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Looting Kuwait

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NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From The Washington Post
A week after the Iraqi invasion, there is no sign of any civil administration, Kuwaiti or Iraqi, and Kuwait's 1.7 million residents are nervous about their fate, according to information received by the Washington Post. The real fear among Kuwaitis and Westerners in Kuwait, according to information about events there this week, is of an attack to oust the Iraqis, or of retaliation against them if Baghdad, the Iraqi capital, is attacked.
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NEWS
March 6, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a flurry of concessions to Kuwait and its allied liberators, Iraq officially renounced its annexation of the war-ravaged emirate on Tuesday and vowed to return hundreds of millions of dollars worth of looted property, including nearly a dozen civilian jetliners, gold taken from a Central Bank vault and scores of priceless museum pieces. Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz announced the measures in a letter to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
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NEWS
October 5, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the Bibi Saleh Center in downtown Kuwait city has been a haven for wealthy foreigners and Kuwaiti playboys and their girlfriends, a symbol of the oil-rich emirate's penchant for the pleasures of life. But in the two months since Iraq seized Kuwait, the four-towered condominium complex has become a cornerstone of Kuwait's brutal subjugation, according to reliable sources fleeing the country.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the Bibi Saleh Center in downtown Kuwait city has been a haven for wealthy foreigners and Kuwaiti playboys and their girlfriends, a symbol of the oil-rich emirate's penchant for the pleasures of life. But in the two months since Iraq seized Kuwait, the four-towered condominium complex has become a cornerstone of Kuwait's brutal subjugation, according to reliable sources fleeing the country.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a flurry of concessions to Kuwait and its allied liberators, Iraq officially renounced its annexation of the war-ravaged emirate on Tuesday and vowed to return hundreds of millions of dollars worth of looted property, including nearly a dozen civilian jetliners, gold taken from a Central Bank vault and scores of priceless museum pieces. Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz announced the measures in a letter to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990
Even in a world where abusive government is all too often the norm, Iraq's tyrannical regime has long stood out for the singular brutality of its repressive rule.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior minister in the deposed Kuwaiti government declared Friday that Kuwait's royal family does not favor war as the first means of liberating his country. Sheik Ali al Khalifa al Sabah, the Kuwaiti finance minister, told reporters that the exile government has enough wealth to maintain itself "for a very long time." "We are not gung-ho for war, we never were and never will be," Ali said, pointing out that in war "our citizens would be the first ones to be killed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991
The U.N. Security Council is preparing to do the right thing by emphatically rejecting Iraq's plea for a five-year moratorium on reparations payments stemming from its war of aggression. A draft resolution now before the 15-nation body instead threatens to maintain sanctions on Iraq indefinitely unless Saddam Hussein's regime meets the conditions contained in the council's April 3 cease-fire resolution.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials have begun cataloguing alleged violations of international law by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein for future use at a possible Nuremberg-style war crimes trial, Bush Administration sources said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991
More than 300,000 Palestinians lived in Kuwait before Iraq invaded last Aug. 2. Perhaps 75,000 remain, although the total may be larger if in fact Iraq has moved thousands of Palestinians into the country to replace Kuwaitis who were killed or fled. The fate of these Palestinians is a matter of concern to Washington. The fear is that when Kuwait City is liberated the Palestinians there could face a blood bath at the hands of vengeful Kuwaitis.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From The Washington Post
A week after the Iraqi invasion, there is no sign of any civil administration, Kuwaiti or Iraqi, and Kuwait's 1.7 million residents are nervous about their fate, according to information received by the Washington Post. The real fear among Kuwaitis and Westerners in Kuwait, according to information about events there this week, is of an attack to oust the Iraqis, or of retaliation against them if Baghdad, the Iraqi capital, is attacked.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration policy-makers are intensely studying a rash of confusing signals from occupied Kuwait that could indicate an Iraqi plan to withdraw from part of the country, officials said Monday. At the same time, however, Bush and his senior aides continue to issue bellicose warnings about Iraqi atrocities in Kuwait--warnings that one official said are part of a deliberate campaign to prepare the American people for the possibility of military action against Iraqi forces.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign at the main border checkpoint into Kuwait says, "Welcome," but it tilts crazily to one side, and beyond it stretches newly liberated southern Kuwait: an eerie panorama of devastation and spring clover, of a sudden, fleeting violence that passed over the landscape and moved on. On the coastal desert plains that frame the main highway from Saudi Arabia to Kuwait city, an occasional donkey grazes amid the blown-out wreckage of tanks and supply trucks.
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