Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Alliance For A New Economy
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Alliance For A New Economy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge has struck down a 2005 law passed by the Los Angeles City Council that barred large supermarkets from taking over a store and immediately firing all its workers, an industry group said Tuesday. The ruling was a victory for the California Grocers Assn., one of several business groups that have filed challenges against initiatives backed by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, a pro-labor nonprofit that pushed the supermarket ordinance. The alliance, which focuses heavily on bringing higher wages and greater benefits to low-income workers, has served as a driving force behind a variety of decision-making at City Hall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 3, 2011 | Jim Newton
Just a few months ago, leaders of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy were bracing for an attack. A Sacramento-based opposition research firm often hired by conservatives had blanketed Los Angeles public agencies with requests for information about LAANE, an influential nonprofit that works with labor, environmentalists, immigrant rights groups and others to shape local public policy. The inquiries were almost certainly aimed at unearthing some embarrassing tidbit that would, at best, make LAANE look bad or, at worst, cast some doubt on its tax-exempt status.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 3, 2011 | Jim Newton
Just a few months ago, leaders of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy were bracing for an attack. A Sacramento-based opposition research firm often hired by conservatives had blanketed Los Angeles public agencies with requests for information about LAANE, an influential nonprofit that works with labor, environmentalists, immigrant rights groups and others to shape local public policy. The inquiries were almost certainly aimed at unearthing some embarrassing tidbit that would, at best, make LAANE look bad or, at worst, cast some doubt on its tax-exempt status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A labor-backed advocacy group issued a study Wednesday that labeled much of Los Angeles' trash-disposal system polluting and wasteful, and called for the adoption of a franchise process that could bolster recycling rates, provide green jobs and increase city revenue. "What we have now is completely inefficient and chaotic, and we have to put some order to it," said City Councilman Jose Huizar. Private haulers operate on a permit basis that critics say falls short of recycling goals and lacks standards and accountability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A labor-backed advocacy group issued a study Wednesday that labeled much of Los Angeles' trash-disposal system polluting and wasteful, and called for the adoption of a franchise process that could bolster recycling rates, provide green jobs and increase city revenue. "What we have now is completely inefficient and chaotic, and we have to put some order to it," said City Councilman Jose Huizar. Private haulers operate on a permit basis that critics say falls short of recycling goals and lacks standards and accountability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Midway through his election-night victory speech, Eric Garcetti turned toward the cluster of family on the stage behind him and invited his wife to step forward. He thanked her for "making our life work" under the stress of his run for mayor of Los Angeles, saying, "None of this would be possible without Amy Wakeland. " It was a rare moment in the spotlight for Wakeland, a powerful player in Garcetti's political life but one who fiercely guards their family's privacy. With Garcetti's inauguration five weeks away, Wakeland, 43, will soon need to reconcile her fondness for a low profile with the platform that her husband's position will offer to advance causes that she has worked on for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2008 | David Zahniser
The California Supreme Court has refused to hear a challenge to the city's law imposing a higher minimum wage on 13 hotels near Los Angeles International Airport, handing a major victory to a coalition of labor unions and community groups. The decision, made public Wednesday, lets stand an ordinance passed by the City Council in 2006 that requires workers at 13 hotels to earn at least $10.64 per hour, or $9.39 if they receive health benefits. "The hotel industry in Los Angeles is booming, and workers deserve to also share some of that success," said Vivian Rothstein, deputy director of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, which advocates for issues favored by organized labor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999 | Larry B. Stammer
Eight grants totaling $260,000 have been awarded to Los Angeles-area educational, social, economic and environmental justice programs by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. The funds are part of $10 million granted to 306 projects throughout the nation by the campaign, which is marking its 29th anniversary. Father Robert J.
OPINION
September 10, 2000
While no one would deny the importance of education for a comfortable and meaningful life ("Labor's Winning Ticket," editorial, Sept. 4), it is naive to suggest that the income gap can be closed simply through education and training. The Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy recently released a study on the working poor in Los Angeles. The report shows that while the L.A. economy has produced vast rewards for some during the last decade, it has also created thousands of poverty-level jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2008 | David Zahniser
The Los Angeles Airport Hilton Hotel and Towers filed a lawsuit this week challenging a law that would require hotels near Los Angeles International Airport to pay their employees a higher wage -- $9.39 per hour or $10.64 per hour without benefits. With the city's "living wage" law slated to take effect Saturday, attorneys for the LAX Hilton argued that the measure violates federal labor laws and cannot be imposed on companies that do not directly work for the city of Los Angeles. "Hilton does not have any applicable contracts with the city that would enable the city to . . . set wages higher than California's minimum wage," the lawsuit states.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge has struck down a 2005 law passed by the Los Angeles City Council that barred large supermarkets from taking over a store and immediately firing all its workers, an industry group said Tuesday. The ruling was a victory for the California Grocers Assn., one of several business groups that have filed challenges against initiatives backed by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, a pro-labor nonprofit that pushed the supermarket ordinance. The alliance, which focuses heavily on bringing higher wages and greater benefits to low-income workers, has served as a driving force behind a variety of decision-making at City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By David Zahniser
Foes of a planned Wal-Mart grocery store in Chinatown filed a lawsuit Thursday against the city of Los Angeles seeking to bar the chain market from opening. The Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance L.A., working with the Southeast Asian Community Alliance, said the city's Community Redevelopment Agency board failed to review the Chinatown project before building permits were awarded for the planned supermarket. The nonprofit groups contend that a redevelopment vote was required and are seeking to have the building permits rescinded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
A judge has issued a tentative ruling calling for the Los Angeles City Council to reconsider its decision allowing a San Fernando Valley hospital to expand, handing a victory to the union activists and neighborhood groups that had criticized the project. Superior Court Judge Thomas McKnew said the 15-member council used the wrong voting process when it approved a $180-million expansion at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, a facility that treated 17 injured passengers in the Sept.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|