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Los Angeles Bureau Of Contract Administration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members may have thought they were making a groundbreaking social statement last year when they passed a "living wage" law, making city contractors pay their workers $8.50 an hour in wages and benefits. But a report commissioned by the City Council and an interview with the laws' leading proponent suggest that they have also wound up making a statement about the difficulty of forcing change: It's one thing to pass a law; quite another to get it enforced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members may have thought they were making a groundbreaking social statement last year when they passed a "living wage" law, making city contractors pay their workers $8.50 an hour in wages and benefits. But a report commissioned by the City Council and an interview with the laws' leading proponent suggest that they have also wound up making a statement about the difficulty of forcing change: It's one thing to pass a law; quite another to get it enforced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing to change the way Ventura County awards contracts, two county leaders are asking the Board of Supervisors today to develop criteria for rating construction contractors--and punishing those who do not live up to the standards. The request by Supervisors John Flynn and Susan Lacey comes as environmentalists hammer county officials for continuing to do business with Somis-based contractor Tom A. Staben, despite his lengthy rap sheet of illegal dumping and code violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ruling by Los Angeles' Bureau of Contract Administration sharply contradicts Mayor Richard Riordan's office on a controversial and hotly disputed wage rule that could apply to thousands of workers at Los Angeles International and Ontario airports. At issue is whether the city's so-called living wage ordinance, passed by the council last year over Riordan's veto, applies to the airlines with leases at the two facilities.
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