July 17, 1955, President Eisenhower was serving his first term, a Cadillac cost less than $3,000 and a new word entered the language: Mouseketeers. "The Mickey Mouse Club" premiered Oct. 3, 1955, and immediately enthralled millions of children. The ABC hit children's series ran until 1959, was re-ran from 1961 to 1965, and gave birth to a second version of "The New Mickey Mouse Club" from 1975 to 1977 and from 1983 to 1989 on the Disney Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1990 | LONNIE BURR
The nine of us who survived for the entire show are all now in our 40s, with careers and families. The original Mouseketeers had a lot of social and professional reunions in the '80s. We starred in an hourlong 1980 NBC special celebrating our 25th anniversary and performed live at Disneyland for two months each year from 1980 through 1985. We also appeared on a number of talk shows and at charity benefits. We get together frequently at parties, weddings, even christenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996
Kristine McKenna awakened my memories of the Hollywood Bowl with her article "A Bowl Full of Memories" (June 30). All of those people who took the long walk up from Highland Avenue into the Bowl from 1934 through 1938 passed me, a little runt singing his lungs out: "Get your mornin' Examiner--Examiner for a nickel!" The limos disgorged all of Hollywood's stardom in front of me. Sometimes their chauffeurs would let me scalp their tickets for a (fair) split. I made a buck. LYLE EPSTEIN Barstow When I accompanied Barbra Streisand during her first Central Park concert in 1968, I thought that was the ultimate experience--little did I know.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Bonnie Lynn Fields, who danced and sang her way into pop-culture posterity as one of Walt Disney's Mouseketeers, died Saturday in Richmond, Ind. She was 68. Fields, a heavy smoker earlier in her life, was diagnosed with throat cancer about two years ago, according to her friend and former student Emily Kay Tillman. The South Carolina native was 12 when she was offered a prized slot on "The Mickey Mouse Club," the children's variety show that launched the careers of Annette Funicello and others.
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