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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
The period-instrument Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra ended its season this weekend in characteristic fashion--three lithe, pointed performances of strong, unhackneyed repertory. The program was devoted to Italian cantatas by Handel, sung by sopranos Mary Rawcliffe and Virginia Sublett. As heard Friday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, the pairing of voices and music proved well-nigh ideal. "Aminta e Fillide," a lengthy pastoral lovers' dialogue, capped the evening.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
Imagine vivid theater pieces mixing music and crisp spoken dialogue from major playwrights. The band is driven by fiercely strummed guitars, and the musical influences come from all over--a mix of Latin American, some classical, a little North African, a little Afro-Caribbean. Sounds postmodern, right? And if somebody like Shakespeare wrote the librettos and Baroque composers set them in this fashion, we'd surely know all about it in our own age of musical eclecticism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
For less obvious reasons, early-music performance in San Diego County is about as popular as ice fishing. Though a modest circle of aficionados presents occasional chamber concerts, opportunities to hear large works by composers who flourished before the time of J. S. Bach are rare. Seen in this light, conductor David Bates' mounting of a concert version of Henry Purcell's opera "Dido and Aeneas" at La Jolla United Methodist Church on Sunday night was both a brave and a commendable venture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Seldom performed, Handel's pastoral opera, "Il Pastor Fido" (The Faithful Shepherd), focuses on the amorous goings-on of various mythical country folk. And, as Howard Posner's informative program notes for the modest production given Friday night at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica pointed out, such a work was "meant to charm, not overpower, the audience." While this concert performance by the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra of Handel's initial 1712 version did in many ways charm, it was difficult for the listener to transport himself to the fields of Arcadia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
Gregory Maldonado is an American. Big deal, there are about 225 million of those. But in the circumscribed world of period musical performance, the violinist-director of the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra is among very few occupying leadership positions in a field dominated even in this country by Britons. "They do charm people here with that accent," the bearded, 31-year-old Merced native says. Maldonado's background is in as striking a contrast to that of his colleagues as is Fresno State, his alma mater, to Oxford.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
Imagine vivid theater pieces mixing music and crisp spoken dialogue from major playwrights. The band is driven by fiercely strummed guitars, and the musical influences come from all over--a mix of Latin American, some classical, a little North African, a little Afro-Caribbean. Sounds postmodern, right? And if somebody like Shakespeare wrote the librettos and Baroque composers set them in this fashion, we'd surely know all about it in our own age of musical eclecticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | LARRY HARNISCH
" Zeitgeist " has become a hip buzzword, as in the phrase "the eclectic synergy of the Zeitgeist ." (Yes, there are people who really talk that way.) But the strict definition of Zeitgeist , literally, "the spirit of the times," is an important concept when it comes to the arts: Music, dance, theater--none exists in a vacuum but is a part of daily life. Next month, the J. Paul Getty Museum will present "Music and the French Revolution" in an effort to place music of the era in its political and historic context, showing the effect of political upheaval in the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1996
Members of the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra, including Blaise Bryski on pianoforte and Gregory Maldonado on violin, will perform tonight at "A Little Night Auction," a celebration of the 240th birthday of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The 7:30 p.m. event, which takes place at Santa Monica's historic W.I. Simonson Inc. Mercedes-Benz showroom, includes a silent auction and dessert buffet, followed by a 9 p.m. concert performance. Tickets are $40 and $60, and benefit the L.A. Baroque Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
The period-instrument Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra ended its season this weekend in characteristic fashion--three lithe, pointed performances of strong, unhackneyed repertory. The program was devoted to Italian cantatas by Handel, sung by sopranos Mary Rawcliffe and Virginia Sublett. As heard Friday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, the pairing of voices and music proved well-nigh ideal. "Aminta e Fillide," a lengthy pastoral lovers' dialogue, capped the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Seldom performed, Handel's pastoral opera, "Il Pastor Fido" (The Faithful Shepherd), focuses on the amorous goings-on of various mythical country folk. And, as Howard Posner's informative program notes for the modest production given Friday night at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica pointed out, such a work was "meant to charm, not overpower, the audience." While this concert performance by the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra of Handel's initial 1712 version did in many ways charm, it was difficult for the listener to transport himself to the fields of Arcadia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
Gregory Maldonado is an American. Big deal, there are about 225 million of those. But in the circumscribed world of period musical performance, the violinist-director of the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra is among very few occupying leadership positions in a field dominated even in this country by Britons. "They do charm people here with that accent," the bearded, 31-year-old Merced native says. Maldonado's background is in as striking a contrast to that of his colleagues as is Fresno State, his alma mater, to Oxford.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | LARRY HARNISCH
" Zeitgeist " has become a hip buzzword, as in the phrase "the eclectic synergy of the Zeitgeist ." (Yes, there are people who really talk that way.) But the strict definition of Zeitgeist , literally, "the spirit of the times," is an important concept when it comes to the arts: Music, dance, theater--none exists in a vacuum but is a part of daily life. Next month, the J. Paul Getty Museum will present "Music and the French Revolution" in an effort to place music of the era in its political and historic context, showing the effect of political upheaval in the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
For less obvious reasons, early-music performance in San Diego County is about as popular as ice fishing. Though a modest circle of aficionados presents occasional chamber concerts, opportunities to hear large works by composers who flourished before the time of J. S. Bach are rare. Seen in this light, conductor David Bates' mounting of a concert version of Henry Purcell's opera "Dido and Aeneas" at La Jolla United Methodist Church on Sunday night was both a brave and a commendable venture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS
One has to wonder where our area's musical heads and ears are if the spiffy little Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra, our one artistically viable period band, can fill only half of Santa Monica's inviting, accessible--it is located a block from the Third Street Promenade--300-seat (eyeball estimate) First Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON
This is strictly for lovers of Il Prete Rosso, the Red Priest. It's an all-Vivaldi program by the Los Angeles Baroque Orchestra. Antonio Vivaldi, the 18th-Century master of the concerto and concerto grosso, was a priest who happened to have reddish hair, and he turned out captivating music by the yard. There were 230 concertos for violin, 40 for bassoon and 25 for cello, to say nothing of oratorios and chorales. There were even 50 operas, of which 16 survive.
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