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Loris Ryan Broddrick

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Loris Ryan Broddrick, a San Joaquin Valley Democrat who rose from game warden to chief deputy director of the state Department of Fish and Game before leaving to work for Ducks Unlimited, was appointed Tuesday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to be director of Fish and Game. As director, Broddrick, 53, of Gold River, Calif., will oversee a department with more than 2,000 employees and a shrinking budget.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A decade after poisoning a scenic Sierra reservoir in a controversial and failed attempt to exterminate invading northern pike, California wildlife officials proposed Tuesday to again turn Lake Davis into a chemical stew in hopes of finally finishing off the saw-toothed predatory fish. While the last effort to treat the lake caused an uproar in nearby Portola and shut down what had been the tiny city's main source of water, this time the proposal is getting a far more friendly reception.
NEWS
February 10, 2004 | PETE THOMAS
Just reward Amid stories about slaughter of marine life, mostly involving indiscriminate nets and baited long-lines, comes praise for a local organization working to enhance marine life. The United Anglers of Southern California, with a membership of about 10,000, was presented with the Conservation Association of the Year Award during the recent International Game Fish Assn. banquet in Palm Beach, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
To the dismay of North Coast environmentalists and California lawmakers, a timber firm is attempting to alter key provisions of an agreement that was the cornerstone of a historic deal protecting the Headwaters Forest in Humboldt County. Pacific Lumber wants to revise the conservation plan in part so it can push logging closer to several of the rivers and tributaries that cut through its 217,000 acres.
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