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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of setting the wheels of justice in motion has gone up, making the legal system that much more inaccessible for the poor, advocates say. Beginning late last month, the cost of filing lawsuits, responding to lawsuits, contesting wills, filing for divorce or taking other legal actions went up, in many cases by nearly $100. The fee increases are designed to raise $93 million statewide annually.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County court system, the largest local system in the nation, could be broke within a few weeks because the state owes it millions of dollars, the presiding judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court said Tuesday. The Municipal and Superior courts face a $21-million budgetary shortfall, and the Superior Court may not be able to pay its 2,400 employees on June 15, Robert W. Parkin, presiding judge of the Superior Court, told state court administrators in a letter Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1998 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County on Thursday delivered a clear message to the state: It's time to pay the mounting local legal bill triggered by enforcement of California's three-strikes sentencing law. The cost so far: a couple hundred million dollars and rising. A squad of county officials urged an obscure but powerful state finance board to order California to pony up the funds to meet skyrocketing costs of arresting, prosecuting and defending criminals under the law enacted four years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1998 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County on Thursday delivered a clear message to the state: It's time to pay the mounting local legal bill triggered by enforcement of California's three-strikes sentencing law. The cost so far: a couple hundred million dollars and rising. A squad of county officials urged an obscure but powerful state finance board to order California to pony up the funds to meet skyrocketing costs of arresting, prosecuting and defending criminals under the law enacted four years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Robert Brandel burst through the doors of Van Nuys Superior Court and into the afternoon sunshine, a wide smile split his face as he looked skyward and exulted: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God, I'm free at last!" Brandel, repeating a phrase from a spiritual made famous in a Martin Luther King Jr. speech, wasn't a prisoner given his walking papers and his first taste of freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1993 | TOMMY LI
The County Board of Supervisors is expected to give a commendation to Glendale Municipal Court officials for their frugality in saving $682,000 from a nearly $5-million 1992-93 courthouse budget. "We're very flattered and honored," said James Rogan, Glendale Municipal Court's presiding judge. "We are a far more efficient court today than we were a year ago or so."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1995
The trial of O. J. Simpson has cost Los Angeles County more than $2.4 million, already making it one of the most expensive cases in county history, according to the latest tabulations released Wednesday. In the first figures to reflect jury sequestration, the county's expenses increased $718,519 in January. The cost of housing, feeding and protecting the jury, which has been sequestered since Jan. 11, totaled $197,814, according to Auditor-Controller Alan T. Sasaki.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County court system, the largest local system in the nation, could be broke within a few weeks because the state owes it millions of dollars, the presiding judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court said Tuesday. The Municipal and Superior courts face a $21-million budgetary shortfall, and the Superior Court may not be able to pay its 2,400 employees on June 15, Robert W. Parkin, presiding judge of the Superior Court, told state court administrators in a letter Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jury duty in Los Angeles County--a civic obligation for some, an exercise in eye-watering boredom for others--is about to be cut in half. Within the next 30 days, jury service in Municipal and Superior courts countywide will be reduced from 10 days to five, a move that will save about $2.2 million a year in mileage and fees paid to prospective jurors who mostly end up sitting around, court administrators announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1995
The trial of O. J. Simpson has cost Los Angeles County more than $2.4 million, already making it one of the most expensive cases in county history, according to the latest tabulations released Wednesday. In the first figures to reflect jury sequestration, the county's expenses increased $718,519 in January. The cost of housing, feeding and protecting the jury, which has been sequestered since Jan. 11, totaled $197,814, according to Auditor-Controller Alan T. Sasaki.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1993 | TOMMY LI
The County Board of Supervisors is expected to give a commendation to Glendale Municipal Court officials for their frugality in saving $682,000 from a nearly $5-million 1992-93 courthouse budget. "We're very flattered and honored," said James Rogan, Glendale Municipal Court's presiding judge. "We are a far more efficient court today than we were a year ago or so."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of setting the wheels of justice in motion has gone up, making the legal system that much more inaccessible for the poor, advocates say. Beginning late last month, the cost of filing lawsuits, responding to lawsuits, contesting wills, filing for divorce or taking other legal actions went up, in many cases by nearly $100. The fee increases are designed to raise $93 million statewide annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Robert Brandel burst through the doors of Van Nuys Superior Court and into the afternoon sunshine, a wide smile split his face as he looked skyward and exulted: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God, I'm free at last!" Brandel, repeating a phrase from a spiritual made famous in a Martin Luther King Jr. speech, wasn't a prisoner given his walking papers and his first taste of freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jury duty in Los Angeles County--a civic obligation for some, an exercise in eye-watering boredom for others--is about to be cut in half. Within the next 30 days, jury service in Municipal and Superior courts countywide will be reduced from 10 days to five, a move that will save about $2.2 million a year in mileage and fees paid to prospective jurors who mostly end up sitting around, court administrators announced.
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