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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles school district officials are expected next week to name a high-profile East Coast arts education leader to head the flagship arts high school in downtown Los Angeles, a move that substantially involved billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad, sources close to the decision told The Times. The switch at the top is the latest in a series of controversies around the 2-year-old, $232-million showcase Grand Avenue campus. Kim Bruno, currently head of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in New York City, the setting for the movie "Fame," is expected to be the new principal; a contract has not yet been signed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Shortly after assuming the helm as the fourth director of the Museum of Contemporary Art last month, Philippe Vergne visited the Los Angeles Times to meet with editors and writers. Still in the beginning stage of absorbing MOCA's history and formulating his mission, he didn't have a great deal to share about his plans. But when asked whether he thought performance, a currently disregarded part of the museum's founding mission, was important, Vergne answered that he wouldn't call it important.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The matter of anniversaries divisible by five has arisen again, compounded this time by the curious charm of a century divided into quarters. It was 25 years ago this very day that I took up my chores at the Los Angeles Times. As usual on such an occasion the air is full of ghosts and memories, all tinted with astonishment that it has been so long.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By David Ng
Leslie Sacks, the Los Angeles art dealer who ran gallery spaces at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica and in Brentwood, has died. The South African-born gallerist died Sept. 26 at the age of 61 after a battle with cancer, according to a gallery release sent this week.  The gallery said Sacks' widow, Gina, will take a more active role in the management of the business and the two spaces will continue to operate normally in adherence to Sacks' wishes. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Sacks first established himself in the L.A. gallery scene in 1991 when he opened Leslie Sacks Fine Art in Brentwood.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Los Angeles Arts of Asia & Oceania Show (Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St., Santa Monica, [310] 455-2886). A Boiken fiber mask, left, from New Guinea is among the rare and ancient artifacts on exhibit, but the show also includes contemporary works, and all are from more than 65 galleries specializing in Asian art. www.caskeylees.com. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. $12.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1988 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
The British are coming! From Feb. 4 to April 30--beginning with a major David Hockney retrospective at the County Museum of Art and ending after the final West Coast premiere performance of the full Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields Orchestra--Los Angeles will be experiencing a major new, and probably one-time-only arts festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1988
Personal History Born Valsin A. Marmillion on April 16, 1950 in Cleveland, Miss. When he was 4, family moved to Houma, La., about 45 miles from New Orleans in Cajun country. The middle of five children, his father was a high school teacher and football coach and his mother a housewife, both descendants of French immigrants. Early interest in politics. Attended Catholic schools for 7 years; graduated from public high school, where he was student body president.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer.
Steven D. Lavine, president of CalArts, once went to the opera in San Francisco wearing shorts and a bathrobe. It was not a fashion statement; he was trying to make a point. "People looked at me with such disdain--some people whispered: 'How could you ruin this for us?' " said Lavine, 45. "I was trying to make the statement that they're smothering the music that I love in something that is unattractive. "The stuffiness that surrounds the arts--what is it about? We have sort of smothered these institutions in a social style that is representative of a certain generation.
OPINION
April 11, 1993
Keeping Los Angeles interesting might seem the very least of our problems. This city, with all its problems, is a compendium of the future. Here, where the Third World collides with the First, where Asia meets Europe and Africa in America, where indigenes and immigrants (in several senses of both words) struggle for a common language, no one need lack for mental challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For William Wilson, the former Los Angeles Times art critic who died Saturday at the age of 78, art was a childhood refuge, a teenage survival mechanism, and, finally, a career that saw him chronicle the city's rise in art-world stature from his first byline in 1965 to his retirement in 1998. "He grew up under really rotten circumstances, and was just a self-made person," said Diane Leslie, a novelist who was a close friend. Another longtime friend, artist Don Lagerberg, said Wilson died in his sleep at a Los Angeles care facility from Alzheimer's disease, which had been diagnosed about four years ago. Wilson, born July 5, 1934,  never knew his father and often talked of hard times growing up in Los Angeles with a single mother who was given to radical mood swings and who fell to her death in an apparent suicide when he was 18. Among his boyhood memories, Leslie said, was eating a great deal of canned tuna - and noticing that sometimes the can had a picture of cats on it. He often spoke of how his mother took him to the library, where he would pore over picture books.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When John Baldessari was looking for an L.A. gallery to show his work 20 years ago, he narrowed his choice to three and ultimately chose Margo Leavin. "I thought she would be around for a long time," he said. "And it turned out to be true. " For more than four decades, Leavin has occupied a prominent perch in the Los Angeles contemporary art scene. Her gallery, which opened in 1970, is one of the most enduring and recognizable in the city, with a roster of top-tier artists that includes Jeffrey Vallance, Alexis Smith and William Leavitt as well as Baldessari.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The next principal of the high-profile downtown Los Angeles arts high school is the head of a well-established performing arts school in Washington, D.C., officials confirmed Wednesday. The selection of veteran arts educator Rory Pullens is the latest chapter for the Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, which has been plagued by leadership turnover and other controversies. In Pullens, the Grand Avenue school will have a respected leader who is credited with building and maintaining the caliber of program that district officials here are seeking.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By D.J. Waldie, For the Los Angeles Times
In September 1945, under a pall of ocher smog and summer heat, Los Angeles entered the postwar world. The city then was bigger, wealthier and more diverse than ever. Its established people — mostly past middle age and conservative, a few who were really rich — still had the narrowness of the Midwest towns from which many of them had come in the 1920s. The city's new people — Okies and Arkies, black Southerners, and white ethnics — had arrived with the war. Few of them had much interest in art. Of course, there was art in Los Angeles they could have seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rebels in Paradise The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s Hunter Drohojowska-Philp Henry Holt: 288 pp., $27 After decades of neglect, Los Angeles art history is a hot topic. The most immediate reason is "Pacific Standard Time: L.A. Art 1945-1980," an enormous collaborative venture spearheaded by the Getty Foundation and Getty Research Institute. Dozens of exhibitions and related publications exploring the city's rise as an art capital will appear this fall and winter in cultural institutions from San Diego to Santa Barbara.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Debra Engle went to a celebration of the city school district's arts program with a dark cloud hanging over her head. Like almost 7,000 other school district employees, Engle had received a preliminary layoff notice earlier this year and could lose her job by midsummer. For the last several years, the Los Angeles Unified School District has faced large budget shortfalls and the school board has approved cutting positions and programs to try to balance the budget. The nation's second-largest school system is facing an estimated $408-million shortfall, and many unions have agreed to their members' taking four unpaid days off. But, depending on the state's budget, district officials could still approve cutting jobs over the summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The Los Angeles Theatre Center, the most ambitious new theater project in the city, has completed its opening roster of plays and directors. Sept. 19, the English language translation of Chekhov's "The Three Sisters" opens at Theatre One. Michael Frayne ("Noises Off") is translator. Stein Winge, the artistic director of the experimental wing of the National Theatre of Norway, directs. Sept. 26, Sam Shepard's "Fool For Love" has its Los Angeles premiere at Theatre Two.
NEWS
January 2, 2003
MOVIES Hoffman takes the next step Though stout of stature and ruddy of feature, Philip Seymour Hoffman is perhaps the coolest actor working today, appearing regularly as a standout supporting performer in films by such directors as Paul Thomas Anderson, Todd Solondz, Anthony Minghella, Cameron Crowe and Spike Lee. This week he steps into a leading role in the indie drama "Love Liza," playing a Web site designer dealing with the death of his young wife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles school district officials are expected next week to name a high-profile East Coast arts education leader to head the flagship arts high school in downtown Los Angeles, a move that substantially involved billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad, sources close to the decision told The Times. The switch at the top is the latest in a series of controversies around the 2-year-old, $232-million showcase Grand Avenue campus. Kim Bruno, currently head of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in New York City, the setting for the movie "Fame," is expected to be the new principal; a contract has not yet been signed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2010 | Deborah Vankin, Times Staff Writer
The already heavily attended monthly Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk just got a little bit bigger ? by one person, to be exact. Today the 6-year-old nonprofit organization that puts on the event announced the appointment of the first full-time, salaried executive director: Joe Moller. Moller, 36 and a Southern California native, works as an event producer and lives in the historic core of downtown L.A. His company, Joe Moller Events, has a client list that's as varied as Dr. Dre and OfficeMax, and he's produced events for the Hollywood Film Festival, Outfest, the Hammer Museum and the Santa Monica Place mall, among others.
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