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Los Angeles County Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989
Prepared by Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon, the $9.2-billion spending plan proposed Friday will be presented to the Board of Supervisors next week. HIGHLIGHTS Highest Los Angeles County budget ever, up 1.7% (or $160 million) from this year. Reserves $10 million for the supervisors to supplement or add programs. Would reduce the county staff to 75,821, down from 76,217. Reflects county's "extreme dependence" on the state. Health, mental health, probation camps and fire suppression camps are significantly curtailed due to state funding reductions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The county Board of Supervisors has adopted a $16-billion budget for the coming fiscal year. Most of the money--nearly $13 billion--is federal and state funds earmarked for specific programs. Of the remaining money, $1.4 billion will be spent on public safety. The budget varied little from the chief administrative officer's proposed budget, released in April. One change was an additional $41.1 million in revenues passed down from the state. Most of that, $32.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992 | AMY PYLE
The last in a series of community meetings about the proposed 1992-93 Los Angeles County budget has been scheduled for July 12 in Palmdale. County Administrative Officer Richard Dixon will conduct the meeting, which will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Citizens Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, at the corner of 10th Street East.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County government expects to nearly double its energy bill for next year, from $75 million to a whopping $140 million, a hike that will cut into the county's surplus and could force service cuts if prices continue to rise through what all sides predict will be a difficult year in the state's energy crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare display of unity to dramatize Los Angeles County's budget plight, the Board of Supervisors has canceled today's board meeting to allow all five members to travel to Sacramento for discussions with Gov. Pete Wilson and key state legislators. The board members say they will express their opposition to a variety of Wilson budget proposals--including a plan to shift $2.6 billion in property tax revenue from local governments to the state--when they meet with the governor this morning.
NEWS
May 20, 1993
Although they pay for their sheriff's deputy patrols by the minute, Malibu and four West Valley cities served by the Lost Hills/Malibu sheriff's station could get less law enforcement service next fiscal year if proposed cuts in the Los Angeles County budget are approved. About two-thirds of the $12-million budget at the station comes from contracts with Malibu, Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Hidden Hills and Westlake Village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key source of funds for the precariously balanced Los Angeles County budget is now in jeopardy, as the result of a new study that shows a surprise weakening in the finances of the county's giant retirement fund. According to a financial study obtained by The Times, the deficit at the pension fund grew by $362 million during the past year. That finding, scheduled to be presented to the Los Angeles County Retirement Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | EDMUND D. EDELMAN, Edmund D. Edelman represents the Third District on the Board of Supervisors. and The 'soft-landing' budget could become a crash landing when the bills for the compromise come due in future years
Last week, on a 4-1 vote, the Board of Supervisors gave preliminary approval to a 1992-93 Los Angeles County budget that has been hailed by its supporters as "historic," as a "consensus" proposal signifying a "victory for the people." I respectfully but firmly disagree. In an effort to avoid pain and sacrifice today, this $13-billion spending plan--negotiated in private meetings without the benefit of public scrutiny and debate--simply postpones the day of reckoning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1987
Supervisors in many counties around the state will commence on Monday the traumatic process of slashing their health, social-service, probation and other budgets to conform to the cuts in state funding imposed by Gov. George Deukmejian. For San Diego and Orange counties there is limited effect, although at least one clinic will lose its doctor, but Los Angeles County faces the most painful cuts of all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987
The Los Angeles County budget grows larger every year, but, when adjusted for inflation, the power of its dollars is actually shrinking. There is in effect less money, yet more than twice as much to do. The choices are tough, and, because of state requirements, the choices are few. Counties must run jails and courts, provide medical care for poor people, pay for general relief and emergency housing for homeless people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite significant pressure on the Los Angeles County budget that could force the closure of medical clinics in poor neighborhoods, Sheriff Lee Baca is pushing for a plan to invest more than $50 million in the dilapidated Hall of Justice, where he would like to relocate. "There are practical reasons and aesthetic reasons," he said. "The sheriff of the largest county in the U.S. needs to be in close proximity with the county Board of Supervisors, City Hall and the chief of police."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000
Confirming the county's current fiscal health despite a spat over how it will fund its massive health department, Wall Street agencies Tuesday gave the county's tax and revenue anticipation notes their highest rating for short-term debt. The $600 million in notes, to be sold later this week, will provide the county with enough cash to fund its $15-billion operation until the first installment of property taxes arrives in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly pessimistic about the federal government's willingness to keep Los Angeles County's public health system solvent, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to freeze all hiring and contracts in their Department of Health Services should Washington decline to extend its $1-billion waiver of Medicaid rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under criticism for previous bloated budget requests, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca unveiled streamlined spending priorities Thursday, offering the Board of Supervisors a choice between funding his three top initiatives by adding just $5 million to his department's $1.4-billion budget or of financing all 22 of his proposed new projects with a $131-million boost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
State officials have canceled a crucial meeting in Washington that had been scheduled for today on renewing the federal waiver that keeps Los Angeles County's health care system afloat. The action led the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday to send a letter to the governor urging him to aid them in extending the $1-billion plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County officials Tuesday found themselves confronting a possibility that until recently seemed unthinkable: losing the keystone of their budget, a $1-billion federal waiver of Medicaid rules that has kept public hospitals open and the county out of bankruptcy. President Clinton announced the waiver in 1995 in a dramatic, last-ditch act that saved the county from insolvency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proposed budget cuts in health and welfare services triggered separate protests in the San Fernando Valley on Thursday, with social workers staging a brief walkout in Canoga Park and community activists and nurses marching in support of a Pacoima health clinic targeted for closure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To tackle Los Angeles County budget problems, participants in a Santa Clarita public forum suggested government reforms that included abolishing the U. S. Constitution, staffing prisons with federal troops and not issuing birth certificates. The creative suggestions came after Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who hosted the forum, called for the state to not pull back $2.6 billion in property tax revenue from county governments. He urged the public to write their state legislators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release of Los Angeles County's proposed 2000-01 budget involved a bit of PR judo Monday, as the union representing the majority of county workers said that the rosy budget picture means employees should be paid more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The creme de la creme of what they call "the county family"--administrators, bureaucrats, politicians past and present--gathered recently at the Music Center to bid farewell to the woman who had kept the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors' meetings running as smoothly as possible during some of the county's most tumultuous times.
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