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Los Angeles Arts Recovery Fund

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NEWS
May 9, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
Sixteen artists, organizations and programs that help youths were awarded a total of $80,000 in the second round of the Los Angeles Arts Recovery Fund, a grant program started after last year's riots. The grants of $4,558 to $5,000 were presented to such groups and agencies as McKinley Avenue School in South-Central, for its mural and art workshops, and such individuals as Sally Colmaire, for a mural development project in South-Central.
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NEWS
January 24, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Like many youngsters, David Brown grew up reading comic books and eagerly followed the exploits of super-heroes such as Batman, Spider-Man and Superman. But Brown, a 38-year-old graphic artist, always dreamed of creating a black super-hero, a character that would spark the imagination of African-American youths. "I've always been into comic books," Brown said. "And I felt that there was a need to create a black super-hero that black children could relate to."
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A dark-red cellophane sky serves as the background for a black construction-paper skyline and smoky sky that Lincoln High School students created to illustrate their reflections of last spring's riots. Poems based on what they saw in those terror-filled days, what they remembered from their childhoods and what they dream for the city--as well as the illustrations to dramatize their works--are on display through April 17 at the Lincoln Heights Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francisco Chavez sees the Los Angeles riots as a struggle between the haves and have-nots. In his vision, a mass of unclothed poor men reach through a sheet of fire toward a party of affluent Angelenos who drink and cavort under a gaudy city skyline. Between them stands a phalanx of threatening police. It is a vision that remained inside Chavez's head until he was given brush and easel by a charitable workshop that encourages the homeless to express their raw emotions through art.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"What makes it really crazy," said Joe Diaz, "is that there are eight gangs in a 2 1/2-block area." Diaz is talking about the Pico-Aliso Housing Projects in Boyle Heights, a couple miles east of Downtown, where he has lived all of his 21 years. Although he admits that the area has its problems--gang shootings are not unusual--he still believes the neighborhood is unfairly portrayed by the media as just another crime-ridden barrio. "People here are together, not separate," he said.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To express his views on the oppression of women, Hector Barcenas used bold, dramatic hues to paint a club-wielding woman stomping down a red path toward the stoic figures of a man and his dog. Colored cubes, symbolizing the frustration of her "blocked ideas," frame the oil painting. Vincent Richards used more obvious images to express his views about another societal problem--poverty. Richards took a photograph of Sunday food lines in front of Los Angeles City Hall.
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