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Lonny Chapman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Lonny Chapman, a stage and screen actor who was the founding artistic director of a theater company that is one of the oldest in North Hollywood and now bears his name, has died. He was 87. Chapman, whose television and movie career spanned more than 50 years, died Oct. 12 of heart disease at Sherman Village Healthcare Center in North Hollywood, said Janet Wood, a founding member of the Lonny Chapman Group Repertory Theatre.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Lonny Chapman, a stage and screen actor who was the founding artistic director of a theater company that is one of the oldest in North Hollywood and now bears his name, has died. He was 87. Chapman, whose television and movie career spanned more than 50 years, died Oct. 12 of heart disease at Sherman Village Healthcare Center in North Hollywood, said Janet Wood, a founding member of the Lonny Chapman Group Repertory Theatre.
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NEWS
April 16, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
Give Lonny Chapman a red badge for persistence. It was almost 50 years ago that Chapman, artistic director of the Group Repertory Theatre, first read Stephen Crane's 1895 novel "The Red Badge of Courage." Forty-three years ago, he did a scene from it in acting class. Twenty-three years ago, he worked on it improvisationally with Jack Nicholson and Beau Bridges, and "almost got an act." One year ago, he pulled out the script and said, "I'm going to deal with this."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Hollywood, it seems, isn't that far removed from 19th century Russia. Nor is Philadelphia or the Texas-Oklahoma border. "Chekhov U.S.A.," at Group Repertory Theatre, transplants short plays by Anton Chekhov to American soil. Adapted and directed by Lonny Chapman, Group Repertory's artistic director, the transition is complete but not flawless.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Hollywood, it seems, isn't that far removed from 19th century Russia. Nor is Philadelphia or the Texas-Oklahoma border. "Chekhov U.S.A.," at Group Repertory Theatre, transplants short plays by Anton Chekhov to American soil. Adapted and directed by Lonny Chapman, Group Repertory's artistic director, the transition is complete but not flawless.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along one wall of the Group Repertory Theatre's lobby hang four panels. On each, white adhesive letters spell the title and author of every play the company has produced. All 145 . . . and counting. In Los Angeles, the entertainment capital of the world, small theater companies can die as fast as you can say "regular guest spot on a sitcom." But Group--as GRT was first known--somehow gelled into one of the longest-lasting companies in the Valley.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Ray Loynd writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It takes courage for a theater company to tackle a classic that resists adaptation to the stage as much as "The Red Badge of Courage." Lonny Chapman's staging of Stephen Crane's novel turns the Group Repertory Theatre into a Civil War battlefield of the mind--a prudent decision, given that the major battle in the story rages inside the hero's head.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright William Inge, who would be 85 on May 3, had a troubled, unhappy life--at least at the end. He committed suicide in 1973. After having had four tremendously successful Broadway hits, all of which were turned into profitable films, Inge had an equal number of dismal failures. He couldn't have been suffering from money woes in his later years. It may be that he never got over the flops, and what he perceived as the diminishment of his gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2003
Filmmaker Henry Jaglom and Lonny Chapman, Group Repertory Theatre's artistic director emeritus, will participate in a post-show discussion following tonight's 8 p.m. opening performance of Chapman's play "The Time Is Out of Joint," at the Group Repertory Theatre, 10900 Burbank Blvd., in North Hollywood. (818) 769-7529.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One suspects that "September 10," Art Shulman's world premiere drama at the Lonny Chapman Group Repertory Theatre in North Hollywood, is an early entry in what will be a teeming field of 9/11 plays. Shulman's workable but occasionally cloying premise unites two stories--the small, personal tale of one couple's domestic disintegration, and a dramatic re-creation of the massive, world-altering events of Sept. 11, with a particular emphasis on the Twin Towers' collapse and aftermath.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along one wall of the Group Repertory Theatre's lobby hang four panels. On each, white adhesive letters spell the title and author of every play the company has produced. All 145 . . . and counting. In Los Angeles, the entertainment capital of the world, small theater companies can die as fast as you can say "regular guest spot on a sitcom." But Group--as GRT was first known--somehow gelled into one of the longest-lasting companies in the Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright William Inge, who would be 85 on May 3, had a troubled, unhappy life--at least at the end. He committed suicide in 1973. After having had four tremendously successful Broadway hits, all of which were turned into profitable films, Inge had an equal number of dismal failures. He couldn't have been suffering from money woes in his later years. It may be that he never got over the flops, and what he perceived as the diminishment of his gifts.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Ray Loynd writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It takes courage for a theater company to tackle a classic that resists adaptation to the stage as much as "The Red Badge of Courage." Lonny Chapman's staging of Stephen Crane's novel turns the Group Repertory Theatre into a Civil War battlefield of the mind--a prudent decision, given that the major battle in the story rages inside the hero's head.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
Give Lonny Chapman a red badge for persistence. It was almost 50 years ago that Chapman, artistic director of the Group Repertory Theatre, first read Stephen Crane's 1895 novel "The Red Badge of Courage." Forty-three years ago, he did a scene from it in acting class. Twenty-three years ago, he worked on it improvisationally with Jack Nicholson and Beau Bridges, and "almost got an act." One year ago, he pulled out the script and said, "I'm going to deal with this."
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
For some years now, the 38 year old Group Rep has staged productions whose standards were more on the level of community theater than professional theater.  Yet judging from its staging of Jon Robin Baitz's “The Paris Letter” at the Lonny Chapman Theatre, change is in the wind for this veteran -- if not always venerable -- company.  The fact that Jules Aaron was been tapped to direct is another indication of the theater's heartening upward...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Philip Brandes
A threatening letter from the son of the late Professor Moriarty spells trouble for the world's most famous detective in “Sherlock's Last Case” at the Lonny Chapman Theatre, but alas in this particular case the game's on the wrong foot. There have been plenty of successful reworkings of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, but Charles Marowitz's 1984 parody is not among them. Conan Doyle's iconic creation is rarely apparent in the preening, snarky caricature portrayed here by Chris Winfield.
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