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January 9, 1985
A long legal battle apparently ended for James Craig Jr., 51, of Inglewood when he reported for work as a Los Angeles County Harbor Patrol officer at Marina del Rey. A state appeals court ruled that Craig, a former Santa Monica Harbor Patrol officer and county park patrolman, does not have to attend the Sheriff's Academy for updated training or be placed on probation in order to assume the new position.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
This is the marina--Marina del Rey, California. It's a big marina, said to be "the largest man-made recreational harbor in the world." Most of the 6,500 pleasure boats here are seaworthy; most of the boaters are decent, law-abiding folks. But some aren't. That's where John Rochford comes in. Rochford carries the badge of a sheriff's deputy and works the boat beat. His summer uniform is a white T-shirt, green shorts, white socks and white tennis shoes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
This is the marina--Marina del Rey, California. It's a big marina, said to be "the largest man-made recreational harbor in the world." Most of the 6,500 pleasure boats here are seaworthy; most of the boaters are decent, law-abiding folks. But some aren't. That's where John Rochford comes in. Rochford carries the badge of a sheriff's deputy and works the boat beat. His summer uniform is a white T-shirt, green shorts, white socks and white tennis shoes.
NEWS
January 9, 1985
A long legal battle apparently ended for James Craig Jr., 51, of Inglewood when he reported for work as a Los Angeles County Harbor Patrol officer at Marina del Rey. A state appeals court ruled that Craig, a former Santa Monica Harbor Patrol officer and county park patrolman, does not have to attend the Sheriff's Academy for updated training or be placed on probation in order to assume the new position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000
A 66-year-old Inglewood woman rescued earlier this week from a sinking pleasure craft died on Thursday of her injuries. Mildred Griffin, a subscription saleswoman for the Los Angeles Times, had been in a coma in the intensive care unit at Daniel Freeman Marina Hospital, spokeswoman Zan Dubin said. Griffin's 8-year-old grandson, Donta Perry, died shortly after the accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1997
Los Angeles County Harbor Patrol officers were keeping people off a rock wall at King Harbor in Redondo Beach on Thursday after 27 people were swept onto the rocks or into the ocean by a 12-foot wave on New Year's Day. "We are still having the swells coming through," Harbor Patrol Sgt. John Pitzer said. "The area is all taped off." Most of the waves hitting the sea wall on Thursday were about eight feet tall, just enough to splash over the rock barrier.
NEWS
April 25, 1985 | NIESON HIMMEL, Times Staff Writer
Strong, hot winds battered much of the Los Angeles Basin Wednesday night, blacking out nearly 12,000 homes in widely scattered areas, creating problems for motorists and pedestrians but causing no significant increases in accidents or fires, authorities said. The humidity was down to 9% at 11 p.m., and temperatures were still in the 70s. The day's high of 86 was recorded at 5:30 p.m. Because of the hot, dry northwest winds, the temperature at 11 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | GINA PICCALO and BOB POOL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No sooner had Ron May heard radio chatter of a boating accident at an oil refinery buoy off El Segundo than he swung his own pleasure craft Mystic around hard and started scanning the horizon. Barely a mile ahead, he spotted the running lights of the stricken boat, Charades, as it listed in the dark about 8:30 Monday night. Then, under a moonless sky, May and his friend Dick Tracy came upon four panic-stricken people screaming, "We're sinking! We're sinking!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Andy Rose is a fixture at the Thursday evening sailboat races in Newport Harbor -- freewheeling competitions dubbed the "beer cans" -- skippering his 49-foot, 11-inch silver beauty to first place nearly every week. As the sun sinks, Rose and about three dozen other competitors circle the waters south of Balboa Pavilion like sharks. The large boats, white sails fat with wind, slip past each other, angling toward the floating orange flag that marks the start.
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