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Loretta Devine

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Loretta Devine, star of the Old Globe's smash hit, "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill," used to compete with herself Friday nights, performing live at the Cassius Carter Centre Stage at the same time her new series, "Sugar and Spice," was being seen on television. As it turns out, "Sugar and Spice" wasn't picked up, but "Lady Day" has been--by a producer in Montclair, N.J., who flew into town to check out the show and fell in love with it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
The creative forces behind the L.A. premiere of Pearl Cleage's "Blues for an Alabama Sky," opening Saturday at downtown's Los Angeles Theatre Center (LATC), knew that entering L.A.'s challenging theater scene was, at some point, going to require jumping off a very steep cliff. They just didn't know they were going to get pushed--and so soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
George Michael better watch out. The Divine Miss L. is out to track him down. "I heard that George Michael is using some of my voice tracks on his new album," Loretta Devine joked last week in talking about the musical number she and the singer perform during tonight's season finale of ABC's "Eli Stone." "Well, if he does, he's going to have to pay me," punctuating the line with one of her trademark high-pitched giggles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996
Regarding Kenneth Turan's discussion of possible Oscar nominees ("To the Moon, Oscar!," Jan. 7), I would hope that excellent "smaller" performances by less well-known actors might be considered, even when those performances cannot summon the heavy budgets for promotion. I think particularly of the fine, grounded, very human work of Loretta Devine in "Waiting to Exhale" and the splendid, live and very real work of Mike McGlone in "The Brothers McMullen." GORDON COHN Long Beach Turan omitted any mention of "Babe," which topped his own 10-best list.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
George Michael better watch out. The Divine Miss L. is out to track him down. "I heard that George Michael is using some of my voice tracks on his new album," Loretta Devine joked last week in talking about the musical number she and the singer perform during tonight's season finale of ABC's "Eli Stone." "Well, if he does, he's going to have to pay me," punctuating the line with one of her trademark high-pitched giggles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
To convey the sadness of blues singer Billie Holiday's last months, Loretta Devine, a star on the ascent, has to dig deep into her past for some painful memories. "I have to go to the weakest part of myself," said Devine, speaking in a soft, almost little-girl voice. "I have to go into the negative part of my thinking to get to her.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cabaret is often compared, inaccurately, to jazz or nightclub music. But it is neither specifically focused, as jazz is, upon the music, nor, as nightclub performances are, upon the personality of the artist. Cabaret is about storytelling, and Loretta Devine's appearance at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill on New Year's Eve in a performance called "Coming Home . . . With Love" revealed how alive and relevant the genre can be in the hands of an imaginative young singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
HEALTH
May 9, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Neurosurgeons at Seattle Grace Hospital are conducting a clinical trial of a new treatment for patients with "rapidly progressive Alzheimer's disease. " Some of the patients in the trial are randomly assigned to receive the experimental drug and others are given a placebo. The patients don't know which group they are in, but the doctors find out when they unseal an envelope in the operating room just before inserting the syringe into the patient's brain. Dr. Meredith Grey (Ellen Pompeo)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
The creative forces behind the L.A. premiere of Pearl Cleage's "Blues for an Alabama Sky," opening Saturday at downtown's Los Angeles Theatre Center (LATC), knew that entering L.A.'s challenging theater scene was, at some point, going to require jumping off a very steep cliff. They just didn't know they were going to get pushed--and so soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cabaret is often compared, inaccurately, to jazz or nightclub music. But it is neither specifically focused, as jazz is, upon the music, nor, as nightclub performances are, upon the personality of the artist. Cabaret is about storytelling, and Loretta Devine's appearance at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill on New Year's Eve in a performance called "Coming Home . . . With Love" revealed how alive and relevant the genre can be in the hands of an imaginative young singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996
Regarding Kenneth Turan's discussion of possible Oscar nominees ("To the Moon, Oscar!," Jan. 7), I would hope that excellent "smaller" performances by less well-known actors might be considered, even when those performances cannot summon the heavy budgets for promotion. I think particularly of the fine, grounded, very human work of Loretta Devine in "Waiting to Exhale" and the splendid, live and very real work of Mike McGlone in "The Brothers McMullen." GORDON COHN Long Beach Turan omitted any mention of "Babe," which topped his own 10-best list.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Loretta Devine, star of the Old Globe's smash hit, "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill," used to compete with herself Friday nights, performing live at the Cassius Carter Centre Stage at the same time her new series, "Sugar and Spice," was being seen on television. As it turns out, "Sugar and Spice" wasn't picked up, but "Lady Day" has been--by a producer in Montclair, N.J., who flew into town to check out the show and fell in love with it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
To convey the sadness of blues singer Billie Holiday's last months, Loretta Devine, a star on the ascent, has to dig deep into her past for some painful memories. "I have to go to the weakest part of myself," said Devine, speaking in a soft, almost little-girl voice. "I have to go into the negative part of my thinking to get to her.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
The less seriously it takes itself, the more successful this 1995 film is. "Exhale" is based on Terry McMillan's hugely successful novel that examined the life and loves of four close female friends living in contemporary Phoenix and played by Whitney Houston, Loretta Devine, Lela Rochon and Angela Bassett (pictured). They're all "waiting to exhale," hoping to feel comfortable enough in a relationship to relax into the long haul (HBO Tuesday at 8 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998
L.A. Theatre Works' live performance radio theater series will offer seven plays during the fall-winter season.
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