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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Using a computerized lottery system, Los Angeles County this week chose its first civil grand jury. The 23 grand jurors and four alternates were chosen Wednesday in Superior Court, said Kyle Christopherson, a court spokesman. Because existing grand juries focused far more on criminal indictments than civil investigations, the county decided last year to split criminal and civil grand juries. Civil grand jurors will serve from July 1 to June 30, 2002, Christopherson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1998 | JON STEINMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The presiding judge here is threatening to move all jury trials out of town unless free parking is made available to jurors, setting off tremors in Los Angeles County's Superior Court system. "Except for January 1994, when we had to find temporary parking in Van Nuys for jurors and court staff because structures were coming down [after the Northridge earthquake], I've never heard of a parking situation like this," said Gloria Gomez, county manager of juror services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tensions exploded in a Compton courtroom Tuesday during a tumultuous day in which three young men were found guilty of murdering 17-year-old Corie Williams, an innocent high school student hit by bullets fired into an MTA bus in a gang feud. Just moments after the jury announced its verdict, as family members wailed in disapproval and one defendant was taken away, defendant Randall Amado sprang from his chair and vaulted toward the prosecutor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivering good and bad news, county officials announced Wednesday that a long-awaited juvenile dependency court will open Tuesday in Lancaster, but said local families with existing cases will continue to have to travel to the main court in distant Monterey Park.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 10 years, Los Angeles County's Master Courthouse Construction Program has spent almost $80 million without adding a single new courtroom to one of the nation's most congested criminal and civil justice systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it "Catalina Law." Here in a one-room courthouse 26 miles across the sea, the bailiffs wear shorts, clerks greet residents by name, and the island's only judge hops out by copter or ferry for one day a week. Despite its sandal-clad informality, Catalina Municipal Court is a bustling outpost of law and order, where Judge Peter Mirich brings out all the accouterments of a courtroom--a prosecutor, a defense attorney, a court reporter--to dispense a day's worth of island justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1989
Deputy Los Angeles County Counsel Lester J. Tolnai failed Thursday to persuade Superior Court Judge Kurt J. Lewin that 190 of the county's courtroom clerks should work next Monday, when the county's more than 300 state courts will be closed in observance of Abraham Lincoln's birthday. Lewin ruled that a new state law establishing a dozen uniform holidays a year in all 58 counties for California "officers and employees of the courts" is "crystal clear."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are witnesses to depravity who often get forgotten once they leave the jury box. Jurors in sensational trials--such as the 12 Orange County residents now deciding whether serial killer Charles Ng should die for his crimes--are forced to confront a haunting side of human nature. And what they see is often hard to shake. Until recently, jurors left court with little more than a cursory "thank you" from the judge, forcing them to deal alone with the emotional aftereffects.
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County court officials announced Tuesday that they will adopt a system requiring most prospective jurors to report for jury duty only for one day unless they are selected for a trial. The change, to begin in May and be in effect in all courts by the end of 1999, represents a reversal of an earlier decision by county court authorities. It will give citizens significant relief from what is widely regarded as the most onerous of civic responsibilities.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case was a double murder, gang-related and gory--standard fare these days at the Criminal Courts Building in downtown Los Angeles. Deputy Dist. Atty. Ralph Shapiro estimated it would take five months to seat a jury and try the case. What Shapiro did not factor in was the work habits of Superior Court Judge Clarence (Red) Stromwall, a retired police detective who sports military-like service stripes on the sleeve of his black robe.
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