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Lopez Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1995
The fate of the Lopez Canyon dump site is before the Los Angeles City Council for the umpteenth time. At one time, Valley rubbish was dumped into city sites outside the Valley. Lopez Canyon was established as a dump site to reduce the amount of rubbish dumped at Mission Canyon and other city sites as well to reduce costs by dumping Valley rubbish closer to home. However, today all those other sites are closed and Lopez Canyon, instead of just taking its share, as had been agreed, is forced to accept 85% of all the city's rubbish.
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OPINION
May 23, 2011
Nobody likes to live near a landfill. But somebody has to. The residents of the northeastern San Fernando Valley who ring the grassy expanse of Lopez Canyon, once one of the city's biggest garbage dumps, lived unhappily with this industrial intrusion for two decades. From 1975 to 1996, trucks rumbled across the 400-acre property, dumping a total of 16.5 million tons of trash. After it closed, the city promised the long-suffering residents that the land would be designated as open space and, when environmentally safe, would be turned into a park and recreation area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | TIM MAY
The state agency that regulates landfill safety will begin a review of operations at Lopez Canyon Landfill in Lake View Terrace, the last dump owned by the city of Los Angeles still in operation, officials said Wednesday. The action, taken by the state Integrated Waste Management board, was announced by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) on Wednesday and comes as city sanitation officials press for a new five-year operating permit for the controversial landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
Wild grass grows on the hillsides of Lopez Canyon. Deer stop to munch before galloping away. To the north spread the mountains of the Angeles National Forest. Lopez Canyon doesn't look like a dump, but it was one for 21 years until it took its last load of garbage in 1996. Those who live in the surrounding northeastern San Fernando Valley have for decades felt like their home has been the dumping ground of choice for dismantled automobiles, recyclables and all sorts of other garbage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
The California Waste Management Board on Thursday directed Los Angeles County to close Lopez Canyon Landfill until testing determines whether fumes that sickened city sanitation workers last week continue to be dangerous. However, an official with the county Health Services Department, which acts as the state's local agent for landfill review, refused to carry out the order against the city's only public landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995
One item which is continually brought up in arguments opposing Lopez Canyon is landfill gas emissions ("Proposal for King Beating Site Criticized," Aug. 16). The landfill is required by the South Coast Air Quality Management District to keep emissions under 500 parts per million. In any given month, approximately six to 12 events are recorded in which emission exceedances are noted and subsequently fixed. Contrary to the opinions of many landfill opponents, an emission exceedance, or "hot spot" of this nature, does not equal a violation as defined by the AQMD.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | From Times wire services
The wreckage of a small plane with its dead pilot inside was found early today in the Lopez Canyon dump, officials said. The single-engine plane was found about 7 a.m. north of Lake View Terrace in the rural foothills of the northeastern San Fernando Valley, Fire Department spokesman Jim Williamson said. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Fred O'Donnell said the plane was a Grumman AA5-A, a small metal aircraft. The male pilot's name was not immediately available, Williamson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council voted 14 to 0 Tuesday to approve spending $700,000 to install up to 200 additional wells to ease methane gas emission problems at its Lopez Canyon dump in Lake View Terrace. The council acted, without debate, amid growing criticism of the city's efforts to expand operations at Lopez Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1985
Afire whipped by hot winds blackened more than 450 acres of brushland in Lopez Canyon north of Sylmar on Friday, sending plumes of smoke over the northeastern San Fernando Valley but causing no injuries or damage to structures, authorities said. Late Friday night, about 250 firefighters from three departments were battling the fire, which broke out in a rugged, inaccessible area at 4:15 p.m., Los Angeles County Fire Department Capt. James Nelson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
State officials Tuesday rejected as too lenient a Los Angeles County order restricting use of Lopez Canyon Landfill, owned by the city of Los Angeles, and asked the county to draft a tougher version by the end of the day today. "We didn't feel that it did what we asked them to do," said Chris Peck, spokesman for the California Waste Management Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lopez Canyon Landfill used to be an old-fashioned environmental nuisance--home to trash trucks, rats and an unpleasant smell. Today, the closed northeast Valley dump is the site or one of Los Angeles' most closely watched green energy projects: a Department of Water and Power initiative to convert gas given off by rotting garbage into electricity using low-emission jet engines known as microturbines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 33rd annual Christmas parade here was a hit, an extravaganza of Mexican folk dancers and marching bands, vintage cars and charro riders on horseback, all brought to you by . . . the Lopez Canyon Landfill. In a strange twist to the tale of the 400-acre landfill moldering under a blanket of dirt in Lake View Terrace, Councilman Alex Padilla helped pay for the holiday parade by dipping into a fund set aside almost a decade ago to ease the pain of neighbors living beside the now-closed dump.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999
"For Lopez Canyon Landfill Neighbors, a Long Goodbye," Dec. 4. For seven years, Assemblyman Richard Katz labored with and on behalf of his constituents to have the Lopez Canyon dump closed. With no help from then-Councilman [Richard] Alarcon, he finally achieved California state closure. After the state's decision, the City Council, including Alarcon, kicking, screaming and dragging their feet, finally acceded. Of course Alarcon took full credit for the battle and the victory during his shoddy campaign for the state Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Showalter is talking about the noisy trucks that used to ferry trash to the nearby Lopez Canyon Landfill when he suddenly leaps from his chair and points out the window. On the hillside outside his modest wood shake home, a black-and-tan bobcat stops and looks in his direction before bolting into the brush. "Look, can you see it?" he says, trying to get his wife, Shannon, to pull herself away from "Oprah." "It's right there on the hill. It's right there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1998
Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon introduced a motion Friday to distribute the latest series of donations for community services springing from the closure of Lopez Canyon Landfill. The proposed allocations total about $1 million. The money is part of about $3 million that the city and the landfill operator agreed to donate to the Lopez Canyon Community Amenities Trust Fund, created to help neighborhoods around the now-closed landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1998 | HOLLY EDWARDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Given a choice, many folks would prefer living next door to rolling hills of manicured greens than beside mounds of dirt-covered garbage. But Ralph Burns, who lives near Lopez Canyon Landfill, isn't sold on a city proposal to build a golf course on top of the dump. "I don't like it," Burns said of the idea. "With the landfill settling and all the hills and trash in there, I just don't think it's a good place for a golf course." And Burns is not the only one worried.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Showalter is talking about the noisy trucks that used to ferry trash to the nearby Lopez Canyon Landfill when he suddenly leaps from his chair and points out the window. On the hillside outside his modest wood shake home, a black-and-tan bobcat stops and looks in his direction before bolting into the brush. "Look, can you see it?" he says, trying to get his wife, Shannon, to pull herself away from "Oprah." "It's right there on the hill. It's right there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | ERIC RIMBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I am an administrator for the Forester Haven California Retirement Center and Nursing Home, which is on North Lopez Canyon Road. Part of the road has washed away and is covered with uneven patches and potholes. In fact, a couple of weeks ago, I had a car accident in which I hit an unpaved patch of road. I have been trying to get the road fixed for at least two months but have been passed around to more than five people in various government departments.
SPORTS
October 6, 1996 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ability to keep their competitive cool on a hot day helped seniors David Lopez of Hoover High and Julie Harris of Canyon to Division I victories Saturday in the Kenny Staub Invitational cross-country meet at Crescenta Valley Park. Lopez trailed Manuel Lopez of Belmont by nine seconds after the first mile of the boys' race, but won by 33 seconds with a time of 15 minutes 54 seconds over the three-mile course.
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