Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLoompanics Unlimited
IN THE NEWS

Loompanics Unlimited

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 5, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under your Christmas tree, did you find gift-wrapped copies of "Gunrunning for Fun and Profit," "Take No Prisoners: Destroying Enemies With Dirty and Malicious Tricks," or "Above The Law: The Complete Guide to Obtaining Diplomatic Immunity" by an author called "Ambassador X"? No? Then you must not be on Michael Hoy's mailing list. Hoy, a former accountant once dubbed "Conan the Librarian," is the publisher from Hell. His company, Loompanics Unlimited of Port Townsend, Wash.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 5, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under your Christmas tree, did you find gift-wrapped copies of "Gunrunning for Fun and Profit," "Take No Prisoners: Destroying Enemies With Dirty and Malicious Tricks," or "Above The Law: The Complete Guide to Obtaining Diplomatic Immunity" by an author called "Ambassador X"? No? Then you must not be on Michael Hoy's mailing list. Hoy, a former accountant once dubbed "Conan the Librarian," is the publisher from Hell. His company, Loompanics Unlimited of Port Townsend, Wash.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only hours after the bomb that shook America, someone posted directions for a repeat performance on the Internet. It was all there--even a diagram: Mix two widely available chemicals, slap on a "booster," attach a detonator and almost anyone can have a bomb like the one being called the deadliest in U.S. history. "There you go!" boasted the Internet citizen. "Thought that might help some of you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The two ladies at the dried-flower shop suddenly seemed very nervous. Jim Hogshire, author of a book called "Opium for the Masses," had just walked in and introduced himself. They'd heard of him. Hogshire had made life difficult for the flower trade by spreading information the government would rather keep quiet--namely, that it's easy to extract opium from poppies grown in gardens across America, and even from dried poppy seedpods sold in shops like this one.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | DON OLDENBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
The hour was late, so was the deadline when the phone rang in writer Joel Rose's East Village apartment. Screeches from a dot-matrix printer had pierced ears every waking hour for weeks as it reproduced some 600 copies of Between C & D. The first edition of the small literary magazine Rose started a few months earlier with a $200 loan had struck a small nerve in Big Gotham. It sold out. Practically overnight, the apartment was deep in manuscripts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|