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NEWS
June 16, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
HOUSE SPARROW (Passer domesticus) Description: Male in breeding plumage has gray crown, chestnut nape, black bib and black bill. Female has streaked back, buffy eye stripe and unstreaked breast. Habitat: Cultivated lands, woodland and edge, around human habitation. Diet: Seeds, insects and fruit. Displays: Courting male hops around female, back flattened, head up, tail down, wings extended with tips nearly touching the ground. Nest: In artificial or natural cavity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2010 | By Amina Khan
In an effort to coax a small shorebird off the federal threatened species list, a historical roosting ground at Dockweiler State Beach in Playa del Rey has been fenced off to protect the birds from people and vehicles, authorities said. The Western snowy plover has been steadily losing its nesting grounds to beachgoers over the last several decades, said Jane Hendron, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Carlsbad. "Historically, we had Western snowy plovers nesting from Southern California up to Oregon, but as you can imagine, we have developed many hundreds and hundreds of miles of beaches," Hendron said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2010 | By Amina Khan
In an effort to coax a small shorebird off the federal threatened species list, a historical roosting ground at Dockweiler State Beach in Playa del Rey has been fenced off to protect the birds from people and vehicles, authorities said. The Western snowy plover has been steadily losing its nesting grounds to beachgoers over the last several decades, said Jane Hendron, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Carlsbad. "Historically, we had Western snowy plovers nesting from Southern California up to Oregon, but as you can imagine, we have developed many hundreds and hundreds of miles of beaches," Hendron said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they have every holiday season since 1900, the men and women of the Audubon Society take to the woods loaded for bird. Pencil? Check. Clipboard? Check. Binoculars? Calculator? Sibley's Guide to Birds? Check, check, check--all standard equipment in Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count, a beak-by-beak tally that draws on the skills of about 50,000 volunteers throughout the United States, with a smattering in Canada, Latin America and the Pacific Islands.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich, Dallas Jamison and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times. Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
GREAT BLUE HERON (Ardea herodias) Description: Large, gray-blue heron. Black stripe extends above eye; white foreneck is streaked with black. Breeding adult has yellowish bill and ornate plumes on head, neck and back. Habitat: Freshwater and brackish marshes, swamps, lakes, rivers. Diet: Mostly fish, but sometimes also feeds on human food scraps, nestlings, small mammals. Displays: Pairs will rest their crests and clap bills. Nest: Builds a platform nest in a tree or on a cliff.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
Description: Male's head and throat are deep rose red. Female's throat usually shows red flecks, often forming a patch of color. Underparts are grayish in both sexes, mixed with varying amounts of green. Back is an irridescent green in both sexes. Habitat: Open woodland, chaparral, gardens. Diet: Primarily nectar, also spiders and tree sap. Displays: Male flight traces arc of vertical circle before female; rising very high, plummets downward making chirp sound at lowest point, then rises straight above female, hovers and faces her at top of ascent, delivering brief squeaky song.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
(Psaltriparus minimus) Description: Tiny, acrobatic, long-tailed bird that usually feeds in large, active, twittering flocks. Gray-brown above, paler below, brownish cap. Habitat: Woodlands, scrub, chapparal. Diet: Insects (including spiders), seeds, fruit. Displays: Courtship of calls, trills, posturing. Nest: Distinctive gourd-shaped hanging pocket, woven around and supported by twigs. Made of moss, lichen, leaves, cocoons, grass and flowers, secured by spider web and lined with plant down, hair and feathers.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Description: Male's brown head contrasts with metallic green-black body. Female is gray-brown above, paler below. Habit of feeding with tail cocked up distinguishes species in mixed blackbird flocks. Habitat: Open woodlands, farmlands, suburbs. Diet: Insects, spiders and seeds. Displays: On ground, courting male ruffles feathers of upper body, bows toward female and calls. Nest: The brown-headed cowbird does not build a nest of its own; it is a nest parasite, laying eggs in nests of other species, including flycatchers, warblers, finches and vireos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial penalty imposed on a Van Nuys firm for illegal waste-water discharges led Tuesday to a mini-windfall for two conservation groups, which received $165,000 at ceremonies held in Pacific Palisades and at the Sepulveda Basin wildlife reserve in Encino. With the wildlife area as a backdrop, City Atty. James K. Hahn presented a check for $82,500 to officers of the Los Angeles Audubon Society, which will use the money to develop a master plan to enhance the bird sanctuary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they have every holiday season since 1900, the men and women of the Audubon Society take to the woods loaded for bird. Pencil? Check. Clipboard? Check. Binoculars? Calculator? Sibley's Guide to Birds? Check, check, check--all standard equipment in Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count, a beak-by-beak tally that draws on the skills of about 50,000 volunteers throughout the United States, with a smattering in Canada, Latin America and the Pacific Islands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial penalty imposed on a Van Nuys firm for illegal waste-water discharges led Tuesday to a mini-windfall for two conservation groups, which received $165,000 at ceremonies held in Pacific Palisades and at the Sepulveda Basin wildlife reserve in Encino. With the wildlife area as a backdrop, City Atty. James K. Hahn presented a check for $82,500 to officers of the Los Angeles Audubon Society, which will use the money to develop a master plan to enhance the bird sanctuary.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
HOUSE SPARROW (Passer domesticus) Description: Male in breeding plumage has gray crown, chestnut nape, black bib and black bill. Female has streaked back, buffy eye stripe and unstreaked breast. Habitat: Cultivated lands, woodland and edge, around human habitation. Diet: Seeds, insects and fruit. Displays: Courting male hops around female, back flattened, head up, tail down, wings extended with tips nearly touching the ground. Nest: In artificial or natural cavity.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
(Psaltriparus minimus) Description: Tiny, acrobatic, long-tailed bird that usually feeds in large, active, twittering flocks. Gray-brown above, paler below, brownish cap. Habitat: Woodlands, scrub, chapparal. Diet: Insects (including spiders), seeds, fruit. Displays: Courtship of calls, trills, posturing. Nest: Distinctive gourd-shaped hanging pocket, woven around and supported by twigs. Made of moss, lichen, leaves, cocoons, grass and flowers, secured by spider web and lined with plant down, hair and feathers.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Description: Male's brown head contrasts with metallic green-black body. Female is gray-brown above, paler below. Habit of feeding with tail cocked up distinguishes species in mixed blackbird flocks. Habitat: Open woodlands, farmlands, suburbs. Diet: Insects, spiders and seeds. Displays: On ground, courting male ruffles feathers of upper body, bows toward female and calls. Nest: The brown-headed cowbird does not build a nest of its own; it is a nest parasite, laying eggs in nests of other species, including flycatchers, warblers, finches and vireos.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
Description: Male's head and throat are deep rose red. Female's throat usually shows red flecks, often forming a patch of color. Underparts are grayish in both sexes, mixed with varying amounts of green. Back is an irridescent green in both sexes. Habitat: Open woodland, chaparral, gardens. Diet: Primarily nectar, also spiders and tree sap. Displays: Male flight traces arc of vertical circle before female; rising very high, plummets downward making chirp sound at lowest point, then rises straight above female, hovers and faces her at top of ascent, delivering brief squeaky song.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich, Dallas Jamison and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times. Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
GREAT BLUE HERON (Ardea herodias) Description: Large, gray-blue heron. Black stripe extends above eye; white foreneck is streaked with black. Breeding adult has yellowish bill and ornate plumes on head, neck and back. Habitat: Freshwater and brackish marshes, swamps, lakes, rivers. Diet: Mostly fish, but sometimes also feeds on human food scraps, nestlings, small mammals. Displays: Pairs will rest their crests and clap bills. Nest: Builds a platform nest in a tree or on a cliff.
NEWS
April 20, 1991
Environmentalists have been much involved in the exciting proposal to create a state park out of 600 acres of an unspoiled wild area north of the San Fernando Valley. The California Department of Parks and Recreation has made a feasibility study of this possible Santa Clarita Woodlands Park and is most enthusiastic about acquiring the property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991
The Los Angeles Audubon Society would like to clarify the facts surrounding our letter printed in the April 20 edition of The Times. The proposed Santa Clarita Woodlands Park is 6,000 acres of unspoiled wilderness, not 600. We sent a letter on March 17 to the four leading candidates for the race in the 12th Council District asking where they stood on the park. When our letter to The Times was mailed on April 2, the only written response we had was from Julie Korenstein supporting the park.
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