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Los Angeles County Borders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sand Canyon, the city of Santa Clarita bans curbs, sidewalks and street lights, to better preserve the rural equestrian atmosphere. But at the border, concrete gutters appear, discouraging horses but pleasing planners for Los Angeles County. In the Santa Clarita Valley, the tip-off of the city-county boundary is often the abrupt disappearance of a bike lane or equestrian trail. Bulldozers carve cliffs into hillsides on one side of a freeway, while the other is smoothly graded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sand Canyon, the city of Santa Clarita bans curbs, sidewalks and street lights, to better preserve the rural equestrian atmosphere. But at the border, concrete gutters appear, discouraging horses but pleasing planners for Los Angeles County. In the Santa Clarita Valley, the tip-off of the city-county boundary is often the abrupt disappearance of a bike lane or equestrian trail. Bulldozers carve cliffs into hillsides on one side of a freeway, while the other is smoothly graded.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As jazz labels consolidate and shrink rosters, more and more musicians are beingleft to their own devices when it comes to recording and distributing their music. The Internet has brought unsigned artists a measure of accessibility to the jazz audience, but getting noticed among the burgeoning number of commercial and individual Web sites, as well as the resulting expense of posting such notice, can be discouraging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
Wild grass grows on the hillsides of Lopez Canyon. Deer stop to munch before galloping away. To the north spread the mountains of the Angeles National Forest. Lopez Canyon doesn't look like a dump, but it was one for 21 years until it took its last load of garbage in 1996. Those who live in the surrounding northeastern San Fernando Valley have for decades felt like their home has been the dumping ground of choice for dismantled automobiles, recyclables and all sorts of other garbage.
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