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OPINION
December 29, 2012
Re “ Corporate tax rate may be lowered ,” Business, Dec. 25 Republicans have agreed that loopholes should be closed for corporations. The most egregious loophole may be the one that in effect gives interest-free loans to U.S. corporations to invest overseas. I am referring to the loophole whereby they are excused from paying taxes until the money earned is “repatriated.” If the president is willing to lower the rate to competitive levels, he should insist on changes to this tax break.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | Marc Lifsher
State lawmakers have come up with a way to help California cities deal with a proliferation of massage parlors with suspected links to prostitution and human trafficking. New legislation is aimed at fixing an inadvertent loophole created by a 2008 law that created a state-sponsored council to oversee the regulation of legitimate massage therapy businesses, such as spas and clinics. The loophole led to an explosion of massage parlors in many cities. For example, their number grew by nearly 500% to 75 in the city of Huntington Beach between 2009 and 2013.
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OPINION
April 15, 2009
Payday lenders are the bottom-feeders of the financial industry, offering short-term loans with high fees to borrowers who typically live from paycheck to paycheck. Even those that play by state rules can still ensnare over- extended borrowers in debt traps. Yet some payday lenders can't seem to live with any regulation at all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Luis Rios, who lost his job at a filling station in December at the age of 56, is newly eligible for Medicaid, the healthcare program for the poor. Following the advice of state-trained medical insurance enrollment workers, he filled out the paperwork required to get coverage - but has a nagging fear that he may have put his family's financial assets at risk. That's because, in certain cases, Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid, will be able to collect repayment for healthcare services from the estate after a recipient dies, including placing government liens on property.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Santa Monica shooter John Zawahri was prevented some years ago from buying a firearm, but that didn't stop the gunman with a history of mental illness from killing five people this month in a 10-minute shooting rampage. In his column today, The Times' George Skelton notes that the shooter sprayed 100 rounds of ammunition from his home-assembled weapons and had access to 1,200 more. So where gun control failed to stop a troubled man from using a deadly weapon, Skelton wrote, bullet control could have.
OPINION
October 4, 2011
A case to be argued before the Supreme Court on Tuesday poses the question of whether a prisoner must be advised of his rights when he is interrogated inside prison walls. The court should answer yes and close an unconscionable loophole in the Miranda rule. Randall Lee Fields was in jail for disorderly conduct when he was taken by a corrections officer to a locked conference room. He was then questioned about his relationship with a man named Travis Bice, whom he had met when Bice was a minor.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Rick went to the gas station the other day. He saw that there was one price for paying in cash, another for paying with plastic. And the plastic price was 10 cents a gallon higher. He wants to know: Is that legal? Sort of. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In California, merchants are prohibited from charging a premium for using a credit card. So that would make the higher gas price illegal. But there's a big, fat loophole in the law. Check out today's Ask Laz video to find out what it is. If you have a consumer question, email me at asklaz@latimes.com or contact me via Twitter @Davidlaz .  
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The senators behind the Volcker Rule warned Friday that regulators implementing it have proposed a loophole that would have allowed JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s $2-billion trading loss. "That loophole should be closed," said Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.). Levin and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) wrote the provision in the 2010 financial reform law designed to limit trading by depositary banks for their own accounts. The Federal Reserve and other agencies are drafting the specific regulations covering that proprietary trading.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
From what I've been reading, the Santa Monica killer was packing an illegal assault rifle and 40 high-capacity ammunition magazines. He sprayed 100 bullets and had access to 1,300. And, oh yes, he was a mental case. The guy's exact background and how he obtained his war-ready arsenal weren't clear as of this writing. But, regardless, there are at least two possible and troubling scenarios. John Zawahri may have been an "innocent law-abiding citizen" until he wasn't - until he murdered his dad and brother, then three others randomly during a 10-minute rampage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed legislation that closes a loophole in California's rape law by clarifying that an attacker who impersonates someone else to coerce a victim into sexual activity can be prosecuted. The bill was in response to a recent State Court of Appeals decision that overturned a rape conviction of a Los Angeles County man in which the court said a victim had not been raped because she was unmarried and the attacker had impersonated her boyfriend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Rosanna Xia, Rong-Gong Lin II and Doug Smith
A state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would close a loophole that has allowed developers to build projects on or near dangerous earthquake faults. California law already bans the construction of new buildings on top of faults that have been zoned by the state. But more than two dozen major faults have not been zoned, and a Times review found some buildings had been constructed along them. Statewide, about 2,000 of California's 7,000 miles of faults have not been zoned, and the building ban is not enforced in those areas.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Companies that make generic drugs, the medications most Americans buy, are fighting to kill a proposed federal regulation that would require them for the first time to warn patients of all the known health risks of each drug they sell. The proposed rule change by the Food and Drug Administration "would be nothing short of catastrophic," said Ralph G. Neas, president of the Generic Pharmaceutical Assn., an industry trade group. It could raise healthcare costs and "create dangerous confusion" for doctors and patients, he said.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Rick went to the gas station the other day. He saw that there was one price for paying in cash, another for paying with plastic. And the plastic price was 10 cents a gallon higher. He wants to know: Is that legal? Sort of. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In California, merchants are prohibited from charging a premium for using a credit card. So that would make the higher gas price illegal. But there's a big, fat loophole in the law. Check out today's Ask Laz video to find out what it is. If you have a consumer question, email me at asklaz@latimes.com or contact me via Twitter @Davidlaz .  
OPINION
November 19, 2013 | By Harvey Rosenfield
"We didn't do a good enough job in terms of how we crafted the law," an apologetic President Obama said this month, shortly after millions of Americans got notices from their health insurance companies that their current policies were going to be canceled because the policies didn't comply with the minimum standards of the Affordable Care Act. Worse, the federal website where people were supposed to be able to buy replacement coverage was still barely...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | Patrick McGreevy
A federal allegation that state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon tried to hide a $25,000 bribe in a charity run by his brother has shed light on the use of nonprofits by California legislators to collect cash out of public view. Some nonprofits, set up with the stated purpose of aiding a charitable or social cause, are also being used to benefit an elected official's career, public image or personal finances, say advocates for open government. Several current and former California politicians or their relatives have established nonprofits in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Labor and community advocacy groups staged a brief sit-in outside the office of Los Angeles County's chief executive Friday calling on the county to scrutinize the property tax assessments of a major downtown property owner. The activists from the ReFund LA Coalition say commercial property giant Brookfield Office Properties structured its recent acquisition of four downtown skyscrapers   to take advantage of a tax loophole and avoid having the properties reassessed at fair market value as required by Proposition 13 when a change of ownership occurs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Councilwoman Joy Picus, who represents the west San Fernando Valley, on Wednesday sought to close a loophole in the city's zoning code that allows construction of more than one home on a large residential lot without public hearings.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
A controversial $40-billion government program to buy toxic securities from ailing banks has a flaw that law enforcement and financial experts say could allow traders to illegally profit from inside information. Critics of the program say that without adequate safeguards, traders could use the tens of billions of dollars provided by the government to manipulate prices and exploit the price swings in other trades. Because the government is providing 75% of the program's money -- $30 billion -- the manipulations could lead to significant losses by taxpayers.
OPINION
October 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Why did Gov. Jerry Brown bother signing a law to encourage childhood vaccinations if his immediate intent was to undermine it? With rising numbers of parents succumbing to discredited fears that childhood inoculations cause autism, AB 2109 was supposed to tighten the state's lax rules that allow parents to exempt their children from vaccinations based on "personal belief. " Under the law, parents could still send their children to public school without the vaccinations, but first they would have to submit a form signed by a health professional showing that they had been informed about the risks and benefits of immunization.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Provisions of California's landmark Proposition 13 property tax measure are stoking ire again as reform activists say a high-profile commercial property deal is being structured to avoid tax increases by taking advantage of a loophole. A group of unions and anti-poverty organizations accuses real estate giant Brookfield Office Properties Inc. of trying to skate on potentially millions of dollars in new property taxes on downtown Los Angeles skyscrapers the company is buying by taking less than a 50% stake in a new entity that will take title to the properties and others now held by Brookfield.
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