Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles County Board
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles County Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
A prominent Latina fresh from President Obama's Cabinet wants one. A member of the Kennedy clan is eyeing another, as is the woman who made her political mark this year behind a multimillion-dollar media blitz to become Los Angeles' first female mayor. Seats on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are among the most coveted, safe and powerful local elected positions in the nation. The five current members have served a total of nearly 100 years, bolstering criticism that the board has been short on accountability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are typically reelected every four years with token opposition at most, and in former days they explained away this phenomenon by arguing that voters were so satisfied with their performance that there was a general consensus that things were going well. The lack of serious challengers, they asserted, was proof that democracy was working. That argument is so twisted as to need little serious discussion. Supervisors are consistently reelected in this county of more than 10 million people because it's nearly impossible to unseat them regardless of their performance.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 22, 2009
Auditor's investigation: An article in Sunday's Section A about an auditor's investigation of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors' dealings with the land planning department cited a civil lawsuit brought by Malibu landowner Brian Boudreau. The article incorrectly said that an e-mail provided by Boudreau's attorney, Fred Gaines, came from an aide to Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. The e-mail, which said "Project is getting very political," was sent by a public works employee; Gaines did not say it came from Yaroslavsky's office.
OPINION
February 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors can create a citizens commission to oversee the sheriff, in an effort to prevent the kinds of abuses that have been the subject of news reports, lawsuits and indictments over the last several years. But let's be clear at the outset: Neither the board nor any citizens commission it creates will have the power to reward or punish the sheriff or to give him orders. So is there any value to adding a new layer of review? There can be, if oversight is designed with care and with a deep understanding of the particular challenges presented by the office of sheriff.
NEWS
July 1, 1986
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously today to ban the sale or distribution of alkyl nitrites, commonly knowns as "poppers," in Los Angeles County. Poppers, sold as room odorants, are a stimulant often used by homosexuals to get a sexual rush and have been linked by medical authorities to the spread of AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999
The Newhall Ranch specific plan is specifically about campaign financing. Attendance at a Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting is sufficient to see the power of the legal bribes called campaign contributions. How can Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael Antonovich be expected to make an objective decision about the fate of the project known as Newhall Ranch when the vast and powerful corporation that owns the property has given thousands of dollars to get Mr. Antonovich elected?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1990
In the latest edition of Time magazine, it states that in the 115-year history of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, there has been only white men elected to it. Can you imagine that? This is the most multiracial county in the nation and yet we have the most enduring bastion of white supremacy in the country. It is also the most undemocratic political entity since it has broad legislative, executive and semi-judicial powers unlike any in the nation. Why do we allow this to go on?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993
In response to "County's Trail Fees Leading to Confusion," Jan. 7: The county's new law requiring annual passes for anyone using county nature trails and public parks is more than confusing. It's simply incredible! The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and other fat politicians have once again driven another confirming spike into this county's coffin. With today's economic climate and social frustrations, a stroll on what's left of the county's sanctum now requires a price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1988
RTD board members vote to raise the basic fare 29% to $1.10 from 85 cents at the same time they launch a campaign to give away hundreds of thousands of free bus tokens. What sense does that make? The board has also announced plans for drastic service cuts in the very near future. What makes this so pernicious is that recently changed federal regulations allow a line to be cut up to 25% without first holding a public hearing as was required in the past. The board members say they had no choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1993
I applaud the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors' recent vote against a potential increase in property owners' fire assessment fees (May 12). These fees could potentially have increased from approximately $36 each year to almost $200 per household, affecting homeowners in the unincorporated county and the 48 cities served by the County Fire Department. There is no doubt that the County Fire Department provides a very necessary service, and that the department does an admirable job protecting the communities it serves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Don Knabe was named chairman of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, and used his opening remarks to call for reforming the bureaucracy to make it more responsive to the county's 10 million residents. “Interacting with the county should be as easy as making a purchase on Amazon,” Knabe said. “But we must realize that innovation should not just be updating old technologies and developing apps for smartphones. It should be about changing our overall culture to be more responsive to the needs of our residents.
OPINION
October 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Less than a month ago, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted to spend $75 million to send 500 long-term inmates to a Kern County facility in an effort to ease jail overcrowding. Now, citing legal concerns, the board seems inclined to pull the plug on the plan. Supervisor Gloria Molina withdrew her support because she was worried the county could be drawn into a messy ongoing lawsuit between the state and officials in Kern. Apparently, county lawyers failed to inform the board about the lawsuit before the supervisors voted on the contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
A prominent Latina fresh from President Obama's Cabinet wants one. A member of the Kennedy clan is eyeing another, as is the woman who made her political mark this year behind a multimillion-dollar media blitz to become Los Angeles' first female mayor. Seats on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are among the most coveted, safe and powerful local elected positions in the nation. The five current members have served a total of nearly 100 years, bolstering criticism that the board has been short on accountability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Reacting to a Supreme Court ruling that struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution Tuesday urging federal leaders to pass legislation to update the act so that it protects voters from disenfranchisement and passes Constitutional muster. “We want to keep democracy vibrant and make sure all those who wish to participate and have a right to participate not be denied” the ability to vote, said board chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who sponsored the motion along with Supervisor Gloria Molina.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Robert Greene
Our editorial page counterparts at the Daily News and its sibling publications around the county took off after the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Sunday for trying to change the law to make it OK for them to have closed-door meetings with the governor, like the three sessions that got the supes in trouble back in 2011. Good on you, Daily News folks. Let 'em have it. And good on the editorial pages at other California newspapers like the Desert Sun (Palm Springs, Coachella Valley)
OPINION
August 6, 2012 | Jim Newton
There is a serious conversation worth having about term limits and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Supporters of the limits - currently three terms of four years each - argue that they are necessary because once supervisors are in office, they're impervious to challenge. Their districts are too big, scrutiny too light, their ability to raise money too great. Critics say term limits deprive voters of choice, imbue the bureaucracy with too much power and ensure that the government is run by inexperienced leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Don Knabe was named chairman of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, and used his opening remarks to call for reforming the bureaucracy to make it more responsive to the county's 10 million residents. “Interacting with the county should be as easy as making a purchase on Amazon,” Knabe said. “But we must realize that innovation should not just be updating old technologies and developing apps for smartphones. It should be about changing our overall culture to be more responsive to the needs of our residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1988
Thank you for your editorial "Dwindling Open Space" (Aug. 8) in which you addressed the question of the need for open space in the Los Angeles area. The residents of the Calabasas-Agoura-Thousand Oaks region are only too aware of the problems of big development versus pristine open space. As a native Southern Californian, I have observed the devastation of many naturally beautiful places over the past 30 years. While you correctly summarized the problems concerning the Cheeseboro Canyon-Jordan Ranch development, and the potential stance of the Ventura County Board of Supervisors on this matter, another governing body needs to be fingered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky delivered pointed criticism Tuesday of a move to place a measure on the November ballot that would ask voters to extend term limits that now stand to oust four members of the board. Yaroslavsky pointed out that the motion, written by Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, could undo a law approved by voters a decade ago that limited supervisors to three terms. "I just think this makes a mockery of us," Yaroslavsky said. The board ended up postponing the issue for a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Every night that there's a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, its operator, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, sends beams of light into the sky above. The purpose isn't to create a lot of showbiz hoopla, says Deborah Borda, the Philharmonic's president and chief executive. It's to tell pilots of helicopters and small aircraft to stay the heck away. But increasingly, Borda says, attempts to communicate both in light and in words have fallen on deafening ears. Not a summer concert night goes by now, she says, without the purity of music falling prey to choppers dealing noise pollution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|