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Lorraine Hunt Lieberson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2006 | Mary Rourke and Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writers
American mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, a riveting singer known for her fearsome vocal and dramatic power, whether in opera or the cantatas of Bach, died peacefully at her home in Santa Fe, N.M., on Monday, according to Richard Gaddes, general director of the Santa Fe Opera. She was 52. "It's a massive loss to the opera world," Gaddes said Tuesday. "She was one of the greatest singers of her generation. She was ... a deep, serious musician and had a great sense of theater."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Chris Pasles
OPERA-GOERS are used to topsy-turvy gender roles, with women most frequently singing "trouser" parts such as Cherubino in Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro" or Octavian in Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier." Even so, some people might be surprised by the Metropolitan Opera's announcement that countertenor David Daniels will replace mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson in a new production of Gluck's "Orfeo ed Euridice" slated for May. Hunt Lieberson died July 3.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
During the second intermission of "La Traviata" at the Metropolitan Opera the other night, conversation turned inevitably to Renee Fleming. She opened the Met season by singing Violetta, Verdi's beloved courtesan, and the vast majority of reviews were ecstatic. Fleming was compared to Maria Callas and in some circles deemed even more impressive. The Met has a huge hit on its hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Lorraine Hunt Lieberson died often, and exceedingly, devastatingly well. As an opera singer, she was expected to do no less. But Hunt Lieberson was no ordinary singer. And her deaths onstage were anything but ordinary. They were fantastically fearless. Her dying was not melodramatic, not sentimental, not even tearful, but shattering in a near shamanistic way. And she achieved this by being the most alive singer I have ever witnessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Is there a great singer who has ever so trusted her director? Is there, indeed, any soloist anywhere so brave as Lorraine Hunt Lieberson? Tuesday night, as part of its New Visions series, Lincoln Center presented the singular mezzo-soprano in the one of the oldest visions known to humanity--dying and how to do it. The program consisted of two Bach cantatas written for a solo singer and small instrumental ensemble. Peter Sellars directed. The presentation was unflinching.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Chris Pasles
OPERA-GOERS are used to topsy-turvy gender roles, with women most frequently singing "trouser" parts such as Cherubino in Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro" or Octavian in Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier." Even so, some people might be surprised by the Metropolitan Opera's announcement that countertenor David Daniels will replace mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson in a new production of Gluck's "Orfeo ed Euridice" slated for May. Hunt Lieberson died July 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Lorraine Hunt Lieberson died often, and exceedingly, devastatingly well. As an opera singer, she was expected to do no less. But Hunt Lieberson was no ordinary singer. And her deaths onstage were anything but ordinary. They were fantastically fearless. Her dying was not melodramatic, not sentimental, not even tearful, but shattering in a near shamanistic way. And she achieved this by being the most alive singer I have ever witnessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago in New York, the mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson sang two Bach cantatas about death and the transcendence of the soul in an unforgettably purposeful staging by Peter Sellars that seemed to come as close to capturing the mysteries of life and its leaving as a singer on stage could. Last week, Nonesuch released a CD of Hunt Lieberson performing those cantatas, Nos. 82 and 199, and it contains some of the most intense and moving Bach singing to be found on record.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lorraine Hunt Lieberson wasn't particularly successful in filling Royce Hall; the audience was small for her recital Wednesday night. But this mezzo-soprano also happened to fill Royce Hall more impressively than any vocalist I have ever heard in the UCLA auditorium. Even in an age of dazzling mezzos lurking around practically every corner, her combination of imposing dramatic intensity and overwhelming vocal presence astonishes. It is hard to fit Hunt Lieberson into categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Composer Peter Lieberson seems so good-natured, so serenely at peace with himself, it would not be surprising if this tanned meditation enthusiast with the sharp cheekbones and winning smile began to spontaneously levitate as he discusses his latest work. Lieberson, who lives in Santa Fe, N.M., is in town for this weekend's premiere of "Neruda Songs," his setting of five love sonnets by the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2006 | Mary Rourke and Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writers
American mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, a riveting singer known for her fearsome vocal and dramatic power, whether in opera or the cantatas of Bach, died peacefully at her home in Santa Fe, N.M., on Monday, according to Richard Gaddes, general director of the Santa Fe Opera. She was 52. "It's a massive loss to the opera world," Gaddes said Tuesday. "She was one of the greatest singers of her generation. She was ... a deep, serious musician and had a great sense of theater."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Composer Peter Lieberson seems so good-natured, so serenely at peace with himself, it would not be surprising if this tanned meditation enthusiast with the sharp cheekbones and winning smile began to spontaneously levitate as he discusses his latest work. Lieberson, who lives in Santa Fe, N.M., is in town for this weekend's premiere of "Neruda Songs," his setting of five love sonnets by the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
During the second intermission of "La Traviata" at the Metropolitan Opera the other night, conversation turned inevitably to Renee Fleming. She opened the Met season by singing Violetta, Verdi's beloved courtesan, and the vast majority of reviews were ecstatic. Fleming was compared to Maria Callas and in some circles deemed even more impressive. The Met has a huge hit on its hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago in New York, the mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson sang two Bach cantatas about death and the transcendence of the soul in an unforgettably purposeful staging by Peter Sellars that seemed to come as close to capturing the mysteries of life and its leaving as a singer on stage could. Last week, Nonesuch released a CD of Hunt Lieberson performing those cantatas, Nos. 82 and 199, and it contains some of the most intense and moving Bach singing to be found on record.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lorraine Hunt Lieberson wasn't particularly successful in filling Royce Hall; the audience was small for her recital Wednesday night. But this mezzo-soprano also happened to fill Royce Hall more impressively than any vocalist I have ever heard in the UCLA auditorium. Even in an age of dazzling mezzos lurking around practically every corner, her combination of imposing dramatic intensity and overwhelming vocal presence astonishes. It is hard to fit Hunt Lieberson into categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Is there a great singer who has ever so trusted her director? Is there, indeed, any soloist anywhere so brave as Lorraine Hunt Lieberson? Tuesday night, as part of its New Visions series, Lincoln Center presented the singular mezzo-soprano in the one of the oldest visions known to humanity--dying and how to do it. The program consisted of two Bach cantatas written for a solo singer and small instrumental ensemble. Peter Sellars directed. The presentation was unflinching.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
"Neruda Songs," a song cycle that Peter Lieberson composed on a commission from the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony, has won the $200,000 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition. The songs are based on five poems by Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. Lieberson wrote them for his wife, mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, who died of cancer in 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | From Times staff and wire reports
Last show: Connie Chung and Maury Povich will air their final edition of "Weekends with Maury & Connie" on MSNBC this morning at 7, with repeats at 1 p.m. today and 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Sunday. The news program, which premiered in January, was canceled because of low viewership. * Soprano cancels: Mezzo soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, who was scheduled to sing in Mahler's Third Symphony with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Walt Disney Concert Hall, Sept. 29-Oct.
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