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Los Angeles County Federal Aid

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995 | JOSH MEYER and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After struggling to survive its worst-ever fiscal crisis this year, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors was told Thursday to brace for a "tidal wave" of bad news in the coming months, as Republicans in Congress push to dramatically slash funding for social programs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Los Angeles County and the state and federal governments inched closer to a deal to fund the nation's second-largest public health system Tuesday, more than 150 doctors, workers and patients marched on the county Hall of Administration demanding a swift end to the delays, which have thrown their futures in doubt. "I'm here to talk about a crime," Beth Osthimer, a lawyer with San Fernando Valley Neighborhood Legal Services, said to a cheering crowd of doctors, workers and uninsured patients.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Starting in two weeks, the Los Angeles Unified School District will inaugurate a four-year program for adults seeking permanent residency under the new immigration law, but officials are still uncertain if they will have enough funds to get past the first semester. Before it has even begun, the special program is already the subject of bureaucratic wrangling over its scope and cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1995, it took thousands of layoffs, newspaper headlines blaring about an imminent health care disaster and the calling in of numerous political chits to secure a $1-billion federal bailout of the Los Angeles County health system. The rescue came because the federal government waived Medicaid regulations that would have prevented the county from being fully reimbursed for care given at outpatient clinics rather than at more costly hospitals. This time it was going to be different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1996
Hundreds of disadvantaged youths have found employment across Southeast Los Angeles County through a federally funded Youth Corps project. The program employs and provides education to 16- to 21-year-olds while maintaining parks, athletic fields and street medians throughout Artesia, Bellflower, Cerritos, Downey, Hawaiian Gardens, Lakewood and Norwalk.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a special agent with the U.S. government, Terri Price has been trained to operate high-tech surveillance equipment, sweep crime scenes for the most delicate clues and fire a 9-millimeter Beretta handgun with deadly accuracy. But Price's investigations only occasionally require surveillance, rarely involve crime scenes and never end in shootouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1999
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday accepted a $53-million settlement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs to county facilities damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, ending a multiyear dispute. By accepting FEMA's offer, the supervisors decided not to go to court to seek the more than $700 million officials had believed the county was entitled to under a strict reading of federal law.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1999 | Jesus Sanchez
The Department of Housing and Urban Development announced about $31 million in Economic Development Initiative grants and loan guarantees for projects in Los Angeles County. The grants and guarantees--which enable communities to borrow money at reduced rates--will help finance projects in Huntington Park, Long Beach, Monterey Park and Santa Fe Springs. Huntington Park was allocated $7.8 million to develop a new downtown retail and entertainment development.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More accustomed to hearing pleas for money than making them, Los Angeles County's five supervisors will press the federal government today to extend a billion-dollar health care waiver--although the county has not fulfilled all the promises it made to win the exemption four years ago. The waiver, a change in federal rules governing Medicaid spending that helped the county stave off bankruptcy in 1995, does not expire until next year.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Realizing a 20-year dream of environmentalists, officials announced Tuesday that $5.5 million in federal funds will be used to complete the longest coastal hiking trail in Los Angeles County, stretching from the Pacific Palisades to Point Mugu in Ventura County. The money will fund the purchase of up to 400 acres of private mountain terrain that will complete the long-sought 70-mile hiking and wildlife corridor through the Santa Monica Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Organized labor entered the fray over who will fund Los Angeles County's massive public health system as more than 120 workers and patients rallied outside a county clinic Thursday demanding the extension of a key federal waiver that has allowed the system to remain solvent. It was largely through the political muscle of the Service Employees International Union that the Clinton administration granted a last-minute $1-billion bailout in 1995 to stave off the county's looming bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Gustavo Rodriguez flew to Mexico to get a liver biopsy to determine that he had hepatitis C because he couldn't obtain timely treatment at the public hospital a few miles from his East Los Angeles home. Christina Russi had to pull out her own infected tooth because she had no health insurance, and was trapped in her house for six weeks with scabies and no access to a doctor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors declared Tuesday that it has reached an impasse in its negotiations with the state and federal governments over health care funding and abruptly halted all expansion of its growing outpatient programs. Lawmakers said they are freezing up to $30 million in expenditures "to lessen the catastrophic meltdown" in public health services that could result should a key federal waiver not be renewed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State lawmakers Thursday expressed concern that Los Angeles County is sitting on millions of dollars in unspent welfare funds and said they may set a deadline for the county to use the money or lose it. Those officials fear that if the money--expected to reach $800 million over the next five years-- goes unspent, federal authorities might reduce future welfare expenditures to the state. "It's very embarrassing to realize that L.A. County has all this money, it's ridiculous," said state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1999 | TONY LYSTRA
The budget bill passed by the House of Representatives on Thursday contains $2 million to help complete the Backbone Trail in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. The money was added to the budget by Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks), who says it will make it possible to fill gaps in the 70-mile trail. "Considering the budget mess, I'm pleased we got anything at all," said Peter Loge, Sherman's chief of staff. Sherman hailed the funding as a victory for preserving open space.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1999 | Jesus Sanchez
The Department of Housing and Urban Development announced about $31 million in Economic Development Initiative grants and loan guarantees for projects in Los Angeles County. The grants and guarantees--which enable communities to borrow money at reduced rates--will help finance projects in Huntington Park, Long Beach, Monterey Park and Santa Fe Springs. Huntington Park was allocated $7.8 million to develop a new downtown retail and entertainment development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Los Angeles County and the state and federal governments inched closer to a deal to fund the nation's second-largest public health system Tuesday, more than 150 doctors, workers and patients marched on the county Hall of Administration demanding a swift end to the delays, which have thrown their futures in doubt. "I'm here to talk about a crime," Beth Osthimer, a lawyer with San Fernando Valley Neighborhood Legal Services, said to a cheering crowd of doctors, workers and uninsured patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State lawmakers Thursday expressed concern that Los Angeles County is sitting on millions of dollars in unspent welfare funds and said they may set a deadline for the county to use the money or lose it. Those officials fear that if the money--expected to reach $800 million over the next five years-- goes unspent, federal authorities might reduce future welfare expenditures to the state. "It's very embarrassing to realize that L.A. County has all this money, it's ridiculous," said state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1999
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday accepted a $53-million settlement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs to county facilities damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, ending a multiyear dispute. By accepting FEMA's offer, the supervisors decided not to go to court to seek the more than $700 million officials had believed the county was entitled to under a strict reading of federal law.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More accustomed to hearing pleas for money than making them, Los Angeles County's five supervisors will press the federal government today to extend a billion-dollar health care waiver--although the county has not fulfilled all the promises it made to win the exemption four years ago. The waiver, a change in federal rules governing Medicaid spending that helped the county stave off bankruptcy in 1995, does not expire until next year.
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