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Lopez Canyon Landfill

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989
The South Coast Air Quality Management District will consider July 12 whether to give the city of Los Angeles additional time to install a $1-million system to burn off gas generated by the Lopez Canyon landfill, where two workers were overcome by gas earlier this year. AQMD staff members recommended that if the city does get an extension, a warning should be issued that the city will be taken to court if the new deadline is not met. The city has been given one six-month extension--to July 1--to install the system at its dump above Lake View Terrace.
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OPINION
May 23, 2011
Nobody likes to live near a landfill. But somebody has to. The residents of the northeastern San Fernando Valley who ring the grassy expanse of Lopez Canyon, once one of the city's biggest garbage dumps, lived unhappily with this industrial intrusion for two decades. From 1975 to 1996, trucks rumbled across the 400-acre property, dumping a total of 16.5 million tons of trash. After it closed, the city promised the long-suffering residents that the land would be designated as open space and, when environmentally safe, would be turned into a park and recreation area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990
Regarding the Aug. 21 article on Lopez Canyon landfill, I have never read such a crock. On the one hand, we have the Air Quality Management District, which is suppose to make a decision based on health and safety factors regarding the surrounding communities. On the other hand, we have the city of Los Angeles clouding the issues and making predictions of so-called budget cuts and the piling up of garbage if Lopez Canyon landfill is closed. I hope the AQMD will not make the wrong decision based on city pressure, but call their bluff, so in my opinion we could all see how the Sanitation Department and the city has been lying to us. JERRY ZIMMER Lake View Terrace
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
Wild grass grows on the hillsides of Lopez Canyon. Deer stop to munch before galloping away. To the north spread the mountains of the Angeles National Forest. Lopez Canyon doesn't look like a dump, but it was one for 21 years until it took its last load of garbage in 1996. Those who live in the surrounding northeastern San Fernando Valley have for decades felt like their home has been the dumping ground of choice for dismantled automobiles, recyclables and all sorts of other garbage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER
The Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation will do a feasibility study on an alternative plan for the permanent closure of a portion of Lopez Canyon Landfill that is filled to capacity with trash, a city official said Thursday. Residents of nearby Lake View Terrace and Kagle Canyon had objected to a plan submitted by the bureau because a ridgeline would have been removed to make room for a road for trucks doing closure work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992
The Los Angeles Planning Commission on Tuesday approved construction of five more flares to burn off methane gas emissions at the Lopez Canyon Landfill, bringing the total number of flares at the dump to nine. In response to community concerns, the commission also asked the city Bureau of Sanitation to report in 30 to 45 days on its progress in constructing an underground pipe to drain excess water that flows off the landfill and onto neighborhood streets during heavy rains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989
Lopez Canyon Landfill, in a once-remote area of the northeast San Fernando Valley, has been criticized recently for odors, noise and its ever-expanding mass. Residents sought to shut the dump three times in recent months by blocking its entrance. The city maintains that the landfill is safe and is essential for waste disposal. On March 8, an unexpected gas release hospitalized four workers. That incited a short-lived state order that the landfill be shut. Rob Zapple, 36, is a carpenter and actor who has lived in Kagel Canyon, which abuts the so-called B face of the landfill, since 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Showalter is talking about the noisy trucks that used to ferry trash to the nearby Lopez Canyon Landfill when he suddenly leaps from his chair and points out the window. On the hillside outside his modest wood shake home, a black-and-tan bobcat stops and looks in his direction before bolting into the brush. "Look, can you see it?" he says, trying to get his wife, Shannon, to pull herself away from "Oprah." "It's right there on the hill. It's right there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1992
The Planning Commission voted 4-0 this week to temporarily allow increased dumping at the Lopez Canyon landfill to accommodate the debris and garbage that resulted from the rioting and looting triggered by the Rodney King verdicts. Under the plan approved Thursday at the request of the city's Bureau of Sanitation, the huge city-owned landfill in Lake View Terrace will be open for dumping Saturday and May 16. The dump is usually closed on weekends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The City Council agreed Friday to work on a plan that may create park and recreation space on and around the closed Lopez Canyon Landfill in Lake View Terrace. City Councilman Richard Alarcon said that the ideas include a park on the outskirts and a golf range where the dump is still settling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lopez Canyon Landfill used to be an old-fashioned environmental nuisance--home to trash trucks, rats and an unpleasant smell. Today, the closed northeast Valley dump is the site or one of Los Angeles' most closely watched green energy projects: a Department of Water and Power initiative to convert gas given off by rotting garbage into electricity using low-emission jet engines known as microturbines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 33rd annual Christmas parade here was a hit, an extravaganza of Mexican folk dancers and marching bands, vintage cars and charro riders on horseback, all brought to you by . . . the Lopez Canyon Landfill. In a strange twist to the tale of the 400-acre landfill moldering under a blanket of dirt in Lake View Terrace, Councilman Alex Padilla helped pay for the holiday parade by dipping into a fund set aside almost a decade ago to ease the pain of neighbors living beside the now-closed dump.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 33rd annual Christmas parade in Pacoima was a hit, an extravaganza of Mexican folk dancers and marching bands, vintage cars and charro riders on horseback, all brought to you by . . . the Lopez Canyon landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999
"For Lopez Canyon Landfill Neighbors, a Long Goodbye," Dec. 4. For seven years, Assemblyman Richard Katz labored with and on behalf of his constituents to have the Lopez Canyon dump closed. With no help from then-Councilman [Richard] Alarcon, he finally achieved California state closure. After the state's decision, the City Council, including Alarcon, kicking, screaming and dragging their feet, finally acceded. Of course Alarcon took full credit for the battle and the victory during his shoddy campaign for the state Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Showalter is talking about the noisy trucks that used to ferry trash to the nearby Lopez Canyon Landfill when he suddenly leaps from his chair and points out the window. On the hillside outside his modest wood shake home, a black-and-tan bobcat stops and looks in his direction before bolting into the brush. "Look, can you see it?" he says, trying to get his wife, Shannon, to pull herself away from "Oprah." "It's right there on the hill. It's right there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999
Re "Sunshine Canyon Landfill Expansion," Letters to the Valley Edition, Feb. 28. Had [Larry] Naramore bothered to check, he would have seen that I supported [Richard] Alarcon's office as an active member of both the North Valley Coalition and LASER [Landfill Alternatives Save Environmental Resources], to close Lopez Canyon Landfill. I also testified at public meetings. I did this because I do not believe that any dump should be located close to residences. If it were not for Bradley Landfill closing within three years, I would be fighting to close that, if asked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1999
The Los Angeles Board of Recreation and Park commissioners on Wednesday put off granting the city's Bureau of Sanitation the authority to develop a golf course atop the closed Lopez Canyon Landfill. The move delays the release of a bid request for the development of the golf course, proposed for about 55 acres at the site. Former Councilman Richard Alarcon had supported the golf course as a beneficial use for the landfill, which stopped accepting trash in 1996.
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