Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions Art Gallery
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions Art Gallery

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Philosophical differences and the lack of a good working relationship with the board" prompted Roberto Bedoya's resignation as director of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, he said this week. His stepping down on Dec. 19, just seven months after Bedoya took over the top staff position at the downtown venue, was also a result of the financial hardships facing the center and the art world at large, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Artists Mourn the Death of a Great Space" screams the headline of a press release issued by a group of 10 performance artists and critics who claim that Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, a nonprofit center for edgy contemporary art in Hollywood, has abandoned its mission and no longer serves their interests. Nonsense, leaders of the embattled institution say. LACE isn't dead; it is doing what is necessary to dig itself out of a grave and get a new life that will benefit artists.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advisory council of the National Endowment for the Arts voted unanimously Friday to recommend new grants for productions by two New York performance artists whose work has been at the center of the NEA's political controversy since last May. The action by the National Council on the Arts is not binding on NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer, who declined to say how he would rule on the two applications.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
It would seem axiomatic that art dealers shouldn't be acting as guest curators for nonprofit art spaces. At stake is the institution's credibility. Why? Because its charitable purpose vanishes behind a dark cloud. The audience can't know whether the art being shown has been chosen principally to satisfy a dealer's private commercial ambitions, rather than the public interest that is the mandate of all nonprofit spaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Artists Mourn the Death of a Great Space" screams the headline of a press release issued by a group of 10 performance artists and critics who claim that Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, a nonprofit center for edgy contemporary art in Hollywood, has abandoned its mission and no longer serves their interests. Nonsense, leaders of the embattled institution say. LACE isn't dead; it is doing what is necessary to dig itself out of a grave and get a new life that will benefit artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some might consider Frank Parker lucky by Skid Row standards. An artist with his own "studio," Parker has found several small shops in which to sell his works. In addition, Parker has become fairly prominent among the surprisingly large group of artists living on Skid Row. His drawings grace the covers of publications by the Homeless Writers Coalition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above an Encino mini-mall loomed the strangest billboard on Ventura Boulevard, a sign that featured two icons of mass appeal: Mao Tse-tung and Colonel Sanders. Down below, Westec Security guards Scott Rice and Jim Miller stood beside their patrol cars, waiting for crime to strike. Why, Rice wondered, did the colonel have a red circle and a slash across his face? Seemed an odd way to sell fried chicken. "I don't get it," Rice said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts has asked Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions to remove "any acknowledgment of endowment support" from materials associated with three recent LACE projects that had erotic and homosexual themes. LACE executive director Gwen Darien said that NEA funds were not used for the activities in question and called the request a clear attempt to "target certain minorities."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I think my appointment is really a signal," said Roberto Bedoya, the new executive director of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, during his first day on the job. "It's no longer a Euro-centric world, or a Euro-centric Los Angeles, and LACE has been behind in recognizing that. I think my appointment says, 'Here is Roberto Bedoya, a person in charge of a multidisciplinary arts organization, and he's a person of color.'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
There are a lot of new faces on the staff of LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions), and with this influx of key personnel, the avant-garde arts community is watching to see if a change in direction is in store. With a budget of more than $600,000, LACE is the largest artist-run space in Los Angeles dedicated to avant-garde visual arts, music, performance art, dance, video, film and literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts has asked Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions to remove "any acknowledgment of endowment support" from materials associated with three recent LACE projects that had erotic and homosexual themes. LACE executive director Gwen Darien said that NEA funds were not used for the activities in question and called the request a clear attempt to "target certain minorities."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an urgent two-page memorandum, a "desperate call for action" from the entire eight-person paid staff of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions--the avant-garde downtown multimedia arts center best known simply as LACE. The Dec. 10 memo warned the LACE board of a cash-flow crisis, the risk of a missed payroll and "an untenable budget and little to no fiscal management" that together make a further muddle of "a time of great flux and instability."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Philosophical differences and the lack of a good working relationship with the board" prompted Roberto Bedoya's resignation as director of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, he said this week. His stepping down on Dec. 19, just seven months after Bedoya took over the top staff position at the downtown venue, was also a result of the financial hardships facing the center and the art world at large, he said.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advisory council of the National Endowment for the Arts voted unanimously Friday to recommend new grants for productions by two New York performance artists whose work has been at the center of the NEA's political controversy since last May. The action by the National Council on the Arts is not binding on NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer, who declined to say how he would rule on the two applications.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some might consider Frank Parker lucky by Skid Row standards. An artist with his own "studio," Parker has found several small shops in which to sell his works. In addition, Parker has become fairly prominent among the surprisingly large group of artists living on Skid Row. His drawings grace the covers of publications by the Homeless Writers Coalition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I think my appointment is really a signal," said Roberto Bedoya, the new executive director of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, during his first day on the job. "It's no longer a Euro-centric world, or a Euro-centric Los Angeles, and LACE has been behind in recognizing that. I think my appointment says, 'Here is Roberto Bedoya, a person in charge of a multidisciplinary arts organization, and he's a person of color.'
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
Terry Wolverton had spent much of her life on the stage. First there was performing-arts high school, then college, where she specialized in experimental theater, then a decade-long career as a performance artist. But two years ago, despite half a lifetime's investment, Wolverton, 34, gave up performing. Not because she had lost interest but because of a problem that has caused many Los Angeles performance artists, dancers and choreographers to worry about their survival here: in a word, access.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
It would seem axiomatic that art dealers shouldn't be acting as guest curators for nonprofit art spaces. At stake is the institution's credibility. Why? Because its charitable purpose vanishes behind a dark cloud. The audience can't know whether the art being shown has been chosen principally to satisfy a dealer's private commercial ambitions, rather than the public interest that is the mandate of all nonprofit spaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | BETH KLEID
The first Festival Latino L.A., which began in early May, continues at LACE tonight with "Bailando Una Pieza Sin Musica" ("Dancing Without Music"), a one-act play focusing on the joy and anguish in a love affair. Performed by an experimental theater troupe from Mexico and directed by Pablo Mandoki, the play will be performed in Spanish, todaythrough Sunday at 8 p.m. A bilingual workshop with the cast and director will be held at LACE on Saturday at 3 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above an Encino mini-mall loomed the strangest billboard on Ventura Boulevard, a sign that featured two icons of mass appeal: Mao Tse-tung and Colonel Sanders. Down below, Westec Security guards Scott Rice and Jim Miller stood beside their patrol cars, waiting for crime to strike. Why, Rice wondered, did the colonel have a red circle and a slash across his face? Seemed an odd way to sell fried chicken. "I don't get it," Rice said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|