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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by spending limits enacted by state voters in November, the Los Angeles City Council said Friday that it will ask city voters in April to let it raise and spend more annually through so-called "officeholder accounts." As part of a broad package of state campaign reforms, Proposition 208 set a $10,000 limit for the officeholder accounts, starting Jan. 1. Los Angeles previously had an annual limit of $75,000.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council approved a long-awaited federal financing agreement that will help ensure a vital transportation corridor doesn't become a drain on the finances of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The vote — 13 to 0 in favor, with two council members absent — allows the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority to accept $83.7 million from the Federal Rail Administration to help fund operations of the Alameda Corridor, a 20-mile freight rail expressway linking the ports to transcontinental rail lines.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council approved a long-awaited federal financing agreement that will help ensure a vital transportation corridor doesn't become a drain on the finances of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The vote — 13 to 0 in favor, with two council members absent — allows the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority to accept $83.7 million from the Federal Rail Administration to help fund operations of the Alameda Corridor, a 20-mile freight rail expressway linking the ports to transcontinental rail lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by spending limits enacted by state voters in November, the Los Angeles City Council said Friday that it will ask city voters in April to let it raise and spend more annually through so-called "officeholder accounts." As part of a broad package of state campaign reforms, Proposition 208 set a $10,000 limit for the officeholder accounts, starting Jan. 1. Los Angeles previously had an annual limit of $75,000.
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