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December 18, 1994 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade after crack cocaine first flooded the streets of Los Angeles, its legacy of destruction ranks among the most deadly, costly and socially upending catastrophes to confront the nation's most populous county. Since 1984, crack has destroyed one undernourished neighborhood after another, devouring countless souls who have succumbed to its seductively cheap price and powerful high. But the crisis has not been the sole province of junkies, or the exclusive headache of police and bureaucrats.
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NEWS
July 10, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County officials, realizing that there is no tax collector in outer space, hope to fill the void. Reaching 22,300 miles above the equator, boldly going where no tax collector has gone before, Los Angeles County Assessor Rick Auerbach is angling to impose property taxes on several satellites. Though never done before in California, the move is legal, say state and county tax attorneys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's continuing fiscal crisis may have resulted in pink slips for thousands of workers over the last 18 months, but those who kept their jobs have received a pleasant windfall: a huge boost in overtime pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2001 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tussle between Los Angeles County supervisors and one of the county's unions has delayed use of a $40-million fund that could reduce a critical shortage of nurses and other skilled medical employees. The money is intended, at least in part, to retrain some of the 20,000-plus employees in the county's sprawling health department to perform critical tasks, union and health officials said. These would include working as dialysis nurses or technicians who can read brain scans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four years, Los Angeles County paid millions of dollars to a private network of community clinics run by a doctor who was supposed to be working at a public hospital while earning his six-figure county salary, according to health department officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supervisor Mike Antonovich has vowed to try to save the Los Angeles County Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, an anti-smut group that faces elimination in a scheduled vote today. The Board of Supervisors may dissolve the 53-year-old commission as part of the county's cost-cutting measures, even though the group has received no public funding for the past several years.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | JOSH MEYER and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As another Wall Street rating agency placed Los Angeles County's finances under review, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved the outlines of an interim budget that calls for $257 million in cuts--but postpones hard choices about drastic reductions in the county's troubled health care system. The supervisors, facing a $1.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In another blow to Los Angeles County's finances, a major credit-rating agency Wednesday downgraded the county's bonds for the third time in 2 1/2 years and warned that the ratings could drop further if the county's budget woes worsen. Moody's Investors Service, one of the two major Wall Street rating firms, reduced its credit grade on the largest portion of the county's $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
As fire season creeps in with high winds and hot weather, Los Angeles County Fire Department officials are drumming up support for Proposition E, a special tax on the June 3 ballot that would help maintain current staffing levels after a portion of their budget is lost. "There is a misconception in the public about how we're funded," said Assistant Fire Chief Stephen J. Alexander, who has toured his division area speaking about the proposition.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County government expects to nearly double its energy bill for next year, from $75 million to a whopping $140 million, a hike that will cut into the county's surplus and could force service cuts if prices continue to rise through what all sides predict will be a difficult year in the state's energy crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite significant pressure on the Los Angeles County budget that could force the closure of medical clinics in poor neighborhoods, Sheriff Lee Baca is pushing for a plan to invest more than $50 million in the dilapidated Hall of Justice, where he would like to relocate. "There are practical reasons and aesthetic reasons," he said. "The sheriff of the largest county in the U.S. needs to be in close proximity with the county Board of Supervisors, City Hall and the chief of police."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors had a typical holiday season dilemma Tuesday: Suddenly in possession of an end-of-the-year windfall, should the supervisors spend it on unglamorous items--like, say, paying the bills--or go on a shopping spree? Supervisors did a little of both with the $31 million in property tax money the state Legislature gave them this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The liberals urged austerity and cautious spending of government money. The conservatives railed about the need to expand government programs that protect the people. And they say Florida's system is weird. Los Angeles County's supervisors are deadlocked over how to spend $31 million in surplus funds at a time when deficits loom in the future but pressure is mounting to expand politically popular programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Programs to boost early childhood development in Los Angeles County and provide in-home counseling for parents of newborn babies are among the first recipients of $34 million in local Proposition 10 cigarette tax revenues, officials announced Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending nearly four hours speaking of the need for tough decisions to close a dangerous deficit in its health department budget, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday separately voted to pump $86 million into a package of politically popular medical programs. The expenditures, made late in the afternoon with little discussion, contrasted sharply with the board's earlier rhetoric about the need to cut the troubled health department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1993
Members of Los Angeles County's legislative delegation and the Board of Supervisors agreed Friday to develop a joint strategy to keep open the county's financially strapped probation camps for young offenders. The county needs $60 million to save the 19 camps, which house youths convicted of a variety of crimes, mostly felonies. The camps are financed from the General Fund. Officials have said that without state help the camps will be closed by May 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1993 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they grapple with the worst fiscal crisis in their history, members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are running offices with annual payrolls of up to $1.9 million, including salaries of two aides earning more than $100,000 a year. Operating without firm spending controls, the five supervisors vary greatly in how much they spend to staff their offices, an examination of payroll expenditures shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-care workers, among the lowest paid government employees in the state, won a 50-cent-an-hour raise Tuesday from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors but said they still cannot make ends meet. The workers said the raise to $6.75 an hour, without health insurance, is too low and should be increased to at least $7.50 per hour with health benefits. To make that point, several got themselves arrested Monday during peaceful demonstrations in front of the supervisors' offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of more than 90,000 current and retired members of county employee unions have taken the first step toward a lawsuit that could foreclose the use of their pension earnings to balance Los Angeles County's $15-billion budget. The union coalition filed a claim against the county last week alleging that the arrangement, hatched in 1994 to avert hospital closures and possible county bankruptcy, is illegal.
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