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Los Angeles Black Media Coalition

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would a movie by any other name draw as much attention? Probably not, say the black activists who have protested what they see as the offensive title of the French-Canadian film "How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired." At least two major black readership newspapers have banned ads for the movie from their pages, while some of the nation's general circulation newspapers have agreed only to publish ads with an abbreviated title: "How to Make Love. . . !!!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would a movie by any other name draw as much attention? Probably not, say the black activists who have protested what they see as the offensive title of the French-Canadian film "How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired." At least two major black readership newspapers have banned ads for the movie from their pages, while some of the nation's general circulation newspapers have agreed only to publish ads with an abbreviated title: "How to Make Love. . . !!!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Minority technicians in film, television and radio will be honored at the fourth annual Outstanding Technical Awards Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. at the Hollywood Roosevelt. The ceremony, featuring actor Louis Gossett Jr. as keynote speaker, is organized by the Los Angeles Black Media Coalition.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992
While I do experience a great deal of anxiety concerning past and current programming, I think it should also be noted that I am very pleased to see African-Americans working and look forward to continued progress both in front of and behind the camera. I realize the struggle inherent in simply bringing a project to air, and I am extremely proud of those who have persevered. As stated in the article, some situation comedies featuring mostly white cast members suffer the same ailments as the programs being examined.
NEWS
January 28, 1988
Hugh A. Robertson, who was one of the first black film editors in the industry and overcame the prejudice of his time to receive an Academy Award nomination for his work on "Midnight Cowboy," is dead. He was 55 when he died Jan. 10 at the Veterans Administration Hospital in West Los Angeles, it was learned this week. Robertson parlayed his editing skills into fulfilling a lifelong dream of directing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992
The Media Image Coalition of Minorities and Women commends Jon Krampner on his well-researched, comprehensive article on the lack of minority male anchors on prime-time newscasts ("Anchored Out of the Mainstream," Dec. 15). The MIC, formed under the auspices of the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, promotes balanced imagery and increased diversity on television and film. In March, the MIC wrote the news directors of KABC, KNBC and KCBS to urge the inclusion of an African-American anchor in their weekday lineups, as there are none , male or female, on these channels locally.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of media watchdog and minority groups has sent a letter to CBS advertisers asking them not to buy commercial time for the pilot of the "Driving Miss Daisy" television series that the network is airing Friday. The letter, dated Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1986 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer and Times intern William Chitwood contributed to this article
Ratings-troubled KCBS-TV Channel 2 announced plans Monday for a radically new 4-7 p.m. news lineup that station officials called the "next generation of local news" with "no similar model anywhere in the country." Beginning Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Guillaume, like many actors and actresses, is not a big fan of watching himself on television. But Guillaume says he has no problem watching his performance as Hoke Colburn, the patient and helpful chauffeur, in the series pilot of "Driving Miss Daisy," a television comedy version of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play and the Academy Award-winning film airing Friday on CBS at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer
Bobby Soul was more than just another hyperkinetic, jive-talkin' disc jockey to Veronica Washington. He was the great "black" hope who could save her struggling African-American radio station. Washington, the fictional owner of the fictional WBLZ in Detroit that is the setting for the new NBC situation comedy "Rhythm & Blues," believed Soul, who had a huge following of black listeners at another station, was the key to boosting WBLZ's floundering ratings.
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