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Lopez Ranch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
It's probably the only ranch in Los Angeles that's half a block from an automated teller machine. Behind the cow shed and the fruit pickers' trailers, where Crescenciano Lopez once harvested giant pumpkins, rises the new five-story headquarters of a multinational corporation. Farther down the street, a business park shadows land that used to be his cornfields.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
It's probably the only ranch in Los Angeles that's half a block from an automated teller machine. Behind the cow shed and the fruit pickers' trailers, where Crescenciano Lopez once harvested giant pumpkins, rises the new five-story headquarters of a multinational corporation. Farther down the street, a business park shadows land that used to be his cornfields.
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NEWS
March 24, 1988 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Rapid Transit District officials today will recommend that a plan backed by Councilwoman Ruth Galanter to build a bus maintenance yard in Westchester be abandoned because the proposal was rejected by neighbors. The 11-member transit board of directors is scheduled to vote on the recommendation, contained in a staff report dated today, at the RTD's downtown headquarters this afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1988
The Southern California Rapid Transit District board of directors has voted unanimously to abandon a plan backed by City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter to build a bus maintenance facility on the site of a drive-in theater in Westchester.
FOOD
July 1, 1993 | KATHIE JENKINS
Fresh sweet corn, the kind that is picked the same day you plan to cook it, is simply not available at the supermarket--or at many vegetable stands, for that matter. A lot of stands that sell corn buy it from other producers. Not all of the following places are located out in the countryside, but they do guarantee that they grow their own corn. * Cavion Farms--Exit Highway 60 at Mountain Avenue, Ontario. (909) 983-7813. 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
FOOD
July 5, 1996
Boccali's restaurant, 3277 Ojai Ave. (stand is in front of restaurant), Ojai; (805) 647-3300. Open 11:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. daily. Central Market, 1012 W. Ventura Blvd. (off Highway 101 at Central Avenue), Camarillo; (805) 983-1211. Open 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Cicero Farms, 22600 Sherman Way (between Shoup and Fallbrook avenues), West Hills; (818) 346-6338. Open 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily.
FOOD
July 5, 1996 | MARGARET SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Charlie Lopez was a younger man, the day after the Fourth of July was only slightly less tiring than the holiday itself. As they did on most hot summer days, he and his 11 siblings would wake early to pick corn from their father's 18-acre property to be sold at the family farm stand on Jefferson Boulevard in Playa del Rey. "On the Fourth, we'd get really busy near closing with last-minute shoppers," says Lopez, now 60. "The cars wouldn't stop coming.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Don Galleano swivels his chair away from a cluttered roll-top desk, stands up and walks past a skinned rattlesnake on the wall. He slides by two rifles propped up in the corner of his office and out the swinging door into dusty terrain where twisting and gnarled Zinfandel vines have been growing for nearly a century.
MAGAZINE
August 20, 1989 | JANEY MILSTEAD
IT'S SWEET-CORN season, but with more condos than cornfields dotting our landscape, the delights of dining on fresh corn are largely lost to those who don't know where to find it. Fresh sweet corn, according to connoisseurs such as the wistful ex-Midwesterner who recalls his mother boiling the water and then sending him out to pick the corn, is simply not available at the supermarket.
TRAVEL
September 7, 2003 | Susan Lendroth, Special to The Times
Far below the twists and turns of Highway 154, the Pacific shimmered like a mirror in the sunset. "Goodbye, ocean," called my 8-year-old daughter, Kyla, when the water slipped from view. I too felt wistful at the thought of cool sea breezes as we drove away from the coast last month and toward Rancho Oso, a guest ranch in the golden hills northwest of Santa Barbara. Inland temperatures were expected to soar to 100. But we soldiered on, following signs to the ranch's check-in gate.
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