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Loretta Livingston

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL
A program of brief pieces made in different years to dissimilar accompaniments seldom achieves the unity of a full-length composition. However, the four modern-dance works presented by Loretta Livingston and Dancers on Saturday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre complemented one another so perfectly, you'd guess they were conceived with an omnibus evening in mind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The 7th Street Metro station downtown typically features many kinds of human and mechanical motion -- but not normally dancing. On Sunday, however, award-winning locally based choreographer Loretta Livingston heightened the station's everyday sights and added a layer of social commentary by staging a three-hour event titled "Almost There" on Platform 2, close to the junction of the Red and Blue lines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | SALLI STEVENSON
"I know I can't save the world," says locally based choreographer-dancer Loretta Livingston. "But I can make through my dance a saving note and dedicate my life to the true guardianship of our planet." All through her career as a prominent member of the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company, Livingston remained involved with ecological issues. And now, at 39--after marriage to fellow Lewitzky dancer David Plettner and with a 4-year-old company of her own to run--she says she has found "a deeper ecological resolve."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The work of dancer-choreographer Loretta Livingston dominated the list of winners at the 13th annual Lester Horton Dance Awards, held Sunday at the Aratani/Japan America Theatre in downtown L.A. Presented in May at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, Livingston's "Leaving (Evidence)" -- a full-evening ensemble piece that dramatized and celebrated the impermanence of dance -- won awards in four major categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
In her years as a dancer with Bella Lewitzky and as a locally based dancer/choreographer ever since, Loretta Livingston always exemplified refinement. Meticulous in technique, subtle in expression and highly personal, her dancing and the pieces she made for herself or others have reflected a belief in craft, in mastery, in point-with-pride professionalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Three years ago, locally based dancer Loretta Livingston made what she sees as a daring move to end her 10-year tenure in the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company and become a choreographer. But she feels she came into her own only recently when she realized that all the choreographic vision in the world was meaningless without the right dancers to help realize it. "I felt a little in limbo when I hadn't found a voice apart from Bella's," she recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | LEWIS SEGAL, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer.
Last year proved a milestone one for local dancer/choreographer Loretta Livingston. For starters, she entered her first dance competition, the Dewars Young Artists Recognition Awards, winning the top prize ($3,000) for her solo "Balances." Then she reached 40--no longer a young artist to Dewars, but still the embodiment of willowy lyricism when she dances. She also enlarged her six-year-old modern-dance ensemble to six members and used video in the choreographic process for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
For the second year in a row, locally based modern dancer/choreographer Loretta Livingston won multiple honors at the annual Lester Horton Dance Awards, an event celebrating achievement throughout the Southern California area. Presented in a ceremony on Saturday evening at the Watercourt in California Plaza, the Horton Awards are named after the California dance pioneer who died in 1953, and are administered by the Dance Resource Center, a service organization in the arts community.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Jennifer Fisher, Jennifer Fisher is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Loretta Livingston may be one of the few people around who can look at the beleaguered sprawl of Los Angeles, study its turbulent past, embrace its seismic future and still describe her primary reaction as "tremendous joy." How does that work? It's almost a Pollyanna thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Loretta Livingston's career seems to happen in decades. A dancer-choreographer who first became widely known during her 10 years with the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company, she's now about to mark the 10th anniversary of her own troupe, Loretta Livingston & Dancers. But with milestones come mixed feelings. "It was not an anniversary that I had intended to observe," says Livingston, 44, seated in the West Los Angeles studio where she rehearses. "I like what I haven't done yet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2003 | Sasha Anawalt, Special to The Times
Made for the Los Angeles Public Library's Central Library, Loretta Livingston's new dance, "Read the Bones," is a quiet, thoughtful piece inspired by Jud Fine's fountain work outside the library's Flower Street entrance. So many people enter the downtown library from the parking lot, traveling by internal staircase or elevator practically right to the library's doorstep, that they miss the fountains and the Maguire Gardens. This is a huge mistake of public planning.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
You could argue that the best Southern California choreographers either leave for more supportive environments (Donald Byrd, for instance) or, like Loretta Livingston, devote themselves to short-term projects that don't require the incredible energy drain of sustaining a company and repertory. In contrast, Francisco Martinez has survived among us as a dance maker-company director for 23 years, and it's cost him.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
An hourlong meditation on the impermanence of dance and the isolation of the artist, "Leaving (Evidence)" may be the most forthright and searching self-examination ever launched by a member of the local dance community. Choreographed by Loretta Livingston under a City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Fellowship, it received its premiere on Saturday at the L.A. Theatre Center -- a premiere in which Livingston's seven-member ensemble managed to make unforgettable a work about leaving no trace.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Take four talented, creative dancers and musicians. Put them in a space at the Los Angeles Central Library with a small stage but wide aisles and balconies where performers could be situated. Set up improvisational structures or game plans for a six-part collaboration. Then work to see what the relationships between the participants, the venue and the chosen tasks, themes or subjects might yield.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not often one is treated to a spirited black comedy bursting with fresh, fluid dancing and an athletic, metaphysical spectacle on the same bill, but such was the case Friday night at Occidental College's Keck Theater. Two disparate but equally intriguing works--Michael Mizerany's premiere, "Bound," and "Triptych," by Stephanie Gilliland Dance Company--were each flawlessly performed and hyper-alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Like the winged hood ornament on a Rolls-Royce, award-winning dancer-choreographer Loretta Livingston makes a statement. In fact, with her skillful company of dancers, Livingston, a Bella Lewitsky disciple, made a series of them Friday at the Japan America Theatre in the premiere of her "Tales From the Plate, Moving North." Not necessarily profound or palpably moving statements, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
An hourlong meditation on the impermanence of dance and the isolation of the artist, "Leaving (Evidence)" may be the most forthright and searching self-examination ever launched by a member of the local dance community. Choreographed by Loretta Livingston under a City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Fellowship, it received its premiere on Saturday at the L.A. Theatre Center -- a premiere in which Livingston's seven-member ensemble managed to make unforgettable a work about leaving no trace.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not often one is treated to a spirited black comedy bursting with fresh, fluid dancing and an athletic, metaphysical spectacle on the same bill, but such was the case Friday night at Occidental College's Keck Theater. Two disparate but equally intriguing works--Michael Mizerany's premiere, "Bound," and "Triptych," by Stephanie Gilliland Dance Company--were each flawlessly performed and hyper-alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Jennifer Fisher, Jennifer Fisher is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Loretta Livingston may be one of the few people around who can look at the beleaguered sprawl of Los Angeles, study its turbulent past, embrace its seismic future and still describe her primary reaction as "tremendous joy." How does that work? It's almost a Pollyanna thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Loretta Livingston's career seems to happen in decades. A dancer-choreographer who first became widely known during her 10 years with the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company, she's now about to mark the 10th anniversary of her own troupe, Loretta Livingston & Dancers. But with milestones come mixed feelings. "It was not an anniversary that I had intended to observe," says Livingston, 44, seated in the West Los Angeles studio where she rehearses. "I like what I haven't done yet.
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