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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
There was a sense of occasion at the Alex Theater in Glendale on Saturday night when Jeffrey Kahane led the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in works by Hannah Lash, Chopin and Haydn. The day before, Kahane announced he would be leaving his post after the 2016-17 season, making his run as music director an even 20 years, the longest in the ensemble's history. The farewells began after intermission when the orchestra's executive director, Rachel Fine, announced that at the end of his tenure he would be named the orchestra's first conductor laureate.
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MAGAZINE
April 2, 2006 | Debra J. Miller, Debra J. Miller teaches English at a private high school in Los Angeles.
On Thursday, Oct. 8, 1964, the day the police decided my mother killed my father, I woke up late, the kind of late that snaps you out of your favorite dream, the one where you're wrapped in the arms of your favorite TV hunk--mine was Dr. Kildare--and he's just about to . . . when bang your unconscious tells you the sun is out, the lights are on all over the house and you're going to be late for school because nobody got you out of bed. We were a family of five. I was 14 and the oldest.
OPINION
April 27, 2014
Re “Low on lodging, L.A. tourism lags,” Business, April 23, and “L.A.'s room service: City should be more selective with downtown tax breaks, some say,” April 19 On the one hand, you've got the article about hotel construction firms saying they can't build without multiyear tax breaks. Then there's the story about L.A. lacking sufficient lodging and tourism lagging. One development officer says his firm is “very bullish on Los Angeles.” If these companies are so bullish on L.A. , they should not be asking for handouts every time they want to construct a hotel in an area that is in desperate need of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
The process was routine. L.A. County Sheriff's homicide investigator Kevin Lloyd was flipping through snapshots of tattooed gang members. Then one caught his attention. Inked on the pudgy chest of a young Pico Rivera gangster who had been picked up and released on a minor offense was the scene of a 2004 liquor store slaying that had stumped Lloyd for more than four years. Each key detail was right there: the Christmas lights that lined the roof of the liquor store where 23-year-old John Juarez was gunned down, the direction his body fell, the bowed street lamp across the way and the street sign — all under the chilling banner of RIVERA KILLS, a reference to the gang Rivera-13.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas says he may call for restrictions on advertising for Lap-Band weight-loss surgery and could even propose a billboard campaign warning consumers about the risks of the procedure. Ridley-Thomas said Wednesday that he wanted to work with county public health officials to determine steps the county could take to "ensure serious health problems are not trivialized. " His comments came one day after the Food and Drug Administration accused the 1-800-GET-THIN marketing company and affiliated surgery centers of misleading ads about the safety of the weight-loss surgery.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
A teenage girl was found guilty Tuesday of helping two men kill popular young actor Merlin Santana, making a clean sweep for prosecutors, who earlier won convictions against her two codefendants. Monique King lied to her two accomplices by saying the actor had made sexual advances toward her; she also helped them get away after they shot Santana, said Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Larry P. Fidler.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer and
Very, very early, on a few special mornings, James Miscoll quietly climbs a restricted staircase from his 51st-floor office at the Bank of America Tower. There he stands, relishing his priceless, private view of Los Angeles. "It's no place for acrophobes," laughs Miscoll, who is the bank's top-ranking executive in Southern California. As the Los Angeles skyline reaches new heights, more and more companies eager for quarters that reflect their lofty status are willing to pay up to $50 a square foot--a third or more above the going rate for more earthbound office space.
NEWS
October 5, 2006 | Jessica Gelt, Special to The Times
THE girl on screen is petite, almost boyish, with cropped blond hair and black-framed glasses. "Mount Washington, a seemingly peaceful neighborhood smack-dab in the middle of fast-paced Highland Park," she says. "Full of Vietnam survivors, stray cats, speed addicts and sorcerers. The only home I've ever had," she concludes wistfully. The girl is 16-year-old Anabel Curry, and her short film, "Won't You Be My Neighbor?
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | Lisa Boone
More than 40 dealers from around the world, including Los Angeles-based Danish Modern Noho, Loft Thirteen and Reform Gallery, will convene at 3Lab Studios on Saturday and Sunday for the Los Angeles Modernism Show & Sale. As with year's past, the 27th annual event offers one-of-a-kind 20th century furnishings and accessories, including a Danish rosewood sideboard by Arne Vodder from exhibitor Midcentury LA, a mahogany table base by Gio Ponti from Roark Modern of New York and a huge Gambone Italy ceramic charger from Vangard 21 of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Snoop Dogg has a few choice words for Donald J. Sterling, embattled owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. Unfortunately, almost none of them are fit for publication in a family newspaper's blog. On the heels of an audio recording obtained by TMZ which the website says captures the Los Angeles business magnate upbraiding his girlfriend for “associating with black people” and “taking pictures with minorities” at Clippers games, the erstwhile Doggfather blasted Sterling with his own obscenity-packed videotaped rejoinder posted on Instagram on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
A recording that purports to show Clippers owner Donald Sterling making racist comments has generated swift condemnations. The Clippers have also responded, saying Sterling is not a racist. It's not the first time Sterling has been the subject of criticism over racial issues. Sterling is known for his various charity events that have benefited organizations that help the needy, including nonprofits serving the local Latino and African American communities. The Los Angeles chapter of the NAACP had been scheduled to give Sterling the group's Lifetime Achievement Award at its May 15 banquet at the Biltmore Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
His is a name that has appeared in this publication's pages hundreds of times - as an author and as a subject. It's a name that calls up notions of the Latino struggle for civil rights and the radical Chicano movement in Los Angeles. It's also a name that initially made filmmaker Phillip Rodriguez groan when someone suggested the life behind the name as a subject for his next documentary. The legacy of former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar has reached folklore heights since the journalist's suspicious death in 1970 at age 42. And therein lies Rodriguez's point of contention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival may have wrapped up last week, but still unfurling in Coachella's Pueblo Viejo District is an ambitious project that has brought together about a dozen muralists and international contemporary artists. "Coachella Walls," which has no formal connection to the Goldenvoice-produced festival, is billed as an "arts-driven community revitalization project. " Its organizers are Coachella-based Date Farmers Art Studios, a.k.a., the artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez, who grew up in the area and now show their work at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Sara Lessley
“Patriots” or “domestic terrorists”? “Citizen soldiers” or “disenfranchised militiamen”? “Honest businessman” or “freeloader?” It seems many are firmly on one side or the other when it comes to the standoff between 67-year-old cattleman Cliven Bundy (and his armed sympathizers) and the Bureau of Land Management over his cattle grazing on public land in Nevada. As Times staff writers John M. Glionna and Richard Simon wrote this week : “Bundy has his critics, but to supporters, his case is a symbol of everything wrong with America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996
We asked readers to tell us what they want in a new stadium or arena ("If We Build It, Will They Come?", Dec. 12) and they spoke loud and clear on one priority: better access. In particular, proximity to mass transit, or at least better control of traffic and easier parking. Others e-mailed new features they would like or suggested locations. One ex-Raider fan with a long memory simply tore out a map of the San Gabriel Valley, drew an X over Irwindale and scrawled: Build Stadium Here.
SPORTS
February 19, 1990 | From Wire Service Reports
Nadia Comaneci confirmed rumors that she tried to kill herself at age 15 by drinking bleach, according to Life magazine's March issue. Comaneci said she was hospitalized for two days and was "glad because I didn't have to go to the gym," according to the magazine. It had been rumored, and the 1984 film "Nadia" indicated, that Comaneci attempted suicide at the height of her fame in 1977 after scoring perfect 10s in the Montreal Olympics in 1976. She had denied the rumors, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Most film productions tend to spend a lot of time shooting a relatively narrow range of subject matter. "One Day on Earth" takes a slightly different approach. "Think globally, film locally" could be the motto for "Earth," a crowd-sourced film project originally founded to document a single 24-hour period with video snapshots from around the world. After holding three such events since 2010, the project's creators are now zooming in further with "Your Day. Your City. Your Future," a similar 24-hour collaboration that will take place across 11 American urban centers, including Los Angeles, and explore the issues and cultures poised to define cities over the next 20 years.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A former partner at the Los Angeles office of accounting giant KPMG was sentenced to 14 months in federal prison for giving confidential information about his firm's clients to a golfing buddy, who used it to make more than $1 million in profits by trading those companies' stocks. Scott London, 51, pleaded guilty to insider trading last year, admitting that he repeatedly tipped off a friend to the secrets of several KPMG clients, including Herbalife Ltd. and Skechers USA Inc., from 2010 to 2012.
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