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Los Angeles County Government Employees Wages And Salaries

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
Aides and pages from the Los Angeles County library system, along with their supporters, staged lunchtime demonstrations outside four area libraries Monday to demand better pay. Demonstrators picketed and leafleted outside libraries in El Monte, West Hollywood, Carson and Valencia, representing a geographic cross-section of the county's 87-library system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles doctor earns a meager $10,000 annually, forcing him to turn to food stamps to feed his family. An attorney working nearby makes thousands of dollars less than the lawyers he supervises because his salary is paid by a different entity. And, miles away, there labors a library aide who receives no health benefits to pay for her arthritis treatments because she is a part-time employee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The complexities of the nationwide movement to require what backers consider a living wage were on full display at the Board of Supervisors' meeting Tuesday, as the region's largest employer wrestled with the question of equity for its thousands of low-wage workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County, the region's largest employer, Tuesday warned its hundreds of contractors that they may be required to pay their workers some form of living wage. Though the Board of Supervisors has yet to draft such a law, its admonition makes an ordinance virtually inevitable and adds the county's weight to a national movement to guarantee pay above the legal minimum wage. "I don't know how our children are going to forgive us . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The living wage movement to pay unskilled workers enough to keep them off the dole is homing in on a fat target, Los Angeles County government, which years ago outsourced thousands of jobs in an effort to save money and wound up with many full-time contract workers paid so little they remain paupers eligible for relief. These contract workers are employed chiefly in janitorial, food service and parking lot positions that pay more than the $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County will pay at least $1.6 million in overtime to staff welfare offices six days a week in an effort to meet federal and state welfare-to-work deadlines, officials said Thursday. The expenses represent 62,000 hours of overtime expected to be logged in an eight-week period covering May and June. The costs will probably continue to spiral as the county tries to enroll 100,000 recipients into its welfare -to-work program, Greater Avenues for Independence before a Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's labor strife deepened Thursday as employee sickouts virtually shut down some offices of the assessor and public works departments and the union representing 1,500 medical interns and residents threatened job actions over pay and working conditions. Talks with the doctors' union broke down Tuesday night, and county officials said they are now readying contingency plans in the event the interns and residents stage sickouts or other protests in the coming weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the county's largest union warned Thursday that their members will go on strike next week, department by department, unless the Board of Supervisors meets their demands for a significant pay raise. Union officials, releasing a poll they say shows the public overwhelmingly supports their call for a raise, outlined their strike strategy at a news conference at the county Hall of Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when the county's largest labor union, Service Employees International Union, Local 660, is threatening job actions against the county because its members want a raise, the local's own staff members have gone on strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,400 members of Los Angeles County's largest employee union voted Thursday evening to authorize a strike if their demands for a significant raise are not met by the time their various contracts expire Sept. 30. The workers, members of the Service Employees International Union, Local 660, also spent the evening plotting strategies for job actions leading up to such a walkout and signing up for civil disobedience protest workshops.
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