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Los Angeles Cacophony Society

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NEWS
February 7, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a sunny weekend afternoon, the members of the Los Angeles Cacophony Society sit in semi-darkness beneath the old pinatas at a Highland Park bar called Mr. T's. This is their first meeting of 2002, their first gathering in at least four months. They are here to pick up the pieces. Cacophonists are part of a loose network of underground societies, with "lodges" in about a dozen U.S. cities. For the last decade, the L.A. group has been one of the most active in the country.
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NEWS
February 7, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a sunny weekend afternoon, the members of the Los Angeles Cacophony Society sit in semi-darkness beneath the old pinatas at a Highland Park bar called Mr. T's. This is their first meeting of 2002, their first gathering in at least four months. They are here to pick up the pieces. Cacophonists are part of a loose network of underground societies, with "lodges" in about a dozen U.S. cities. For the last decade, the L.A. group has been one of the most active in the country.
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MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | Mark Ehrman, Edited by Mary McNamara
Lodged between a tarot reader and a quick-sketch artist on Venice Beach one Sunday were some odd fellows with a sign that said: "Free Casts--Arms or Legs." "Feigning injury is in," they insisted, urging passers-by to plaster up and concoct heroic stories about their bad breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Victoria Kim and Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writers
Along Vine Street near the four-mile marker at Sunset Boulevard, spectators at Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon banged cowbells, held out cups of water and rustled pompoms as the runners raced past. Husband-and-wife cheering squad Joseph Carrillo, 35, and Natalie Wong, 30, of Montebello waited for Wong's boss with plastic bags of pretzels and oranges. They also had a sign that read "Team Molasses" because the group was "slow and sweet," Wong said, laughing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2002 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
They must have arrived in clown cars; art gallery owner Robert Berman believes that 2,000 visitors, give or take a few, attended the opening of "A Thousand Clowns, Give or Take a Few," an exhibition of clown paintings -- yes, clown paintings -- at Berman's two gallery spaces at Santa Monica's Bergamot Station.
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