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Los Angeles County Economy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USC research faculty give mixed grades to Southern California's economic, social and physical conditions in a second annual report card to be released Tuesday. The survey by USC's Southern California Studies Center finds hopeful trends about the job market but raises serious concerns about housing costs and decaying infrastructure. "All things considered, we are doing pretty well economically. However, some of the clouds on the horizon are troublesome.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | by Walter Hamilton
The Special Olympics will have a significant economic benefit for Los Angeles, according to a study released Thursday. The games being held in the summer of 2015 will generate at least $415 million in economic activity for the county, according to the study by a research firm working for the Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board. The games are expected to draw more than 7,000 athletes and 500,000 spectators to the Los Angeles area, according to the Special Olympics website.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles area still may be a glamour capital, but as a place to make money, its status is fading fast. An analysis released Wednesday by UCLA business analysts ranked Los Angeles County only 100th among 318 U.S. urban areas in personal income. It found that the county's per capita personal income was $26,773 in 1998, the most recent year for which federal figures are available. Although the personal income of Los Angeles County residents climbed 4.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2003 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County economy should begin recovering by mid-2003, but the rebound will be a weak one, according to a forecast to be released today by Chapman University. Chapman economists expect employers in the county to begin adding jobs again this year after a loss of 18,200 payroll positions in 2002. But the gains will be paltry -- only about 3,000 jobs, or 0.1% growth -- and probably not enough to stop the county's unemployment rate from rising. The jobless rate was 6.2% in December.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2003 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County economy should begin recovering by mid-2003, but the rebound will be a weak one, according to a forecast to be released today by Chapman University. Chapman economists expect employers in the county to begin adding jobs again this year after a loss of 18,200 payroll positions in 2002. But the gains will be paltry -- only about 3,000 jobs, or 0.1% growth -- and probably not enough to stop the county's unemployment rate from rising. The jobless rate was 6.2% in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weathering the worst recession since the Depression and enduring massive job losses, Los Angeles County's economy is slowly recovering, even in the hard-hit aerospace industry, the chief economist of a business-backed group said Tuesday. The county economy "has hit bottom" but "is headed in the right direction," Jack Kyser of the Economic Development Corp. of Los Angeles County told the Board of Supervisors. "We think it will keep going in 1996 and 1997 . . .
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sacre bleu! A weak euro coupled with a healthy Southern California economy helped propel the Golden State past France to rank as the world's fifth-largest economy if it were a separate nation, according to a report released this week. Figures from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. placed the 2000 gross state product at $1.33 trillion, just ahead of France at $1.28 trillion, and behind the United Kingdom at $1.42 trillion. In 1999, France ranked No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economists and business leaders opposed to the "Buy American" measure on Tuesday's ballot say its passage could drive away foreign investment needed to help rebuild Los Angeles after the riots. "We simply cannot afford this measure now because we need all the allies we can get," said David Friedman, an attorney with the law firm Tuttle & Taylor and research fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Japan Program.
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
Thanks to a vibrant and diverse economy that is creating an abundance of low-skilled, entry-level jobs needed by people coming off welfare, Los Angeles County is expected to weather the economic disruptions that will inevitably result from the end of federal funding for public assistance. And the county's economy should continue to grow strongly, despite the burdens placed on it, because it enjoys prominence in several industries that are among the fastest growing in the world.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians know the difference between Orange and Los Angeles counties. It's Disneyland vs. the Getty Center. Republicans vs. Democrats. The Orange Crush vs. the East L.A. Interchange. But to a committee of federal bureaucrats deciding how to collect economic data, Los Angeles and Orange counties are a single unit of smog-filled urban sprawl. The panel is moving ahead with a proposal to combine the two counties when reporting economic statistics.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If the economy were a game show, Southern California's counties might turn to Los Angeles and say: "You are the weakest link." In the business world, though, there is no bullying master of ceremonies to pronounce judgment. Instead, statistics tell the story: The L.A. core has been losing its middle class and providing fewer opportunities for its poor, low-skilled residents. Neighboring counties are gaining good-paying jobs and attracting growth industries such as high technology.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home values in Los Angeles and Orange counties continued growing at a vigorous pace last month, led by sharp gains among moderately priced houses, according to a report released Tuesday. Sales of homes in Los Angeles County also exceeded expectations as consumers brushed aside concerns about the sluggish economy to take advantage of low mortgage rates. Analysts said the latest results suggest that the region's housing market will hold up well during the peak summer home-buying months.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sacre bleu! A weak euro coupled with a healthy Southern California economy helped propel the Golden State past France to rank as the world's fifth-largest economy if it were a separate nation, according to a report released this week. Figures from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. placed the 2000 gross state product at $1.33 trillion, just ahead of France at $1.28 trillion, and behind the United Kingdom at $1.42 trillion. In 1999, France ranked No.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drop in business and leisure travel led hotels in Los Angeles County--particularly high-end properties--to post increasingly lower occupancy rates through the first three months of this year, according to an industry survey. The report by PKF Consulting in Los Angeles reflects a weaker economy that could lead to higher vacancy rates into the summer, tourism officials said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A new economy is emerging in the 26 communities from Long Beach to Vernon known as the Gateway Cities, but not without doubts and anxieties over what it means for the quality of life--and work--in the area. It's an economy heavily based on international trade, which continues to grow at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. And it's an economy that will be spurred and changed by the nation's largest public works project, the $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gap between rich and poor in Los Angeles County is increasing, with African Americans and Latinos, especially women, being hardest hit by the mounting inequality, according to a study released Thursday by national researchers.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If Los Angeles were a corporation, it would have been restructured long ago and might even be a candidate for breakup today. That observation is pertinent right now because the San Fernando Valley is making noises about seceding from the city, as are San Pedro and Wilmington. It's doubly pertinent, because Los Angeles the city and the larger entity, Los Angeles County, are visibly broke.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aerospace bust in Los Angeles County will deliver a devastating blow reaching into every sector of society and the economy, resulting in the loss of as many as 420,000 jobs by 1995, according to a comprehensive new report to be released today. The nation's most defense-dependent region by a wide margin, Los Angeles County will have to come to terms with the loss of $84.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than two weeks after it began, a strike against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has put thousands of extra cars on Los Angeles' streets and freeways, cost businesses about $40 million, caused large numbers of people to miss medical appointments, and kept many from work and school. But on Monday, the eventual impact remained unclear as mechanics and supervisors agreed to return to work while the drivers continued on strike.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians know the difference between Orange and Los Angeles counties. It's Disneyland vs. the Getty Center. Republicans vs. Democrats. The Orange Crush vs. the East L.A. Interchange. But to a committee of federal bureaucrats deciding how to collect economic data, Los Angeles and Orange counties are a single unit of smog-filled urban sprawl. The panel is moving ahead with a proposal to combine the two counties when reporting economic statistics.
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