Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles City Energy Recovery Project
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles City Energy Recovery Project

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Low-income residents of South-Central Los Angeles opposed to the Lancer trash incinerator added an important legal ally this week when the Center for Law in the Public Interest agreed to fight the proposed project until safety questions are resolved.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
In August, 1985, Robin Cannon opened her mail and read that the city of Los Angeles was holding a community meeting to discuss plans for a trash-to-energy incineration plant. The proposed site was a vacant lot at 41st Street and Long Beach Avenue in the South-Central neighborhood where Cannon lived with her husband and four children.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
In August, 1985, Robin Cannon opened her mail and read that the city of Los Angeles was holding a community meeting to discuss plans for a trash-to-energy incineration plant. The proposed site was a vacant lot at 41st Street and Long Beach Avenue in the South-Central neighborhood where Cannon lived with her husband and four children.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved in concept the sale of the city's abandoned LANCER trash incinerator site in South-Central Los Angeles to a nonprofit group that plans to build 316 townhouses for low-income buyers. Under the plan, the Nehemiah West Housing Corp. would buy the 12-acre industrial site for $6.6 million, below the city's investment of $8 million. The project would mark the first major homeownership development in the South-Central area in a generation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
The huge trash incinerator that many city officials want to build in South-Central Los Angeles poses less risk to residents--though not necessarily to politicians--than any other such facility in the country, according to a scientific evaluation released Wednesday. The number of estimated potential cancer cases was so far below other studies, however, that the results were greeted with skepticism as soon as they were released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, declaring that residents will have to make sacrifices to ease growing traffic congestion, proposed on Thursday levying fees on trucks using city streets, increasing traffic violation fines and toughening tow-away policies. In addition, the mayor asked the City Council to extend the city's mandatory ride-sharing program, now applicable only to the largest companies, to firms with 200 or more employes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
An angry and raucous crowd disrupted a city meeting on the Lancer trash incinerator Saturday, raising new doubts whether the proposed South-Central Los Angeles project will survive a rising wave of citywide opposition. The meeting at Jefferson High School, in the neighborhood where the city has condemned land for the incinerator, began with two consultants reading prepared answers to questions posed at an earlier meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD and ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writers
Chastened by the voters of her district, Los Angeles City Council President Pat Russell emerged from the woodshed Wednesday decked out in a pair of running shoes and a brand new attitude as she announced her opposition to two large and controversial industrial projects, the Angeles Pipeline and the Lancer trash-to-energy plant.
NEWS
May 2, 1987
Under pressure from critics of trash burning, the president of the Los Angeles Board of Public Works said Friday that she will urge the city to allow extra time for public review of a study on health risks posed by the proposed Lancer trash-to-energy incinerator. Maureen Kindel said that on Wednesday she will move that the board allow 120 days for comments on the study. The city currently plans to stop taking comments after 60 days.
NEWS
May 28, 1987
Reacting to complaints from the public, the Los Angeles City Council agreed to extend the public review period for the controversial LANCER trash-to-energy plant proposal from 60 to 120 days. Opponents of the project had asked the council for a 180-day review period, saying that more time was needed to analyze the health risk from pollution from the facility's smokestack. Under the new schedule, the review period will extend to Sept. 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the hated LANCER project, an ill-fated plan by engineers and elected officials to build a Gargantuan municipal trash incinerator in a downtrodden South-Central community, was abandoned by Mayor Tom Bradley in the face of citywide environmental and neighborhood protest. Today, another dramatic vision is beckoning city planners to the bleak city-owned LANCER site--but not for the reasons that once attracted teams of garbage technocrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1988 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
When Gary Meredith moved back to his sleepy little hometown of San Gabriel after 15 years in other cities, he did not like what he saw. Old single-family homes were being flattened to make way for condominiums, rush-hour traffic clogged the city's main thoroughfares and developers were chopping down the shade trees. San Gabriel used to be one of the leafier spots in the San Gabriel Valley, said the dismayed Meredith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
After stalling for two months, the Los Angeles City Council bowed Tuesday to public pressure and Mayor Tom Bradley's wishes to kill the Lancer trash-to-energy incinerator once proposed for a plot of land near the Memorial Coliseum in the South-Central area. While the action Tuesday spells an official end to the $235-million Lancer project, it leaves open the possibility that the city might someday--perhaps sooner than later--burn its garbage rather than bury it in hillside canyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
A few miles east of downtown Los Angeles, the state's only working waste-to-energy garbage incinerator puffs away as the lone exception to that rarest of California occurrences--a nationwide trend that refuses to catch on here. The City of Commerce incinerator is small as they go, burning 300 tons of trash a day just off the Santa Ana Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, declaring that residents will have to make sacrifices to ease growing traffic congestion, proposed on Thursday levying fees on trucks using city streets, increasing traffic violation fines and toughening tow-away policies. In addition, the mayor asked the City Council to extend the city's mandatory ride-sharing program, now applicable only to the largest companies, to firms with 200 or more employes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
A team of UCLA faculty and graduate students jumped into the controversy over city trash burning Tuesday, contending that the Lancer plant proposed in South-Central Los Angeles poses a much higher risk than officials admit and would be a costly way to dispose of garbage. The UCLA group, which includes some environmental activists, urged the city to abandon its plan for three large trash-to-energy incinerators and instead to stress mass recycling to reduce the demand on canyon landfill dumps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1988 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
When Gary Meredith moved back to his sleepy little hometown of San Gabriel after 15 years in other cities, he did not like what he saw. Old single-family homes were being flattened to make way for condominiums, rush-hour traffic clogged the city's main thoroughfares and developers were chopping down the shade trees. San Gabriel used to be one of the leafier spots in the San Gabriel Valley, said the dismayed Meredith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the hated LANCER project, an ill-fated plan by engineers and elected officials to build a Gargantuan municipal trash incinerator in a downtrodden South-Central community, was abandoned by Mayor Tom Bradley in the face of citywide environmental and neighborhood protest. Today, another dramatic vision is beckoning city planners to the bleak city-owned LANCER site--but not for the reasons that once attracted teams of garbage technocrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
An angry and raucous crowd disrupted a city meeting on the Lancer trash incinerator Saturday, raising new doubts whether the proposed South-Central Los Angeles project will survive a rising wave of citywide opposition. The meeting at Jefferson High School, in the neighborhood where the city has condemned land for the incinerator, began with two consultants reading prepared answers to questions posed at an earlier meeting.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writers
In a new attack on Los Angeles' proposed Lancer trash-to-energy project, state budget conferees Thursday sought to stop development of the huge trash incinerator until the state has had time to study it. The issue came up when six members of a two-house conference committee took up a $1-million budget item to fund a study administered by the California Waste Management Board of waste management projects in California.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|