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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a new tack to rebuild the most vulnerable of quake "ghost town" buildings, a Los Angeles housing panel tentatively approved a $900,000 loan Monday to restore a crumbling Reseda apartment complex for low-income tenants. City housing officials say the loan is the first of its kind, aimed at producing low-income housing by salvaging financially troubled buildings, primarily within the 15 designated ghost towns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Since earthquake damage forced Mario De la Cruz out of his Reseda Boulevard apartment more than three years ago, the soft-spoken restaurant worker has moved his family several times in a search for affordable and safe housing. Now De la Cruz says he is confident that he has found that place. Ironically, his new home is only two buildings away from where he started. "It's a very nice, clean building, and we have very nice neighbors," said De la Cruz. "We are happy here."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a new tack to rebuild the most vulnerable of quake "ghost town" buildings, a Los Angeles housing panel tentatively approved a $900,000 loan Monday to restore a crumbling Reseda apartment complex for low-income tenants. City housing officials say the loan is the first of its kind, aimed at increasing low-income housing by salvaging financially troubled buildings, primarily within the 15 designated ghost towns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a new tack to rebuild the most vulnerable of quake "ghost town" buildings, a Los Angeles housing panel tentatively approved a $900,000 loan Monday to restore a crumbling Reseda apartment complex for low-income tenants. City housing officials say the loan is the first of its kind, aimed at increasing low-income housing by salvaging financially troubled buildings, primarily within the 15 designated ghost towns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Since earthquake damage forced Mario De la Cruz out of his Reseda Boulevard apartment more than three years ago, the soft-spoken restaurant worker has moved his family several times in a search for affordable and safe housing. Now De la Cruz says he is confident that he has found that place. Ironically, his new home is only two buildings away from where he started. "It's a very nice, clean building, and we have very nice neighbors," said De la Cruz. "We are happy here."
NEWS
October 13, 1988
Two nonprofit groups, the Los Angeles Community Design Center and the Pasadena Housing Alliance, will buy the 77-year-old YMCA building for $3.35 million and renovate it for low-income housing. The YMCA and the two groups approved the agreement last week. The agreement must be approved by the city, which is being asked to provide some of the funding. The Board of Directors is scheduled to consider the proposal at the end of the month.
NEWS
September 12, 1985
The vacant Wilson Hotel at 105 E. Olive St., a dilapidated residential hotel built in 1903, will be rehabilitated and converted into 14 apartments for low- and moderate-income senior citizens, according to Monrovia redevelopment officials.
NEWS
August 3, 1989
A historic Hollywood house that a developer wanted to demolish to make room for an apartment building was bought this week by two nonprofit groups that plan to preserve it. Preservationists say the residence, 5552 Carlton Way--known as the Nelson Dunning House after one of its early owners--is among the last pre-1910 houses left in Hollywood. It was built in 1906. The Hollywood Community Housing Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990
Though the fate of the vacant Skid Row hotel that suffered $500,000 in damage in a fire early Sunday remained unclear Monday, both Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and the building's owners vowed that plans to house 66 homeless and poor people on the property would go forward. Standing outside the Leonide Hotel on South Main Street, Bradley pledged that $1.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Hope-Net, an interfaith distributor of free food to the poor in the Mid-Wilshire area, is heading a partnership to build and manage an apartment building for low-income families. With support from the Los Angeles Community Design Center, the Los Angeles Housing Department and a mix of private and public funding sources, Hope-Net broke ground in October on a $2.9-million, 17-unit apartment building in the Mid-City area on West Boulevard between Pico and Olympic boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a new tack to rebuild the most vulnerable of quake "ghost town" buildings, a Los Angeles housing panel tentatively approved a $900,000 loan Monday to restore a crumbling Reseda apartment complex for low-income tenants. City housing officials say the loan is the first of its kind, aimed at producing low-income housing by salvaging financially troubled buildings, primarily within the 15 designated ghost towns.
REAL ESTATE
November 10, 1985
Los Angeles architects Carl Maston and Arthur F. O'Leary have received the California Council, American Institute of Architects, Special Awards for Excellence. Announcement of the awards was made at a luncheon during the 1985 California Council Conference at the Hyatt Lake Tahoe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000
A blighted section of residential North Long Beach will be redeveloped into a 90-apartment complex with a 6,000-square-foot child-care center and an outdoor play area, officials have said. The Grisham neighborhood--an area along Peace Street, Ruth Avenue and 49th Street--will be transformed under a $20-million plan approved last week by the Long Beach City Council.
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