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Loren Freeman

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A row of extravagant hats, wigs and giant feathered who-knows-whats is perched on the ledge above the mirror. Actor Loren Freeman sits in front of the glass, facing a dressing table filled with containers of colored goop, as he paints layer upon layer of the stuff on his face. The nightly transformation into agent Sylvia St. Croix, his role (and the only cross-dressed part) in "Ruthless!"--a musical at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills--is no quickie. Sylvia is a vamp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A row of extravagant hats, wigs and giant feathered who-knows-whats is perched on the ledge above the mirror. Actor Loren Freeman sits in front of the glass, facing a dressing table filled with containers of colored goop, as he paints layer upon layer of the stuff on his face. The nightly transformation into agent Sylvia St. Croix, his role (and the only cross-dressed part) in "Ruthless!"--a musical at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills--is no quickie. Sylvia is a vamp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
KTTV Channel 11 begins airing a new syndicated series Sunday. It's called "What a Dummy." And how. Premiering at 6:30 p.m., "What a Dummy" refers to a red-mopped ventriloquist's dummy named Buzz, who turns up in an old trunk that a deceased vaudevillian has bequeathed to the Brannigan family of New Jersey. The high jinks really hit the fan when Buzz talks on his own: "So, tell me, kid, where the hell am I?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1993 | LARRY GELBART, Gelbart is an award-winning playwright and screenwriter whose works for stage, film and television include "City of Angels," "Tootsie" and the TV series "MASH." and
Whether by chance or by design, it would appear that the Los Angeles Times has adopted a policy of diminishing Theater in Los Angeles, at least in the case of productions presented in small and mid-size venues. With the odd rare exception, it seems as if the only theatrical works considered worthy of front (or near front) page coverage are the big ones, the imports from New York or from London. A case in point is "Ruthless!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Adaptation for the stage does not mean transliteration, but a host of more subtle events: shifts in mood, texture, color, essence. Take the adaptation of David Galloway's novel "Melody Jones" by Dan Gerrity and Jeremy Lawrence that is currently on stage at the Cast-at-the-Circle Theatre in Hollywood. Like the 1976 novel, it is more a series of monologues than a play. It focuses on plenty of onstage striptease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A lot of us grew up, more or less, in the vicinity of Hal Linden. There he was, on the early '60s "Anything Goes" cast album as Billy Crocker, adjusting his bow tie and grinning. There he was, eight seasons on "Barney Miller," for which Linden won three Emmys as the stalwart center of a strong situation comedy. Even in less interesting ventures, Linden has proven a genial, versatile, classy presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
The costumes by Bob Mackie might be enough reason to see "Ruthless!," the new show at the Canon Theatre. These are grand, brightly colored overstatements in feathers, froufrou and flimflam, usually topped by cartoonish wigs sprayed into terminal unbreakability (the work of Joann Komin). But then there's more. Like subtle lighting by Michael Gilliam and witty sets by Lawrence Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Some shows, you leave humming the scenery; others, the costumes. "Howard Crabtree's When Pigs Fly" sends you out humming the sequins on the costumes. The wigs alone in this exuberant eyeful of a revue, now making its Los Angeles debut at the Coronet Theatre, are like tone poems of camp: pillowy, cartoon-land creations, threatening to lift the men beneath them somewhere, fully aloft. These wigs are big. They're also witty enough to be spun off into their own series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Despite its satirical jabs at the war on drugs, "Reefer Madness!" may be the most respectable show in town. The long-running musical at Hudson Backstage Theatre gathered eight nominations for this year's Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle awards--more than any other single show. The recognition follows the production's leveling of the competition at last fall's Ovation Awards, five of which were won by "Reefer."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Link is a gifted director who is sometimes called upon to helm mediocre material. However, when Link's pyrotechnical signature style ignites a play worthy of his talents, the result can be dazzling. Set in a Buffalo strip club in the early 1970s, Dan Gerrity and Jeremy Lawrence's "Melody Jones," now at Theatre/Theater, struts a fine line between craft and crassness.
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