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NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Earlier this month, a state judge ordered the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles to include the names of church leaders who mishandled sex-abuse claims when it finally releases scores of confidential priest files as part of a 2007 settlement. Yet despite that court order, the archdiocese has continued to act as if the rules don't apply to it. This week, the church resubmitted a proposal that would have redacted the names of top church leaders from the documents and only provided the names of those officials in a generic cover sheet attached to the priest's file.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
During the Roman Catholic Church's decades-long sex abuse crisis, then-Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahony went to great lengths to keep law enforcement uninvolved. Instead of handing priests accused of abuse over to police, he would send them to therapists he knew could keep a secret or to faraway rehab programs. Under his watch, the church discouraged abuse victims from talking to authorities. That's according to The Times' two-part series Sunday and Monday on the 23,000 pages of documents ordered released by the courts that detail Mahony's efforts to keep accusations of abuse in the Los Angeles Archdiocese from erupting into a public scandal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
The Vatican's choice of a Mexican-born archbishop, Jose Gomez of San Antonio, as the next prelate of Los Angeles reflects the formal acknowledgment of a remarkable, decades-long shift in the center of gravity of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church -- from Northeast to Southwest, from Eurocentric to Latino-dominated. The 58-year-old Gomez has the potential to reshape the Archdiocese of Los Angeles over most of the next two decades, assuming he can successfully steer it past the shoals of a lingering sexual abuse crisis.
WORLD
March 8, 2013 | By Henry Chu
ROME -- Days away from entering the Sistine Chapel to help pick a new pope, Cardinal Roger Mahony on Friday called on Christians to embrace forgiveness and lamented the enmity and isolation that he said were at the root of such problems as gangs, hate crimes and war. At a Mass in a medieval basilica assigned to him as cardinal, Mahony also asked for divine guidance for him and his fellow prelates as they prepared to begin the conclave that will...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Dwindling enrollment and other challenges have decimated urban Catholic schools nationwide, but a high-profile initiative to raise $100 million in tuition assistance may allow thousands of children to continue attending schools in the Los Angeles Archdiocese and save those schools from extinction. The initiative, headed by former Los Angeles mayor Richard Riordan, will ask supporters to make provisions in their trusts or wills for the archdiocese's Catholic Education Foundation, which already awards thousands of grants annually to needy students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992
A Vatican statement urging U.S. Catholic leaders to fight legislation that would outlaw discrimination against gays and lesbians will not change the more tolerant policies of the archdiocese of Los Angeles, a spokesman said Friday. "The Vatican announcement will have no effect on any policies or practices of the Los Angeles archdiocese," Bill Rivera said. "It is intended as a guidance for certain kinds of legislative initiatives, none of which have any effect locally."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995
The Rev. Msgr. John J. Hurley, the senior priest in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, died Jan. 7 at Nazareth House for the aged. He was 91. A native of Ireland, he was ordained in 1928 and spent his entire 67 years of ministry in the Los Angeles Archdiocese. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called him the "patriarch of the archdiocese." He was pastor emeritus of Our Lady of the Valley in Canoga Park, where he served pastor from 1943 to 1976.
OPINION
January 23, 2013
For years, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles fought to keep secret its confidential files concerning pedophile priests. Hundreds of sex abuse victims hoping for a full accounting of what church leaders knew about the growing scandal and what they did to stop it were rebuffed time and again. But the cover-up is finally coming to an end. On Monday, a series of memos and letters filed in a civil case confirmed that Cardinal Roger M. Mahony and other church leaders plotted to shield pedophile priests rather than turn them over to police and prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
The Vatican has begun the search for a successor to Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles, who is expected to step down early next year as head of the nation's largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. The archdiocese distributed a memo to priests and lay leaders this week confirming that the search is underway and asking parishes to join in a prayer enlisting God's help in finding "a shepherd who will be an example of goodness to your people and who will fill our hearts and minds with the truth of the Gospel."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A "relatively unflappable" Cardinal Roger Mahony answered questions under oath for more than 3 1/2 hours Saturday about his handling of clergy sex abuse cases, according to the lawyer who questioned the former archbishop. "He remained calm and seemingly collected at all times," said attorney Anthony De Marco, who represents a man suing the Los Angeles Archdiocese over abuse he alleges he suffered at the hands of a priest who visited his parish in 1987. Mahony has been deposed many times in the past, but Saturday's session was the first time he had been asked about recently released internal church records that show he shielded abusers from law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A "relatively unflappable" Cardinal Roger Mahony answered questions under oath for more than 3 1/2 hours Saturday about his handling of clergy sex abuse cases, according to the lawyer who questioned the former archbishop. "He remained calm and seemingly collected at all times," said attorney Anthony De Marco, who represents a man suing the Los Angeles Archdiocese over abuse he alleges he suffered at the hands of a priest who visited his parish in 1987. Mahony has been deposed many times in the past, but Saturday's session was the first time he had been asked about recently released internal church records that show he shielded abusers from law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe and Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
In more than two decades leading the Los Angeles Archdiocese, Cardinal Roger Mahony headlined immigration rallies, marched for worker rights and made national news by announcing he would defy a congressional bill he regarded as anti-immigrant. But the man who replaced him in 2011 - Archbishop Jose Gomez - has shied away from such attention-getting actions. Instead, he plans to take 60 conservative Catholic business leaders on a spiritual pilgrimage to the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City this fall in hopes of winning them over on immigration reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two weeks ago, Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez announced he had removed Cardinal Roger Mahony from all public duties amid revelations that he plotted to conceal child molestation by priests from law enforcement. But Mahony on Monday found himself back at the center of church business, as one of 117 cardinals who will elect a successor to Pope Benedict XVI. Mahony was quick to weigh in on the papal news - posting a statement on his online blog at 8:38 a.m., two hours before the archdiocese announced that Gomez would issue his own remarks at the midday Mass at the downtown Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | Sandy Banks
In middle school, my daughter had a friend who'd spent most of her life in foster care. During the next few years, the girl would pass through almost a dozen foster families, group homes and probation camps. She had a habit of running away when she felt mistreated or ignored. She'd call us, and I'd drive over to pick her up from some street corner or bus stop. I'd bring her home, mother her for a few days, then talk her into returning to the system that she hated. "You'll be fine," I remember promising her one night, as we pulled up in front of the North Hills residential center that would be her new home.
OPINION
February 6, 2013
Re "Trying to make sense of it all," Feb. 4 The article quotes Msgr. Robert J. Gallagher as telling his parishioners at St. Charles Borromeo Church in North Hollywood on Sunday that "young people whose lives were ruined … need a sense that they are being invited back into God's grace. " This strikes me as an astonishingly cruel and insensitive statement - thoughtless, really. Are the targets of the Roman Catholic Church's predators to understand that they've been separated from God by being victims of crimes and that they are now, somehow, eligible to embark on a journey of redemption?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Ashley Powers and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In the midst of renewed public outrage over its handling of clergy sex abuse, the Los Angeles Archdiocese is considering a $200-million fundraising campaign that could erase debts brought on by the scandal. The archdiocese has hired a New York company, Guidance In Giving Inc., to study the feasibility of a large-scale fundraiser that would shore up a bottom line hit hard by costly abuse litigation. It would be the archdiocese's first capital campaign in 60 years. The archdiocese's $660-million settlement in 2007 with more than 500 victims was the largest in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2011 | Steve Lopez
Cardinal Roger Mahony is down to his last week on the job, but my invitation to the going-away party must have been lost in the mail. Before His Eminence passes the torch, I put in one last request for an interview, to no avail. That keeps my record intact, but it's a shame because I had several questions about the latest scandal at the archdiocese. This one involves a priest who admitted he was a molester but remained in ministry. The good reverend was even appointed, if you can believe this, to Mahony's sexual abuse advisory board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A federal judge rejected a plea Thursday by the Los Angeles Archdiocese to join a constitutional challenge to the state law allowing hundreds of people to sue the Roman Catholic Church for decades-old child molestation. Lawyers for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Davenport, Iowa, have asked the judge to void the 2003 statute because they contend that it violates the church's 1st Amendment right to the free exercise of religion, due process and other constitutional rights. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2013 | Hector Becerra and Ashley Powers and Victoria Kim
When he took office in 1985, Roger M. Mahony set about modernizing the operations of the Los Angeles Archdiocese. He brought in computers and put women in top jobs. He then appointed an Irish-born academic to a brand-new cabinet position: Vicar for Clergy, a human resources director of sorts for priests, brothers and nuns. Msgr. Thomas J. Curry would shape the way the nation's largest archdiocese responded to claims that its priests had molested and raped children. In his five years in the role, Curry was a staunch defender of the church and its clergymen.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Earlier this month, a state judge ordered the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles to include the names of church leaders who mishandled sex-abuse claims when it finally releases scores of confidential priest files as part of a 2007 settlement. Yet despite that court order, the archdiocese has continued to act as if the rules don't apply to it. This week, the church resubmitted a proposal that would have redacted the names of top church leaders from the documents and only provided the names of those officials in a generic cover sheet attached to the priest's file.
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