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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors ratified a pay raise for county Executive Officer Thomas G. Mauk on Tuesday, just two weeks after he turned down the job of running Los Angeles County government. The new agreement calls for Mauk to receive an 8% pay raise -- from $215,000 to $232,200 -- for 2006, retroactive to June 23. In addition, his annual salary will rise to $241,488 for 2007, retroactive to Jan. 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Robert Greene
In August, as the newly formed Blue Ribbon Commission on Child Protection convened for the first time and members spoke aloud about the kinds of issues they expected they'd have to deal with, appointee Andrea Rich noted that there are certain problems inherent in “ running big, awful bureaucracies .” And she ought to know, because as the former president and CEO of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, she once had a front row seat...
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OPINION
August 24, 2007
Re "Twice chastised, he gets a new job," Aug. 20 I was already at the zero level in faith and confidence in Los Angeles County government until I read this article, which has the secondary headline: "The son of a top-ranking L.A. County executive, while working for the Sheriff's Department, was disciplined but not fired for ties to suspects." What message does this send to us law-abiding citizens? Now I am at the zero-minus level in faith and confidence. Andrew J. Chitiea Rancho Santa Fe
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Abby Sewell
The fight between labor and Los Angeles County government intensified Friday, when a coalition of unions representing 90,000 workers banded together to fight county efforts to reduce retirement healthcare benefits for future employees. Until now, the disagreement had been limited to one union that represents county workers, SEIU 721, which has been working without a contract for a month. On Friday, several other unions that have already signed contracts with a 6% raise announced that they would be joining the Service Employees International Union local in its fight over healthcare costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996
The city of Los Angeles' chief legislative analyst, Ron Deaton, has withdrawn from consideration for the top administrative job in Los Angeles County government. The decision leaves a narrow field of finalists to replace county Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed, who resigned last month to become director of the state Department of Motor Vehicles. Deaton, one of the most important officials at City Hall, said Wednesday he preferred to stay with the city, where he has spent 31 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992
The seat of Los Angeles County government will be renamed in honor of retiring Supervisor Kenneth Hahn if supervisors approve, as expected, a motion made Tuesday by Supervisor Ed Edelman. In introducing the motion, Edelman said Hahn's name "is synonymous with the county of Los Angeles." The downtown Hall of Administration, on Temple Street in the Civic Center, would be officially known as "Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration."
OPINION
May 23, 2012
Re "Supervisors failing to act," Column, May 20 Finally, someone is calling for real reform of Los Angeles County government. The fact that the assessor and the sheriff are elected by voters is just part of the problem. A complete overhaul of county government can only be achieved with a review by an elected commission of voters, not politicians. The county is simply unable to reform itself. It needs an elected executive, a bigger Board of Supervisors and an assessor and a sheriff who serve at the pleasure of the executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1991
No matter who wins today's special election in Los Angeles County, voters in the 1st District will make history. But they'll do much more than that by electing Los Angeles City Councilwoman Gloria Molina to the county board. Both Molina and her opponent, state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) are Mexican-Americans, so one of them will be the first Latino elected to the board in this century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992
It's been evident for a while that some of the people who run Los Angeles County government seem beyond any sense of shame. There was the matter of $3 million in bonuses for top executives in 1990, and last year Hall of Administration offices were remodeled to the tune of $3.4 million. Now, while the homeless huddle in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, Times reporters have discovered that top Los Angeles County officials are, once again, grabbing with gusto for the public purse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991
The new state budget will have a major impact in Los Angeles County on an array of services. Here is a selected summary: LOS ANGELES COUNTY GOVERNMENT Assumes responsibility for $730 million in state programs, boosting the proposed county budget to $11.8 billion. Will operate all local mental health, indigent health and a larger share of in-home supportive services, and have responsibility over foster care and children's services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
All three members of a board that settles labor disputes for Los Angeles County government's 100,000 employees resigned unexpectedly this week, citing concerns that the agency's independence is being eroded. The action by the members of the Employee Relations Commission comes in the midst of contentious labor negotiations between county government and its largest employees union. The commissioners said their resignation was sparked by a recent change in the county's contract with hearing officers who listen to labor grievances and recommend how the commission should decide them.
OPINION
May 23, 2012
Re "Supervisors failing to act," Column, May 20 Finally, someone is calling for real reform of Los Angeles County government. The fact that the assessor and the sheriff are elected by voters is just part of the problem. A complete overhaul of county government can only be achieved with a review by an elected commission of voters, not politicians. The county is simply unable to reform itself. It needs an elected executive, a bigger Board of Supervisors and an assessor and a sheriff who serve at the pleasure of the executive.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | Hugo Martin
Tourism has surpassed international trade as Los Angeles County's top industry in a new ranking that reflects the growing effect of hotels, shops and restaurants as job creators in Southern California. "This just goes to show that tourism is not just touring the stars' homes and visiting Disneyland," said economist Jack Kyser, author of the report for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. But the news also has a darker side.
OPINION
May 19, 2008
Was Bernard C. Parks quicker to endorse Barack Obama than Mark Ridley-Thomas? Was Ridley-Thomas quicker to condemn the management of Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Medical Center than Parks? Will Parks do the bidding of big business? Is Ridley-Thomas in the pocket of big labor? Those are the kinds of questions most often asked by pundits about the candidates vying to succeed Los Angeles County Supervisor Yvonne B. Burke in the June 3 election. Voters want to know the answers, and that's fine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2008 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Despite facing a looming budget crunch, county supervisors will today consider giving Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley a 23% pay raise in an attempt to keep his salary on par with those of other county department heads and top prosecutors elsewhere in the state. If three of the five supervisors approve the proposal, Cooley would make $292,300 a year, up from his current $236,829. Such a raise would make Cooley the highest-paid elected official in Los Angeles County government.
OPINION
August 24, 2007
Re "Twice chastised, he gets a new job," Aug. 20 I was already at the zero level in faith and confidence in Los Angeles County government until I read this article, which has the secondary headline: "The son of a top-ranking L.A. County executive, while working for the Sheriff's Department, was disciplined but not fired for ties to suspects." What message does this send to us law-abiding citizens? Now I am at the zero-minus level in faith and confidence. Andrew J. Chitiea Rancho Santa Fe
OPINION
February 21, 2002
The private grudge Mayor James K. Hahn denies that he nurses against Gov. Gray Davis and the state Democratic Party seems to have gone public last weekend. Hahn's schedule, his handlers said, was just too packed to play host to a state party convention in his own city. Oh, please. Hahn understandably seethed when Davis campaigned for his opponent and fellow Democrat, Antonio Villaraigosa, in last year's nonpartisan mayoral race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1995
Just what's happening in Los Angeles County government? Barely a day passes without some new disclosure of outrageous fiscal mismanagement. As if the county's $1.2-billion deficit were not crisis enough, now comes news of yet more red ink. How did things get so out of control? Clearly, accountability lies with the Board of Supervisors and the officials it oversees. Take the case of Robert C. Gates, the outgoing director of the vast county Health Services Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors ratified a pay raise for county Executive Officer Thomas G. Mauk on Tuesday, just two weeks after he turned down the job of running Los Angeles County government. The new agreement calls for Mauk to receive an 8% pay raise -- from $215,000 to $232,200 -- for 2006, retroactive to June 23. In addition, his annual salary will rise to $241,488 for 2007, retroactive to Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
As a kid in South Los Angeles, James A. Bell's ambition was to follow in his father's footsteps and deliver the mail. "When I was growing up, I didn't know what a CEO or CFO was," Bell recalled last week. "I thought people who worked at the post office were those we could look up to. They were the ones making the honest living, and that was something I thought I could do." He's doing something else. One week ago, the 56-year-old was named interim chief executive of Boeing Co.
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