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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997
Although Hale-Bopp is still visible, it is fading fast and for all practical purposes comet season is over in Southern California. More than 80,000 persons saw Hale-Bopp through a telescope at Griffith Observatory. Before the new volunteer spirit was unveiled nationally, members of the Los Angeles Astronomical Society and of the Los Angeles Sidewalk Astronomers made a telescope forest out of the observatory front lawn. Thanks to them and the support of Friends of the Observatory, more people saw Hale-Bopp at Griffith Observatory than anywhere else on the planet.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Sputnik, the Garvey Ranch Observatory in Monterey Park is a relic from the dawn of the Space Age. The 7 1/2-inch telescope, never an optical marvel even in the Kennedy years, casts a weak eye toward planets and galaxies dimmed by city lights. The 24-foot-wide dome, built of sheet metal on a wooden frame, was once powered by a small electric motor, but it broke down so long ago that no one can remember when.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1999
We all love John Dobson, founder of the Sidewalk Astronomers, and have great respect for the work done by the Los Angeles Astronomical Society at Griffith Observatory ("Good Heavens," by Brenda Rees, Feb. 18). But I do feel it necessary to add a bit more. There are many other clubs in the Southern California area where the public can go, free of charge, to enjoy the universe of amateur astronomy. A list of these clubs can be found at the Griffith Observatory Web site, http://www.griffithObs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1999
We all love John Dobson, founder of the Sidewalk Astronomers, and have great respect for the work done by the Los Angeles Astronomical Society at Griffith Observatory ("Good Heavens," by Brenda Rees, Feb. 18). But I do feel it necessary to add a bit more. There are many other clubs in the Southern California area where the public can go, free of charge, to enjoy the universe of amateur astronomy. A list of these clubs can be found at the Griffith Observatory Web site, http://www.griffithObs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vance Tyree had left the city behind. Now, with his two telescopes planted on a remote hillside under a brilliant night sky, he seemed light-years away. "That blew up perhaps 50,000 years ago," he said as he sighted a wispy arc of gas--the vestiges of an exploded star--toward the core of the galaxy. The amateur astronomer--one of several dozen camped together on a cold night--was photographing the deep sky with four cameras mounted on his five-inch refractor telescope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1994 | NONA YATES
Every full moon and new moon evening when the tides are highest, through mid-July, the grunion will come ashore for their annual mating ritual. On many nights that the small fish are expected to arrive, the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium will conduct Meet the Grunion programs to educate visitors about these elusive creatures. On Sunday, and on March 30, the aquarium will open at 8 p.m. for participants to view a film about the grunion, followed by a walk to the beach with aquarium staff at 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Sputnik, the Garvey Ranch Observatory in Monterey Park is a relic from the dawn of the Space Age. The 7 1/2-inch telescope, never an optical marvel even in the Kennedy years, casts a weak eye toward planets and galaxies dimmed by city lights. The 24-foot-wide dome, built of sheet metal on a wooden frame, was once powered by a small electric motor, but it broke down so long ago that no one can remember when.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
Last month, arctic winds brought much more to Los Angeles than morning frost and snow on Interstate 5. The gusty winds brought hundreds of Southern Californians to respond to a simple need: winter clothing for homeless teen-agers. On behalf of those kids, we want to thank all those who helped. I was personally overwhelmed and moved by the generosity of the Los Angeles community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2000
The thin crescent moon, Saturn, Jupiter and Mars are grouped closely together in the evening sky. This is the best and most compact grouping of solar system objects this year and should not be missed. Face west shortly after 8 p.m. Saturn is a short distance to the right of the crescent moon. Bright Jupiter is farther to the lower right of the moon, and fainter Mars is to the upper right of Jupiter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997
Although Hale-Bopp is still visible, it is fading fast and for all practical purposes comet season is over in Southern California. More than 80,000 persons saw Hale-Bopp through a telescope at Griffith Observatory. Before the new volunteer spirit was unveiled nationally, members of the Los Angeles Astronomical Society and of the Los Angeles Sidewalk Astronomers made a telescope forest out of the observatory front lawn. Thanks to them and the support of Friends of the Observatory, more people saw Hale-Bopp at Griffith Observatory than anywhere else on the planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1994 | NONA YATES
Every full moon and new moon evening when the tides are highest, through mid-July, the grunion will come ashore for their annual mating ritual. On many nights that the small fish are expected to arrive, the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium will conduct Meet the Grunion programs to educate visitors about these elusive creatures. On Sunday, and on March 30, the aquarium will open at 8 p.m. for participants to view a film about the grunion, followed by a walk to the beach with aquarium staff at 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vance Tyree had left the city behind. Now, with his two telescopes planted on a remote hillside under a brilliant night sky, he seemed light-years away. "That blew up perhaps 50,000 years ago," he said as he sighted a wispy arc of gas--the vestiges of an exploded star--toward the core of the galaxy. The amateur astronomer--one of several dozen camped together on a cold night--was photographing the deep sky with four cameras mounted on his five-inch refractor telescope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
Last month, arctic winds brought much more to Los Angeles than morning frost and snow on Interstate 5. The gusty winds brought hundreds of Southern Californians to respond to a simple need: winter clothing for homeless teen-agers. On behalf of those kids, we want to thank all those who helped. I was personally overwhelmed and moved by the generosity of the Los Angeles community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Those who slept through the rare "blood moon" Monday night missed more than just the rare red hue, as a packed Griffith Observatory erupted into whistles, cheers and howls during the much-anticipated lunar eclipse. The crowds descended upon the observatory early, with hundreds of people lounging on the lawn hours before the eclipse was set to begin at about 11 p.m. The observatory and the Los Angeles Astronomical Society, as well as other astronomy clubs and organizations, offered telescopes for viewers. As forecasters had predicted, clear skies made for for prime viewing conditions across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995 | NONA YATES
The 24th annual Festival of Whales at Dana Point will begin Saturday, marking the height of gray whale-watching season. The festival offers a variety of activities for families that teach about the great mammals that migrate off the Southern California coast. The Orange County Marine Institute will host an open house of its facilities and marine wildlife cruises aboard the new RV Sea Explorer.
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