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Lorrie Moore

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February 20, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Lorrie Moore's "People Like That Are the Only People Here" may be the most ruthless short story I've ever read. Published in the New Yorker in 1997 and the next year in Moore's collection "Birds of America," it revolves around a family turned upside down after a mother finds a blot clot in her baby's diaper. The mother, like Moore, is a writer: "Take notes," her husband begs. "We are going to need the money. " But it is the direction these notes take us that gives the story its pitiless edge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Around the L.A. Times we are spending most of the week thinking about the book prizes Friday night and the Festival of Books on Saturday and Sunday, but those aren't the only interesting literary happenings. In fact, Wednesday and Thursday are packed with people and things you can't see at the festival -- here's a quick overview. WEDNESDAY: Lorrie Moore interviewed by Brighde Mullins about short story collection "Bark" at ALOUD at the L.A. Central Library, 7:15 p.m.; free; sold out but standby tickets may be available.
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BOOKS
September 14, 1986 | Laura Furman, Furman is the author of "Tuxedo Park" (Summit Books). and
An anagram, for those who've forgotten or never knew, is a word or phrase made by rearranging its letters, as now , won or dame , made . In the plural, as in the title of Lorrie Moore's first novel, the word means a game of making words by rearranging or adding letters. A baby, announces Benna Carpenter, heroine of the novel, is "not much more than a reconstituted ham and cheese sandwich. Just a little anagram of you and what you've been eating for nine months."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Lorrie Moore's "People Like That Are the Only People Here" may be the most ruthless short story I've ever read. Published in the New Yorker in 1997 and the next year in Moore's collection "Birds of America," it revolves around a family turned upside down after a mother finds a blot clot in her baby's diaper. The mother, like Moore, is a writer: "Take notes," her husband begs. "We are going to need the money. " But it is the direction these notes take us that gives the story its pitiless edge.
BOOKS
November 27, 1994 | Eric Larsen, Eric Larsen is author of the novels "An American Memory" and "I Am Zoe Handke."
Benoit-Marie Carr, remembering her 15th year and about to tell the story of it, announces what sounds like the considerable disadvantage that, "My childhood had no narrative." She comments that that time of her life "was all just a combination of air and no air," a "waiting for life to happen," having "no stories, no ideas, not really, not yet." It was, she says at last, "just a space with some people in it." And there you are.
BOOKS
June 3, 1990 | Merle Rubin, Rubin is a frequent contributor to Book Review
The appearance of her third book, "Like Life," confirms my impression of Lorrie Moore as a writer with a wry, skittish sense of humor and enough verbal glibness to provide material for all the stand-up comics in Los Angeles, but with very little ability to create convincing characters or tell stories that invite us to suspend our disbelief as we read them or to brood upon them after they've been read.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Around the L.A. Times we are spending most of the week thinking about the book prizes Friday night and the Festival of Books on Saturday and Sunday, but those aren't the only interesting literary happenings. In fact, Wednesday and Thursday are packed with people and things you can't see at the festival -- here's a quick overview. WEDNESDAY: Lorrie Moore interviewed by Brighde Mullins about short story collection "Bark" at ALOUD at the L.A. Central Library, 7:15 p.m.; free; sold out but standby tickets may be available.
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been a triumphant moment. On a crisp fall night, author Lorrie Moore was about to receive the 1998 O. Henry award for the nation's best short story. An overflow crowd at the National Arts Club turned out to hear her read it. But something was wrong. Seconds after Moore began, she seemed uncomfortable. She only made it through the first few pages of "People Like That Are the Only People Here"--the harrowing tale of a toddler with cancer--before halting and returning to a chair.
BOOKS
August 30, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
PASS THE POLENTA: And Other Writings From the Kitchen, With Recipes. By Teresa Lust (Steerforth Press: 270 pp., $24) Like Laurie Colwin and M.F.K. Fisher before her, and many a practical cook before them both, Teresa Lust goes gunning for haute cuisine. "I did not inherit a silver palate through good breeding," she writes in this hearty collection of essays on food and family, "and I could not create one through perseverance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On the surface, Brian Russell's first book of poems, “The Year of What Now” (Graywolf: 76 pp., $15 paper), seems nothing if not traditional; winner of this year's Bread Loaf Writers' Conference Bakeless Prize , it reads as a confessional, a sequence of reflections by a man whose wife is undergoing treatment for cancer. “what was I thinking,” Russell writes in “In the Event,” an early entry that sets the tone for the collection. “this is serious … / when you take / my hand I think   I don't care / what you say / I'm going to save you” But if part of Russell's purpose is to explore the dynamics of a relationship stretched by crisis, there is something else at work here also -- an exploration of genre and its (dis)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On the surface, Brian Russell's first book of poems, “The Year of What Now” (Graywolf: 76 pp., $15 paper), seems nothing if not traditional; winner of this year's Bread Loaf Writers' Conference Bakeless Prize , it reads as a confessional, a sequence of reflections by a man whose wife is undergoing treatment for cancer. “what was I thinking,” Russell writes in “In the Event,” an early entry that sets the tone for the collection. “this is serious … / when you take / my hand I think   I don't care / what you say / I'm going to save you” But if part of Russell's purpose is to explore the dynamics of a relationship stretched by crisis, there is something else at work here also -- an exploration of genre and its (dis)
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been a triumphant moment. On a crisp fall night, author Lorrie Moore was about to receive the 1998 O. Henry award for the nation's best short story. An overflow crowd at the National Arts Club turned out to hear her read it. But something was wrong. Seconds after Moore began, she seemed uncomfortable. She only made it through the first few pages of "People Like That Are the Only People Here"--the harrowing tale of a toddler with cancer--before halting and returning to a chair.
BOOKS
August 30, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
PASS THE POLENTA: And Other Writings From the Kitchen, With Recipes. By Teresa Lust (Steerforth Press: 270 pp., $24) Like Laurie Colwin and M.F.K. Fisher before her, and many a practical cook before them both, Teresa Lust goes gunning for haute cuisine. "I did not inherit a silver palate through good breeding," she writes in this hearty collection of essays on food and family, "and I could not create one through perseverance.
BOOKS
November 27, 1994 | Eric Larsen, Eric Larsen is author of the novels "An American Memory" and "I Am Zoe Handke."
Benoit-Marie Carr, remembering her 15th year and about to tell the story of it, announces what sounds like the considerable disadvantage that, "My childhood had no narrative." She comments that that time of her life "was all just a combination of air and no air," a "waiting for life to happen," having "no stories, no ideas, not really, not yet." It was, she says at last, "just a space with some people in it." And there you are.
BOOKS
June 3, 1990 | Merle Rubin, Rubin is a frequent contributor to Book Review
The appearance of her third book, "Like Life," confirms my impression of Lorrie Moore as a writer with a wry, skittish sense of humor and enough verbal glibness to provide material for all the stand-up comics in Los Angeles, but with very little ability to create convincing characters or tell stories that invite us to suspend our disbelief as we read them or to brood upon them after they've been read.
BOOKS
September 14, 1986 | Laura Furman, Furman is the author of "Tuxedo Park" (Summit Books). and
An anagram, for those who've forgotten or never knew, is a word or phrase made by rearranging its letters, as now , won or dame , made . In the plural, as in the title of Lorrie Moore's first novel, the word means a game of making words by rearranging or adding letters. A baby, announces Benna Carpenter, heroine of the novel, is "not much more than a reconstituted ham and cheese sandwich. Just a little anagram of you and what you've been eating for nine months."
BOOKS
March 12, 1995 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN
As book covers go, you can't get any more "plain wrap" than the one created for Lorrie Moore's "Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?" With such a title you might expect this novel to sport an illustration of a frog in bed with an IV unit attached to its foreleg, or a hospital building with little froggy faces peering out the window. But this slim, 148-page volume features nothing more on its cover than the words "Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?
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