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Lorraine Spurge

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BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A House committee is expected to subpoena and grant immunity to a key aide to Michael Milken, the head of Drexel Burnham Lambert's "junk bond" department in Beverly Hills. The aide is said to be Lorraine Spurge, a senior vice president in the department, who is in charge of records of customer requests to buy bonds.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 1992
Like many other financial writers, Alan Sloan doesn't know what he's talking about in "The Two Faces of Michael Milken" (March 15). Unfortunately, he constitutes but one voice in a Greek chorus of journalists that have waged an unprecedented campaign to bury Milken and the high-yield market. Sloan writes: " . . . what crashed it (the market) was the massive wave of defaults, which has crested but still continues." Naysayers like Sloan always deal with the exception rather than the rule.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 1992
Like many other financial writers, Alan Sloan doesn't know what he's talking about in "The Two Faces of Michael Milken" (March 15). Unfortunately, he constitutes but one voice in a Greek chorus of journalists that have waged an unprecedented campaign to bury Milken and the high-yield market. Sloan writes: " . . . what crashed it (the market) was the massive wave of defaults, which has crested but still continues." Naysayers like Sloan always deal with the exception rather than the rule.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A House committee is expected to subpoena and grant immunity to a key aide to Michael Milken, the head of Drexel Burnham Lambert's "junk bond" department in Beverly Hills. The aide is said to be Lorraine Spurge, a senior vice president in the department, who is in charge of records of customer requests to buy bonds.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former financier Michael Milken revealed Tuesday that he is undergoing treatment for prostate cancer, which was detected at an early stage during a routine physical examination. Milken, 46, said he is "optimistic that my treatment will be successful" and that he is "looking forward to as active and normal a life as possible."
BUSINESS
December 25, 1992 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former junk bond promoter Michael Milken will begin a two-month transition to freedom on Jan. 4 when he is scheduled to be moved to a halfway house in the Los Angeles area, a federal prison official confirmed Thursday. Milken has served nearly 22 months of a two-year prison sentence for securities fraud. (An initial 10-year sentence was later reduced.) He is scheduled for release March 2, when he begins the next phase of his sentence: 1,800 hours of community service over three years.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Savings & Loan late Wednesday sued former Drexel Burnham Lambert junk bond wizard Michael Milken and nine former associates, alleging that they manipulated and coerced Columbia into becoming the biggest buyer of risky junk bonds among the nation's savings and loans. The 176-page lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, effectively portrays Columbia as a puppet that Milken manipulated in almost a cult-like way.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1991 | HAL FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as a gala dedication of a book on American entrepreneurship. But the Thursday night celebration was also a defiant salute to those who created and benefited from some of the most controversial corporate financing methods of the go-go '80s. To start with, "Portraits of the American Dream" was dedicated to Michael Milken, the former Beverly Hills junk bond king who is serving a 10-year term for securities violations at the Federal Correctional Facility in Pleasanton, Calif.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kenny Moelis would never say so, but like others who once worked 14-hour days alongside Michael Milken, he must feel a sense of vindication. When the Drexel Burnham Lambert investment bank collapsed in disgrace seven years ago, Moelis and many other shellshocked young employees went job-hunting for the second time in their lives. The market for junk bonds became as dry as the Los Angeles River. Newspapers like this one ran headlines such as "Junk Bonds--the Financial Revolution that Failed."
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Milken, the onetime junk bond promoter who came to embody the Wall Street excesses of the 1980s, Monday checked into an aging halfway house in Hollywood to begin his transition to freedom and a life he says will be dedicated to extensive community service work. After serving 22 months for securities fraud and other violations, Milken was released from a minimum-security federal prison camp at Pleasanton, Calif.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1993 | JEFF KRAMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He may be the most hotly pursued ex-con in history. A month after disgraced junk bond king Michael Milken was freed from prison and reported to a dingy Hollywood halfway house, dozens of charities, nonprofit agencies and community groups are eagerly seeking the free services and financial acumen of a man who once made $550 million in a single year.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Information from newly cooperating witnesses has caused federal prosecutors to broaden substantially their probe of Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. and its "junk bond" chief, Michael Milken, even as the investment firm's talks on settling expected criminal charges appeared to be nearing an accord. Sources close to the investigation said the witnesses, both employees of Drexel's junk bond department in Beverly Hills, had given the U.S.
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