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Los Angeles County Contracts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The officials who control Los Angeles County beaches thought that lifeguards should make a bolder fashion statement, the popularity of "Baywatch" notwithstanding. But a resulting deal with Izod has many lifeguards fuming this week over their new red, black and white togs, complete with the prominent logo of the clothing manufacturer. They say that the new uniforms are unprofessional and downright ugly, with their bold stripes and baggier fits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's top technology officer violated conflict-of-interest law in his handling of a $250-million telecommunications contract and a subsequent order that all county agencies buy equipment from Cisco Systems, a company in which he owns stock, according to a confidential audit obtained Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four years, Los Angeles County paid millions of dollars to a private network of community clinics run by a doctor who was supposed to be working at a public hospital while earning his six-figure county salary, according to health department officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001
One of the largest East Los Angeles clinics serving poor people will no longer receive county money to treat the uninsured because undercover county investigators said they discovered it was improperly charging destitute patients for care while also charging the county for those same services. The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to kill Community Health Foundation of East Los Angeles' $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An exhaustive audit has found that because of lax controls, a vast array of Los Angeles County transportation contracts skyrocketed in cost after new expenses were routinely added on after initial approval of the agreements. In one case, auditors found that a consulting contract for the proposed Green Line grew from $1.4 million to $64.4 million in one year--a 4,511% increase. In all, the study showed that contracts increased an average of 388% after they were awarded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Court-appointed attorneys may have overbilled Los Angeles County by as much as $1.5 million during the last two years, according to a county audit. Among the examples of possible abuses was the case of top-paid lawyer Ray Newman, who billed the county for working on cases every day last year, including weekends and holidays, Tyler McCauley, chief of the auditor-controller's audit division, said Wednesday. Newman earned more than $1 million in 1988 and 1989 by handling county cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court has found that two Los Angeles transit investigators appear to have been fired in 1990 for raising allegations of an agency cover-up and confronting their boss about it. The state 2nd District Court of Appeal, in a ruling issued last week, refused to throw out several key claims made by the investigators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH
Both ambulance companies embroiled in a dispute over alleged problems in relaying emergency calls have been summoned by Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich to a closed meeting Wednesday at Santa Clarita City Hall to discuss possible solutions to the dispute. Representatives of Wilson Ambulance Co., headquartered in Palmdale, and Santa Clarita Ambulance Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winning a Los Angeles County contract for aerial firefighting has become big business. First there was the Canadian aircraft manufacturer that hired one of the biggest and most powerful public relations firms in the nation to make the name Super Scooper a household word. Now a helicopter manufacturer in Oregon has adopted the same marketing strategy. If you don't already know what an Erickson Air-Crane Helitanker is, you probably will soon.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one choice chunk of real estate--on the water, on the Westside, close to freeways and the airport. Marina del Rey--anchored by the world's largest man-made small-craft harbor--is owned by the public and managed by Los Angeles County. The marina was conceived in the late 1950s as a money-making partnership between government and business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the largest private health groups serving indigent East Los Angeles residents is expected today to lose contracts with the county worth $3.4 million amid allegations that it turned away destitute patients or improperly charged them for services that also were billed to the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the largest private health groups serving indigent East Los Angeles residents is expected today to lose contracts with the county worth $3.4 million amid allegations that it turned away destitute patients or improperly charged them for services that also were billed to the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite objections from bus riders and the losing bidders, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority approved a $20.8-million contract Thursday to begin engineering work for a six-mile light rail line from Union Station deep into the Eastside. As is often the case with the MTA, the decision to award a key contract for the $760-million rail project was immediately controversial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four years, Los Angeles County paid millions of dollars to a private network of community clinics run by a doctor who was supposed to be working at a public hospital while earning his six-figure county salary, according to health department officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only the MTA or the guys who sold Manhattan would think this is a deal: The transit agency's board voted Thursday to give a billboard company the rights to as much as $50 million in outdoor advertising space for 10 years in exchange for 10 toilets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The officials who control Los Angeles County beaches thought that lifeguards should make a bolder fashion statement, the popularity of "Baywatch" notwithstanding. But a resulting deal with Izod has many lifeguards fuming this week over their new red, black and white togs, complete with the prominent logo of the clothing manufacturer. They say that the new uniforms are unprofessional and downright ugly, with their bold stripes and baggier fits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's plan to pay $7.8 million a year for an inexperienced Virginia firm to run the new state-mandated workfare program was called illegal Friday by the Deukmejian Administration and ridiculed by Democratic lawmakers. Los Angeles, like all other counties in the state, was supposed to have begun the Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) workfare program by Sept. 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1995
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department won an $8-million contract Friday to provide security on Metrolink trains, beating out the Metropolitan Transportation Authority transit police. The Southern California Regional Rail Authority Board of Directors, which oversees operation of Metrolink trains, voted to renew its contract with the Sheriff's Department to provide security on six train routes. The department has been providing security on the trains since Metrolink began operating in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As union members shouted "shame!" over and over, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday awarded $23 million in contracts to two corporations to run part of the county's job-training and placement service for welfare recipients. The contract has been a contentious issue for two years, as supporters argued that it would save taxpayers $4.2 million, but opponents said it was handing corporations money that should go to poor families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000
The County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a new contract for sheriff's deputies that calls for a 9% raise over three years. The supervisors unanimously approved the contract, which includes an unprecedented bonus to reward deputies who remain in patrol jobs rather than seek promotions or transfers. The 2% bonus applies to deputies who have three or more years on patrol. Deputies rejected the contract in February, then overwhelming approved it this month. The Assn.
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