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Loren J Shriver

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April 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Charles F. Bolden, 43, who served as a combat pilot with the Marine Corps in Vietnam, knows exactly what he will be doing as the world's most pampered piece of hardware is lifted slowly out of the shuttle Discovery's payload bay this week. "I will just sit there and hold my breath," says a man who flew more than 100 missions over Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
April 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Charles F. Bolden, 43, who served as a combat pilot with the Marine Corps in Vietnam, knows exactly what he will be doing as the world's most pampered piece of hardware is lifted slowly out of the shuttle Discovery's payload bay this week. "I will just sit there and hold my breath," says a man who flew more than 100 missions over Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
The Hubble Space Telescope orbited with its big eye open today after ground controllers overcame communications problems and lifted its lens cover. The shuttle Discovery's astronauts prepared for Sunday's return to Earth. "You've been released from Hubble support. It's on its own," Mission Control's Story Musgrave told the five crew members. "That's great news," replied Discovery commander Loren J. Shriver.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | from United Press International
Countdown clocks resumed ticking Saturday for the shuttle Discovery's delayed launch Tuesday to boost the $1.5-billion Hubble Space Telescope into orbit. Engineers also readied the shuttle Columbia for rollout to its launch pad today for a May flight. Discovery's carefully scripted countdown began on time at 3 p.m. The ship's five-member crew is set to blast off at 5:31 a.m.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | from United Press International
The shuttle Discovery's crew flew back to Florida on Sunday for blastoff Tuesday on a critical flight to carry the $1.5-billion Hubble Space Telescope into orbit, 14 days late because of hydraulic problems. "Well, here we are again!" Discovery skipper Loren J. Shriver said shortly after the crew arrived. "We feel very confident that things are going to go well this time."
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Launch crews moved steadily through the countdown Thursday in preparation for the launching of the space shuttle Atlantis, aiming for a liftoff at 6:56 a.m. PDT today. They delayed a rollback of the service structure around the vehicle for eight hours so that technicians could relieve a pressure buildup in a tank serving an auxiliary maneuvering unit, but with that problem fixed they were to begin fueling its gigantic external tank with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen shortly after midnight.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The much-delayed launch of the Hubble Space Telescope was back on track Monday, and officials expected the space shuttle Discovery to blast off at around 5:31 a.m. PDT today. "The astronomers are starting to tingle again," Lennard A. Fisk, chief scientist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said Monday.
NEWS
January 24, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The space shuttle Discovery rode on searing flames into orbit this afternoon, carrying a secret military cargo intended to boost the nation's ability to spy on Soviet communications. The launch into a sky marred only by the slightest wisps of clouds took place under unprecedented security for a shuttle operation, intended to foil attempts to determine the nature of the mysterious mission by hiding its launch time until the final nine minutes of the countdown. The launch was flawless.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Discovery astronauts triumphantly launched the $1.5-billion Hubble Space Telescope one orbit late today after last-ditch commands from Earth freed a stuck solar panel, narrowly averting a daring emergency spacewalk. The telescope began orbiting Earth every 97.3 minutes at an altitude of 380 miles--high above the atmosphere, which has limited the view of ground-based telescopes. "Discovery, go for Hubble release," Mission Control told the crew at 12:37 p.m. PDT.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
The astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis packed up Friday after a vexing week in space in which they failed to accomplish their main goal: reeling out a satellite on 12 1/2 miles of tether. "Unfortunately in the space exploration business, we have to put all our eggs in one basket sometimes and try to do it all," shuttle pilot Andrew Allen said in a space-to-ground news conference.
NEWS
January 24, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
As ice that delayed launch of the space shuttle Discovery by 24 hours melted away Wednesday, NASA said all systems tied to the craft and its launching gear were ready for the postponed liftoff today.
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