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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
In an unusually strong show of local art world activism, a standing-room-only crowd of artists packed a theater in Hollywood Monday night to voice concerns over how the new $20-million Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts is spent. Clapping and cheering, about 350 artists and arts administrators--sitting in the aisles and leaning against the walls--gathered at Barnsdall Park's Gallery Theatre for the first "town meeting" of the Los Angeles Arts Congress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, Times Staff Writer
Some of Los Angeles' struggling artists and fledgling arts groups may now get a small cut of the city's new multimillion-dollar arts endowment. Under the new guidelines adopted by the City Council this week, up to $800,000 from the Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts may become available to individuals and less established arts organizations that, for the most part, have not be able to raise substantial amounts of money on their own.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
The first funds from the new Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts are being awarded under old guidelines of the city's cultural affairs department, scotching an anticipated city council vote on new guidelines that some local arts activists had spent months gearing up for. "Unfortunately, the (new) guidelines aren't done yet, so we've got to do the next best thing, to use existing processes," Al Nodal, general manager of the cultural affairs department, said in a phone interview. The endowment, which could generate $20 million annually, will not be fully operational before July, 1990, and much of its budget--about $15 million expected from fees on municipal and private development--probably won't be available until fall at the earliest, city officials say. But $5.8 million from the city's general fund is already available, and cultural affairs department officials at one time had planned to deliver an interim spending plan for it to the Los Angeles City Council by July.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
The first funds from the new Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts are being awarded under old guidelines of the city's cultural affairs department, scotching an anticipated city council vote on new guidelines that some local arts activists had spent months gearing up for. "Unfortunately, the (new) guidelines aren't done yet, so we've got to do the next best thing, to use existing processes," Al Nodal, general manager of the cultural affairs department, said in a phone interview. The endowment, which could generate $20 million annually, will not be fully operational before July, 1990, and much of its budget--about $15 million expected from fees on municipal and private development--probably won't be available until fall at the earliest, city officials say. But $5.8 million from the city's general fund is already available, and cultural affairs department officials at one time had planned to deliver an interim spending plan for it to the Los Angeles City Council by July.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, Times Staff Writer
Some of Los Angeles' struggling artists and fledgling arts groups may now get a small cut of the city's new multimillion-dollar arts endowment. Under the new guidelines adopted by the City Council this week, up to $800,000 from the Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts may become available to individuals and less established arts organizations that, for the most part, have not be able to raise substantial amounts of money on their own.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
In another unusually strong show of local art world activism that's fast becoming the norm, a throng of black artists and arts administrators turned out Thursday night to voice concerns over spending plans for the new $20-million Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts. The vociferous, standing-room-only crowd of nearly 600, composed mostly of emerging independent artists and officials from small, struggling organizations, gathered at an auditorium near USC.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
"It's really a trip through the movie," says painter Stephen Verona of his 100-foot mural commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the epic "Gone With the Wind." "(By viewing the mural) you can walk into this movie and feel all those famous moments that we've grown up watching in clips all of our lives." Verona has spent a year making his acrylic-on-masonite mural, which is on view this week (Tuesday through Saturday) at the Andrea Ross Gallery, 2110 Broadway, Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
Eager to share in a $25-million windfall of city funds for the arts, a number of artists and arts groups across Los Angeles are gathering forces to make sure they have a say in how the cash gets spent. The bundle of money is the Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts, a new $20-million program approved last November that increases municipal arts support from $4.9 million to about $25 million. None of the funds will be handed out before July, when a new city budget becomes law.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council and Mayor Tom Bradley have approved nearly $1 million in arts grants through the Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts, with more than one-third of the money going for the first time to individual artists. The council and Bradley approved a total of $989,660 in cultural grants, including $369,900 for 72 individual artists and another $52,500 for 20 fledgling arts groups--both of which have previously been ineligible for city funds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
In an unusually strong show of local art world activism, a standing-room-only crowd of artists packed a theater in Hollywood Monday night to voice concerns over how the new $20-million Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts is spent. Clapping and cheering, about 350 artists and arts administrators--sitting in the aisles and leaning against the walls--gathered at Barnsdall Park's Gallery Theatre for the first "town meeting" of the Los Angeles Arts Congress.
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