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October 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts has rejected a $40,000 grant to support an exhibit at a Boston museum by an artist whose work includes sexual themes, a museum official said today. The Institute of Contemporary Art received formal notification last week that NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer had rejected the grant, which had been recommended for approval by a review committee, said Arthur Cohen, the institute's marketing director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Tom Christie
AMSTERDAM - You could almost hear Mike Kelley laughing. As journalists entered the Stedelijk Museum's new so-called bathtub building to hear director Ann Goldstein introduce a retrospective of Kelley's work, they were greeted by the mellifluous tones of the late Andy Williams from invisible speakers: " It's the most wonderful time of the year, with the kids jingle belling and everyone telling you 'Be of good cheer.' It's the most wonderful time of...
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Tom Christie
AMSTERDAM - You could almost hear Mike Kelley laughing. As journalists entered the Stedelijk Museum's new so-called bathtub building to hear director Ann Goldstein introduce a retrospective of Kelley's work, they were greeted by the mellifluous tones of the late Andy Williams from invisible speakers: " It's the most wonderful time of the year, with the kids jingle belling and everyone telling you 'Be of good cheer.' It's the most wonderful time of...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Mark Dutcher's work is nothing if not lived in. Made with humble materials and straightforward techniques, his paintings and sculptures are messy, fervent and unpretentious. They're covered in fingerprints and other blemishes; any mistakes that he's made are left pointedly intact. They're works that never let you forget they were made by another human being, which is just as Dutcher intends it. "Even if I had lots of money and could fabricate something perfectly," he says, "I don't think I would be obsessed with perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1991 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Date Change: Stevie Wonder's two concerts to benefit a cancer-stricken Los Angeles artist who needs a bone marrow transplant will be Friday instead of Saturday, as originally announced. The date was changed because of a schedule conflict. Wonder will perform at 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. at the Crossroads Theater in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 5, 1988
Fidel Danieli; Los Angeles Artist, Critic Fidel Danieli, 49, a well-known local artist and art critic whose articles appeared in Artform magazine, the Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art Journal, Art Week and other publications. He also was a lecturer on art and taught at Valley College. In North Hollywood on March 26 of occlusive coronary arteries, a coroner's autopsy disclosed Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
New Twitchell Mural: Los Angeles artist Kent Twitchell on Monday dedicated his new mural, "Logos," at La Mirada's Biola University. Twitchell has been working on the 30-foot depiction of Christ since 1989. He said painting the piece took him twice as long as he expected because he was "a little intimidated by the subject matter." "It's by far my most involved piece," the artist said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1996
In today's art reviews, Cathy Curtis is at it again using meaningless words in her critique ("All Dressed Up With Someplace to Go," Nov. 12). I quote: "Los Angeles artist Elizabeth Pulsinelli's discovery of a lot of women's and girls' dress patterns at a garage sale was the unlikely basis of a richly textured, satisfyingly unstructured conceptual art piece." How ridiculous! Since when is it called art a bunch of clothes hanging? Come, Cathy, do you do this with tongue in cheek? Or are you for real?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Los Angeles artist Kent Twitchell and more than a dozen volunteers on Saturday began repainting Twitchell's Hollywood mural of renowned character actor Strother Martin. The mural, originally painted on a building at the corner of Fountain Avenue and Kingsley Drive in 1971, was covered over with gray paint in January under the direction of the building's owner. The owner has now signed a contract protecting the restored mural under the guidelines of the California art preservation law.
NEWS
November 26, 1995
The Bible passage that inspired the 1960s folk song written by Pete Seeger also inspired Los Angeles artist John August Swanson, left, to create his own version of the Ecclesiastes. It was a work that, in turn, moved Joan Chittister to put her thoughts to paper in "There Is a Season" (Orbis Books), which features the prints, at right, of the self-trained artist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Garages buckled, highways collapsed. Swift but violent, the 1994 Northridge earthquake damaged buildings for miles around. But Los Angeles artist Stephen Glassman noticed one type of structure held strong: Billboards. The memory stayed with Glassman over the years. Then he had a thought. Why not entirely re-imagine those everyday pillars of steel? "Urban Air," his latest project, aims to transform billboards into suspended bamboo gardens and create "an open space" in the city skyline.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
This post has been updated. See details below. With another massive shutdown of the 405 freeway approaching, a grass-roots effort is underway to offer Angelenos an artistic reprieve that's locally focused, timed for the second coming of Carmageddon, Sept. 29 and 30. More than 100 artists, arts organizations, advocacy groups and community partners have teamed to launch what they are calling Artmageddon, with the  tagline "Less Car. More Art. "  Artmageddon will feature a series of events spread out across 16 neighborhoods in Los Angeles County, encouraging patrons to bypass the freeways.
IMAGE
November 7, 2010 | By Steffie Nelson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For women, one of the fastest ways to get to know a new friend is to look through her closet. Sifting through the layers of silk, sequins, cotton and wool, one can learn about the new acquaintance's past, her obsessions, her quirks and the things shared in common. Los Angeles artist, photographer and fashion lover Jeana Sohn is inviting everyone to this intimate party, via a weekly feature on her blog. Though women posting photos of themselves and their outfits online has become ubiquitous in this Internet age, Closet Visit ups the ante, presenting elegant, at-home portraits of some of L.A.'s most creative, stylish women, such as handbag designer Clare Vivier and jeweler Kathryn Bentley, shot with their wardrobes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Eight Californians, including a public high school physics teacher, a deaf sign-language expert, a jellyfish researcher and an installation artist, are among 23 winners of this year's grants from the MacArthur Foundation. The recipients will each receive $500,000 over the next five years, with no strings attached. Included on this year's list are a few celebrated names, such as David Simon, the Baltimore-based screenwriter of "The Wire," the 2002-08 television series about the urban drug trade, and Annette Gordon-Reed, the Harvard law professor who has written about Thomas Jefferson's relationship with a slave.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Sharon Mizota, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The freeway appears regularly in L.A. art — works by Ed Ruscha, Dennis Hopper and Catherine Opie come to mind — but rarely does art grace the Southland's concrete corridors. There is graffiti, of course, and a smattering of decaying murals, but for the most part, the freeway is an artistic wasteland. Until now. Coming to select rush hour traffic jams this summer: "Superclogger," a mobile puppet theater by Los Angeles artist Joel Kyack. Accompanied by fellow artist Michael Hayden, Kyack performs shows out of the back of his nondescript white pickup truck for anyone who happens to be driving behind it. Commissioned by the Culver City non-profit LAXART, "Superclogger" began its crawl through the Southland's most congested stretches of freeway on June 1, on the 405. (Kyack monitors the flow of traffic on Google Maps to find the slowest spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dawn Kasper's first solo show out of graduate school, at Circus Gallery in 2007, was titled simply "Life and Death," which gives you some idea of the scope of her inquiry. Working in video, installation and performance primarily, she's made works exploring "Evil," "Love" and "Truth." She's currently working on a group called the "On" series — as in, "On Forgetting," "On Religion" "On Existence" — and another she's dubbed "Clues to the Meaning of Life." She is an artist preoccupied, in other words, by the Big Questions, either unwilling or unable to home in on a more reasonable set of parameters.
NEWS
March 5, 1995
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority and Cal State L.A. unveiled a mural at the campus' Metrolink station last week. The huge mural, titled "The Muralists," depicts artists at work, a campus scene and a montage of other images.. The work was created as part of the MTA's Art for Rail Transit program. Los Angeles artist Terry Schoonhoven, a muralist for 22 years, has worked with Cal State L.A. students over two years to produce the mural. Schoonhoven has also created artwork for the
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner
The year 1968 was a transformative one in American history, marred by the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, bringing new dimension to the long-running civil rights struggle. "After 1968," a traveling exhibit on view at the California African American Museum in Exposition Park, challenged emerging artists born in or after that fateful year to create projects based on their interpretation of the civil rights period and its influence on future generations. The exhibit, originated by Atlanta's High Museum of Art, was conceived as a companion to "Road to Freedom," a collection of 160 civil rights photographs from 1956 to 1968 on display at the Skirball Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Was Roger Kuntz the last American Scene painter? That's the unexpected thought that arises from seeing a large retrospective exhibition of work by the Los Angeles artist, who died in 1975 at the age of only 49. American Scene painting emerged from an anxiety-ridden period of national self-examination between the Great Depression and World War II. It pretty much petered out as the booming 1950s unfolded. But that's just when Kuntz was getting started. The Laguna Art Museum has assembled 63 paintings, 21 works on paper and 12 small bronze sculptures from all phases of Kuntz's 25-year career.
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